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VIDEO: Billy Childish On His Paintings at Lehmann Maupin
26/10/2015
VIDEO: Billy Childish On His Paintings at Lehmann MaupinYou can’t miss Billy Childish. When the artist and musician entered the Lehmann Maupin Gallery before our interview, all eyes turned toward the man elaborately dressed in what appeared to be a safari uniform, his grin revealing a gold tooth buried in his mouth. A true performer, he regalled us as the camera began to roll with a story about once opening for a band at Radio City Music Hall, where, after angering the theater’s union employees, he was banned from the venue and not allowed to attend the after-party. Mischief, it seems, is not a problem for Childish. Rather, it’s a major part of his artistic practice. Among his long recording and writing career — somewhere near 125 albums and 45 books — Childish has established himself as a painter of some renown, evident in his latest show at Lehmann Maupin Gallery in Manhattan: “flowers, nudes and birch trees: New Paintings 2015,” plainly titled, is just that. Much of the work is large-scale and autobiographical, including revealing nudes of his wife (along with a few equally revealing self-portraits) and images of the forest and flowers that speak less to the pastoral imagination than a darker, more sinister view of what rests beyond the trees. Published: October 26, 2015 Read full article here

MENA Design Outlook Report Shows Promising Market, But Obstacles Remain
26/10/2015
MENA Design Outlook Report Shows Promising Market, But Obstacles RemainThe first MENA Design Outlook report, released by the Dubai Design & Fashion Council, painted a positive picture of the design market in the Middle East over the coming years. It also highlighted some of the obstacles that remain to be conquered, especially those of perception and intellectual-property protection. The report offers a comprehensive view on the design industries in the region, showing it is gradually transitioning from importer and consumer of design to a creator and exporter of design-driven products and services, explained Emmanuel Durou, partner at consultancy firm Monitor Deloitte, which authored the report. According to the report, the design sector in the MENA region grew at more than double the pace of the global industry over the last four years, surpassing $100 billion in combined revenues, with the UAE taking the largest 27 percent share. The report predicted that the MENA design industry will grow at an average 6.5 percent per year to reach $147.5 billion by 2019, contributing by then 5.2 percent of the global design market compared with the current 4.4 percent. “MENA is a sizeable market and we believe there is tremendous opportunity for growth,” said Durou, adding however that there are limitations in the market that require more government support, “Beyond incubations and funding, there is a need for enforcement of IP protection regimes. Most of the IP laws exist in the region, with very decent protection frameworks, but it’s more about the enforcement. The second key gaps are on talent and education.” Dubai has announced plans to become a global design and fashion hub by 2020. Earlier this year, it launched the first phase of its new Dubai Design District comprising 11 buildings to house 10,000 professionals. The second page is expected to be completed by 2018, with a final phase due in 2019. This week, the Dubai Design District is hosting the first Dubai Design Week, a large umbrella event that incorporates the Downtown Design fair, a curated exhibition of small national pavilions highlighting design talent in the region, and 12 large scale art and design installations peppered across the city, amongst others. Published: October 26, 2015 Read full article here

João Maria Gusmão and Pedro Paiva at Koelnischer Kunstverein
26/10/2015
Artists: João Maria Gusmão and Pedro Paiva Venue: Koelnischer Kunstverein, Cologne Exhibition Title: The Missing Hippopotamus Date: August 29 – October 27, 2015 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: Images courtesy of Koelnischer Kunstverein, Cologne Press Release: Situations in which the explicable and rationally comprehensible are confronted with […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

L’exposition « Splendeurs et Misères. Image de la prostitution »
26/10/2015
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“Room” Brings the Fear of Confinement to Life
26/10/2015
“Room” Brings the Fear of Confinement to LifeWhat is your greatest fear? For me, and I imagine many others, confinement to a small space, with only the slightest chance of catching a glimpse of the outside world, is pretty high up on the list. Add to this the elements of being confined to a small space against your will for a long period of time, with no idea of when or even if you’ll be able to leave, and you have the makings of a nightmare. This is the basic premise of “Room,” or at least the first half of it. Directed by Lenny Abrahamson, the film is written by Emma Donoghue — based on her novel of the same name — and is currently in theaters. It’s the recipient of that tenuous thing called “Oscar Buzz” due to its being awarded the People’s Choice Award at the Toronto Film Festival in September — in the past six years, winners of that award have racked up a total of 53 nominations, with three of the films winning Best Picture. Brie Larson plays Joy, the woman who is locked in a room. At first we don’t know why she is there, or even if she’s there against her will. With her in the room is her 5-year-old son Jack (Jacob Tremblay), a surprisingly intelligent if emotionally stunted child, considering it seems as if he has spent his entire short life in their small living space. The two have developed a close bond, spending their days exercising, playing games with the few resources at their disposal, and watching a small television with bad reception. Before going to bed, Jack walks around the room saying goodnight to the stove, the toilet, the couch, and the television. They are his only friends. It’s through Jack’s attachment to the television that Joy begins to explain to her child the reality of their situation, but the fact that a world exists outside their room is impossible for him to grasp. The only thing he knows is his mom, their few belongings, and the mysterious man named Old Nick, who arrives once a week bringing groceries and who, in exchange, has sex with Joy while Jack sleeps in a small wardrobe closet. Are they members of a doomsday prophesying cult? When Old Nick leaves he locks the door behind him, and the room has the distinct feel of a bunker. The script does a good job of slowly laying out details, piece by piece. Joy is remarkably calm most of the time, resigned to her situation. It’s only when dealing with her son, and his lack of understanding of why they are in the room, that she begins feel an immediate pressure to escape. She finally tells them why they’re in the room, how long she has been there, and why they need to get out as soon as possible. From there, she devises a plan. There’s no way of talking about the second half of the film without revealing the climax of their attempted escapes, which ends in a heart-racing sequence that practically gave me a panic-attack. But what can be said is that the film has more on its mind than exploring Joy and Jack’s life in the room. Other characters are revealed, and we are also thrown into the outside world. When the mystery of “Room” is solved, the film loses focus, resorting to clichés about abandonment and reconciliation. The first half is a like a powder keg ready to explode, and when it finally does it’s brilliant. But it’s a tension — will they or will they not make it out of the room? — that could have been contained for even longer. Instead, “Room” stops short. The aftermath does not live up to what came before. It shifts gears too quickly and in doing so, manages to turn a good movie into a mediocre one.   Published: October 26, 2015 Read full article here

Jon Rafman Mixes Sexy Tech With Video in London Art Show
26/10/2015
Jon Rafman Mixes Sexy Tech With Video in London Art ShowJon Rafman mixes passion, technology, video games, sculpture, a maze and a short action movie in an inventive show in London. The Canadian artist’s first major solo exhibition in the U.K. takes over the Zabludowicz Collection, which is based in in a 19th-century former Methodist Chapel. On first glance, the installations may seem to have little in common. Look again and it is clear that Rafman (born 1981) is constantly investigating desire in all its forms – how it is created and satisfied in this increasingly digital age. There are other art shows where the theme, the common thread, seems a little grafted on as an afterthought, almost as if the artist or gallerist wanted something to make a bigger statement and pretend the show is not simply an unrelated collection of random works. Here, however, the approach is everything, the starting point not an end vision, and it works. One of the most immersive works is Rafman’s latest, produced with Daniel Lopatin. “Sticky Drama” was made with more than 30 London children and with a soundtrack by Warp Records of music by Oneohtrix Point Never. The casual violence of games and childish role play are shown in the film. Visitors can also wonder through a large-scale real maze hedge or get lost in virtual reality devices which produce a disorienting mix of Internet memes and flickering images: soothing, scary, futuristic and then looking back nostalgically to past romantic literature and art. In addition, there are scattered references to so very modern nightmares of memory loss, hacking and computer crashes. The Zabludowicz Collection has worked with many artists on its annual commissions: Matt Stokes, 2009; Toby Ziegler, 2010; Laurel Nakadate, 2011; Matthew Darbyshire, 2012; Andy Holden, 2013; Lizzie Fitch/Ryan Trecartin, 2014. With a list like this, and Rafman’s latest, this commission is definitely one to watch for those in search of future promising artists.   Jon Rafman continues through at Zabludowicz Collection, 76 Prince of Wales Road, London NW5 3PT, though December 20. Telephone +44 (0)207 428 8940   Select Photo Gallery: Jon Rafman at Zabludowicz Collection London: SlideshowPublished: October 26, 2015 Read full article here

25 artistas coleccionables: Romuald Hazoume
26/10/2015
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25 artistas coleccionables: Romuald Hazoume
26/10/2015
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Slideshow: La rinascita del gioielliere John Rubel
26/10/2015
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Michael Van den Abeele at Museum Leuven
26/10/2015
Artist: Michael Van den Abeele Venue: Museum Leuven Exhibition Title: Opacity, Please Date: June 25 – October 25, 2015 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: Images courtesy of Museum Leuven Press Release: What do jaguars and dinosaurs have in common? To the Brussels-based artist Michael […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

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