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L’exposition « A Beautiful disorder » à la Fondation Cass pour la sculpture
29/06/2015
Language French Featured: 0Order: 0Tags: A Beautiful DisorderCass Sculpture FoundationchinaChineseNicholas ForrestAuthor(s): Nicholas ForrestSub-Channels: FeaturesShort Title : « A Beautiful disorder » à la Fondation Cass Read full article here

5 Films to See This Week in New York: “Young Mr. Lincoln,” “Amy,” and More
29/06/2015
5 Films to See This Week in New York: “Young Mr. Lincoln,” “Amy,” and More“The Prisoner of Shark Island,” “Young Mr. Lincoln,” Museum of the Moving Image, July 3-5 One of the most exciting film events of the summer is the Museum of the Moving Image’s not quite complete retrospective dedicated to John Ford, which includes 20 films directed by the man whom the critic Andrew Saris, in his essential book “The American Cinema” (1968), called one of the architects of a “cinema of memory.” A good place to start is with two different takes from Ford on the legacy of Abraham Lincoln, made three years apart. “The Prisoner of Shark Island” concerns the story of Dr. Samuel Alexander Mudd, who, in the film’s treatment of the story, is wrongly accused as a co-conspirator in the murder of Lincoln because he treated John Wilkes Booth for a leg injury in the middle of the night without recognizing him. Even if the film is an example of Ford’s “tendency toward historical amnesia,” as his biographer Joseph McBride describes it, and involves a certain amount of racial caricature, visually it’s one of the strongest and most inventive of Ford’s early period, especially when the action turns to the titular prison. “Young Mr. Lincoln” is the less thrilling but deeper portrait of Lincoln (Henry Fonda), who, in the film, according to the writer Geoffrey O’Brien, “exhibits at once a radiant sincerity and the devious subtlety of a trickster.” Focused on Lincoln’s early life, including his establishment of a law practice, the film is very much a companion piece to “Shark Island,” even if at first glance they seem nothing alike. Think about it this way: “Young Mr. Lincoln” is a vision of the idealized past Ford lamented in “Shark Island.” “A Poem is a Naked Person,” Film Forum, opening July 1 The documentarian Les Blank, who died in 2013, is best known for “Burden of Dreams” (1982), his film about the making of Werner Herzog’s “Fitzcarraldo.” But his best work can be found in the series of music documentaries he made beginning in the late 1960s, especially “The Blues Accordin’ to Lightnin’ Hopkins” (1970) and “A Well Spent Life” (1971). So the growing excitement for “A Poem is a Naked Person” (1974/2015) is understandable, given that its subject is the southern blue-eyed soul revivalist Leon Russell and that the film has never been released publically. Featuring vibrant concert footage and behind-the-scenes peaks into the studio, it’s also an engaging portrait of the weird and local in Oklahoma, where Russell was born and, at the time of filming, still resided. “Amy,” Brooklyn Academy of Music, opening July 2 This portrait of the late pop-soul singer Amy Winehouse comes courtesy of Asif Kapadia, who crafted a similar film about death and celebrity with “Senna” (2010). The film refuses to condemn or praise, but it’s not hard to see what could and should have been changed, and who shouldn’t have been part of Winehouse’s life. In the end, I was left thinking of a well-known line from “This Be The Verse,” a poem by Philip Larkin: “They fuck you up, your mum and dad/They may not mean to, but they do.” “The Princess of France,” Film Society of Lincoln Center, through July 2 Matías Piñeiro’s latest film, about an acting troupe in Buenos Aires that is reconnecting in order to record a radio-play adaptation of Shakespeare’s “Love’s Labour’s Lost,” once again proves that he is one of the most underappreciated filmmakers working today, a gifted, agile storyteller and muted stylist who understands the poetry of the close-up. (To read the full review of “The Princess of France,” click here.) Published: June 29, 2015 Read full article here

8 Artsiest Shows at Paris Men's Fashion Week Spring 2016
29/06/2015
8 Artsiest Shows at Paris Men's Fashion Week Spring 2016The artsiest collections at the men’s Spring 2016 shows involved inspirations culled from Japanese traditional dress, photography, architectural landscapes, and religious iconography. At Études, the collective headed by artist Aurélien Arbet and graphic designer Jérémie Egry, the collection’s theme riffed on David Weiss’ illustrated book of rain-drenched cityscapes from 1975, Up and Down Town. Silk-screen patchworks by Adrian Horni and Linus Bill made their way onto tunic-like tops and baggy trousers that were layered one over another, as did geometric gradients of grey appropriating urban camouflage as architectural landscapes. Designer Yusuke Takahashi at Issey Miyake also took cues from photo books: Yoshinori Mizutani’s Tokyo Parrots and Colors, to be exact. Painterly parrots were rendered on sumptuous silk blazers and sport coats in cobalt blue, pastel yellow and chartreuse, while references to Luis Barragán's buildings in Mexico City led to a series of outfits in equally bright hues of fuchsia and cyan. Japanese themes were taken over the top at Thom Browne, whose perennially elaborate sets this time manifested as a teahouse surrounded by scarecrows in kimonos in a field. Models, four of whom were dressed as geishas in full kimonos and crowned by Stephen Jones’ sculptural head gear, showed off sharp suits of traditional pinstripe, houndstooth, herringbone and seersucker, topped by heavy embroidery of traditional Japanese motifs including fish, cranes, flowers and event Mount Fuji. At Loewe, designer Jonathan Anderson decided to appropriate images from an early 18th-century screen from Japan that he had stumbled upon in an antique shop in Hong Kong onto clothes and bags. Beige linen trousers featured embroidered cartoonish motifs, say, while a pajama-looking ensemble with contrast piping on the pockets sported an all-over manga print in shades of red. Meanwhile, playing with religious iconography were the Italian designers at Givenchy (Riccardo Tisci) and Dolce & Gabbana. At Givenchy, Jesus was depicted in his thorn-crowned passion across T-shirts and — yes — skirts, as well as printed onto transparent sweatshirts. Tisci was riffing on “bad boys” and prison stripes, but applied a great couture finesse to the masculine tailoring and sportswear that was so refreshing to see amid the gender-bending, hyper-feminine collections at shows like Gucci, Valentino and Acne Studios. At Dolce & Gabbana, the collection was a mash-up of a Chinese fantasia dreamed up in the heart of Catholic Sicily: motifs of peacocks, pagodas took pride of place alongside various iterations of the Madonna and baby Jesus. Suits were immaculately — no pun intended — constructed to resemble fine Italian silk scarves overlaid with Chinese prints, while the palette of russets and blue-greens of the Asian theme gave way to the gold, black and white of the Italian one. Painterly effects were splashed over Yohji Yamamoto’s runway, as the Japanese designer played with brush-like prints and collaging, first with soft strokes, and toward the end, with hard slashes. “Like the caution signs in army places, the stripe is always strong because it means 'dangerous,’” he told reporters. Another Japanese designer Junya Watanabe, played with a lot of shapes, patterns and colors in a collection that was themed "Faraway," but was really about his collaboration with Vlisco, the Dutch company that has been the major supplier of fabric to West and Central Africa since the mid-19th century. Excessive patchwork, paired with straw hats, made some of the models resemble scarecrows, but oddly enough, some of them, in more painterly ensembles, evoked a young Vincent van Gogh. To view these runway looks, click on the slideshow. Select Photo Gallery: 8 Artsiest Shows at Paris Men's Fashion Week Spring 2016Published: June 29, 2015 Read full article here

Ikon Gallery’s 50th Anniversary Auction and Artist Editions
29/06/2015
Ikon Gallery’s 50th Anniversary Auction and Artist EditionsBirmingham’s internationally renowned Ikon Gallery is raising funds for its 50th Anniversary Endowment Fund with an auction of artworks donated by some of the most important contemporary artists, all of whom have exhibited at the gallery. The works will be auctioned during the Sotheby’s London Contemporary Art Day Auction on July 2 with the proceeds to be dedicated to the gallery’s future artistic program and the commissioning of new art work. Auction artists include: Hurvin Anderson, Giovanni Anselmo, Fiona Banner, David Batchelor, Christiane Baumgartner, Martin Creed, Ian Davenport, Ding Yi, AK Dolven, Marcel Dzama, Semyon Faibisovich, Bernard Frize, Ryan Gander, Antony Gormley, Arturo Herrera, Carmen Herrera, Lee Bul, Elizabeth Magill, Beatriz Milhazes, François Morellet, Dennis Oppenheim, Julian Opie, Cornelia Parker, Giuseppe Penone, Imran Qureshi, George Shaw, Amikam Toren, and Zhang Enli. Ikon has also collaborated with Plinth, an independent lifestyle shop, creative space, and producer of high quality editioned artworks based in Cliftonville, Margate, to launch a range of fantastic limited edition artworks by five participating artists: Cornelia Parker, Richard Deacon, Beatriz Milhazes, Richard Wilson, and Yinka Shonibare MBE. Available from the Ikon Shop, prices start from £200 and a commission on sales will augment money raised by the auction. The auction can be viewed here and the limited editions artworks here. Published: June 29, 2015 Read full article here

8 Artsiest Shows at Paris Men's Fashion Week Spring 2016
29/06/2015
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Michelle TaySub-Channels: RunwayShort Title : 8 Artsiest Shows at Paris Men's Fashion Week SS16Home Top Story: Top Story - InternationalTop Story - English, CanadaTop Story - English, FranceTop Story - English, United Kingdom Read full article here

Phillips Contemporary Art London Evening Sale — June 29, 2015
29/06/2015
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Regina MogilevskayaSub-Channels: AuctionsReferenced Artists: Andy WarholSigmar Polke Ai WeiweiBruce NaumanDamien HirstShort Title : Phillips Contemporary Art Evening Sale Read full article here

Carol Rama at Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris
29/06/2015
Artist: Carol Rama Venue: Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris Exhibition Title: The Passion According to Carol Rama Date: April 3 – July 12, 2015 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: Images courtesy of Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. Photos by Pierre […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Le collezioni Resort 2016 d’Acne Studio e di Roskanda
29/06/2015
Language Italy Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Michelle TaySub-Channels: RunwayShort Title : Le collezioni Resort 2016 d’Acne Studio e di Roska Read full article here

Milan
29/06/2015
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.gallerialiarumma.itLocation Email: liarumma@tin.itDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: IzmailovskyLocation Phone: 39 02 2900 0101:primary; 39 02 2900 3805:faxAdmissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

Jaanus Samma on His “NSFW” Estonian Pavilion in Venice
29/06/2015
Jaanus Samma on His “NSFW” Estonian Pavilion in VeniceEstonian artist Jaanus Samma’s Estonian Pavilion at the 56th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia continues the artist’s ongoing research into the stories of gay lives in Soviet Estonia. Titled “Not Suitable For Work. A Chairman’s Tale,” the project follows the story of Juhan Ojaste (1921–1990), a war hero, family man, and the successful chairman of a collective farm in Soviet Estonia who was arrested in 1964 for his involvement in homosexual acts and was later sentenced to one and a half years of hard labor. Following the loss of his social status, dignity, family, and job, Ojaste was forced to move towns, where, as an ex-convict, he was only offered menial, low-status positions. Ojaste was murdered in 1990, allegedly by a Russian marine and male prostitute, just a year before Estonia regained independence and homosexuality was decriminalized. “The social debate on LGBTI rights intercepts the wider issue of the violation of fundamental human rights, so common in the past and the current day alike. In this sense, the Chairman’s story becomes the tip of the iceberg for a broader denouncement addressed at all kinds of discrimination: cultural, social, political, religious, sexual, and racial. Therefore, once again, in order to remind us that art is always for the co-existence of differences,” explains Curator Eugenio Viola. To find out more about “Not Suitable For Work. A Chairman’s Tale,” BLOUIN ARTINFO got in touch with Jaanus Samma and asked him a few questions. Your Venice Biennale presentation in the Estonian Pavilion is titled “Not Suitable For Work. A Chairman’s Tale.” Could you explain the origins of the title and what it reveals about the presentation? The exhibition is based on my research on homosexuality in Soviet Estonia and I have chosen one man’s personal story to illustrate it. The man was called the Chairman and he got that nickname because he used to be a chairman of several collective farms or kolkhozy from the 1950s until mid-1960s. But his career was ended abruptly by a prison sentence for homosexual acts. So this leads us to the first part of the title; he literally wasn’t suitable for work and lost his position because gay sex was illegal at the time. But we wanted to play with the words, so NSFW can also refer to the sexually explicit materials in the show. What was the initial inspiration behind “Not Suitable For Work. A Chairman’s Tale” and how did it develop into the presentation that visitors will experience in Venice? When I started to collect the materials about this topic I did many interviews with elderly gay men to hear about life in Estonia in the 1960s and 70s. And then I also heard about the Chairman. He started to interest me because of his colorful life and with all these ups and downs, highlights and disasters. He was in a way the quintessence of the Soviet gay man. Putting the story together it started to remind me of a libretto of an Italian opera and this gave me the idea to use a kind of theatrical filter for interpreting the material. For example, in the videos we have used painted backdrops similar to the ones used in theatres. There is also a showcase with some props, and in the last room there is a real opera loge with red velvet and golden wall sconces. How has your past practice influenced and informed your Venice Biennale presentation? I have always worked with an installation where I combine different mediums together. Of course it means collaboration because I also want to use mediums I am not at home with. This makes the process hard but also very interesting because you cannot control everything. But it’s not only a question of medium, sometimes there are other artists who inspire me and with whom I want to collaborate. For example, for the show in Venice I did videos with the Estonian film maker Marko Raat and I commissioned composer Johanna Kivimägi and writer Maarja Kangro to create an aria. In what ways did you engage with the architecture and characteristics of the Estonian Pavilion with “Not Suitable For Work. Chairman’s Tale”? The Estonian Pavilion is a five-room apartment in Palazzo Malipiero, a very old and beautiful palazzo with history that goes back to the times of Casanova, who apparently also lived in that building. When my curator, Eugenio Viola, and I started to work on the exhibition we went to look at the rooms and built the show considering the particularity and characteristics of that space. And since I often flirt with camp and baroque aesthetics, this place went very well with my works. But it is a very interesting question because Venice biennial is very particular in the way that contemporary art is shown in these palazzos, together with chandeliers, frescos on the walls, marble staircases etc. It is a real challenge for an artist to make it work. “Not Suitable For Work. A Chairman’s Tale” is described as a work that “links the public and collective dimension of History with the private and biographical qualities of the chronicle.” What do you want visitors to experience when they visit the Estonian Pavilion this year? I wanted to use the micro historical approach because I think it makes us more emphatic about that topic. Seeing what that one particular person had to go through should make us question ourselves and the time we are living at the moment. Although working with historical narrative, I am actually interested in the present and the future. What does it mean to you to be selected to represent Estonia in Venice and how did you approach the opportunity in terms of the development of your own practice? Even though I feel that I am representing myself and not the country it is a big responsibility and I tried to give my best. But still I decided to take risks and to do something that was new and different from my earlier practice. Also, I have never worked with such a big team and it was interesting to experience that in one point you have to let it go and follow the flow not knowing exactly where it will end up. Because there is no point of collaborating if you don't give the freedom to your colleagues. Published: June 29, 2015 Read full article here

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