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Georgia Sagri at Kunsthalle Basel
12/04/2014
Artist: Georgia Sagri Venue: City of Basel Exhibition Title: Mona Lisa Effect Date: April 12, 2014 Note: On the occasion of Georgia Sagri’s exhibition at the Kunsthalle Basel, 14 posters (edition 1/7 and 2/7) have been installed throughout public spaces in the city of Basel. Courtesy Georgia Sagri and Kunsthalle Basel. Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

David Zwirner Gallery at Art Cologne 2014
12/04/2014
David Zwirner Gallery is another major gallery that is participating in Art Cologne 2014. Associate Director Veronique Ansorge shows us some of the works, the gallery has brought to Cologne. Among others, these are works by Neo Rauch, Jason Rhodes, Oscar Murillo, Michael Riedel, Thomas Schütte, and Martin Kippenberger. David Zwirner Gallery at Art Cologne […] Read full article here

Georgia Sagri at Kunsthalle Basel
11/04/2014
Artist: Georgia Sagri Venue: City of Basel Exhibition Title: Mona Lisa Effect Date: April 12, 2014 Note: On the occasion of Georgia Sagri’s exhibition at the Kunsthalle Basel, 14 posters (edition 1/7 and 2/7) have been installed throughout public spaces in the city of Basel. Courtesy Georgia Sagri and Kunsthalle Basel. Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

VIDEO: "Richard Serra Week" in Qatar Features Desert Sculpture
11/04/2014
VIDEO: "Richard Serra Week" in Qatar Features Desert SculptureDoha, QATAR — Richard Serra was feted in Qatar this week with the opening of several exhibitions in venues around the capitol Doha. The renowned American sculptor was on hand as his “East-West/West-East” was unveiled in the desert about 40 miles from Doha. The work, commissioned by the emir’s sister, Sheikha al-Mayassa bint Hamad al-Thani and the Qatar Museums Authority she heads, consists of four massive steel plates of varying heights of about 50 feet that rise from the desert sands. Serra walked through the permanent installation in the desert with dignitaries and reporters telling them why he selected the location based on the view and landscape. “When I first came here, Sheikha al-Mayassa asked me… if I want to build a piece in the landscape and I said, what landscape?”, said Serra during his remarks at the unveiling. “And she said the desert. To tell you the truth, I don’t know what the desert was all about here.” Serra says he toured four different deserts with a Bedouin and kept returning to the same spot in the Brouq Nature Reserve, where a peninsula juts out into the waters of the Gulf, “like a finger separating the sea on the East and the sea on the West.”  The unveiling of the sculpture was set to coincide with Serra’s first solo exhibition in the Middle East at the Al Riwaq Doha Exhibition Space and QMA Gallery at Katara, entitled “Passage of Time”. The new large-scale work is comprised of two 220-foot long and 13-foot-high steel curves “that snake through the exhibition space” and around works from the artist’s 50-year career. Both entitled “Richard Serra”, the two exhibitions are curated by Alfred Pacquement, former director of the National Museum of Modern Art, Centre Pompidou in Paris. The shows run through July 6. Read ARTINFO Q & A with Richard Serra in Qatar HERE.  Published: April 11, 2014 Read full article here

Tiffany's Celebrates Blue Book Collection With "Diamond Sky" Projection Installation
11/04/2014
NEW YORK — Ten projectors spread out across the Guggenheim Museum last night gave about 250 guests the feeling of being encased in a precious gemstone at Tiffany & Co.’s launch of its 2014 Blue Book collection. Artists from Glowing Bulbs and John Ensor Parker, in collaboration with multimedia curator Leo Kuelbs, staged a mapping projection installation called “The Diamond Sky,” using light reflections and refractions to create colorful, geometric patterns, approximating jewelry and building facades at different times, that spun across Frank Lloyd Wright’s signature spiraling parapets up toward the night sky visible through the oculus. Speaking to BLOUIN Artinfo at the event, Kuelbs said: “The idea was to make it appear as if you’re inside a gem. Playing with both light and depth, people should be able to take away a sense of having received a virtual heirloom.” The starting point of inspiration was of course the collection of sparkling gemstones, said Kuelbs, which includes diamonds and colored gemstones in the most elegantly crafted designs, with key pieces inspired from the Fifth Aveue jeweler’s archives. But then, there was the challenge of the lack of continuous wall space, or projection surface, to consider. “Once we knew the site was the Guggenheim, we started thinking about where the people were going to be watching the installation from. The challenges were also where the nice surprises arose. We only have these parapet areas so there’s all this negative space in between, but the artists, Glowing Bulbs and John Ensor Parker, are great, they really know what they’re doing.” Kuelbs has curated a myriad of artistic events involving public art, luxury marketing, video art and multi-city programs in cities such as New York and Berlin, focusing on collaborative projects with an emphasis on conceptual infrastructure. Recent projection mapping shows include two for Dom Perignon, “The Expanding Universe” and “Divine Coalescence”, and “Codex Dynamic,” which was presented across roughly 34,000 sq ft of the Manhattan Bridge in 2012.  Last October, the trio staged “Blueprints and Perspectives,” an outdoor exhibition of light, video, sound and performance that was played out on The Wyly Building as part of Aurora the contemporary art exhibition in Dallas, Texas. “When you do something so large-scale and enveloping, when there’s more going on than you can see, it creates a vulnerability in people that are gathered together in one vulnerable spot looking at something really beautiful. That can be a really powerful feeling for people,” said Kuelbs, who added that the installation for Tiffany’s — comprising a 6-minute main piece and a 20-minute teaser — was so exclusive that it would “only ever be be shown twice, tonight only, and to the 250 people here only.” The event at the Guggenheim drew such celebrities and supermodels as Katie Holmes, Jessica Biel, Kate Bosworth (pictured below), Hilary Rhoda and Fei Fei Sun. To see the stunning jewels from the Blue Book on display, click on the slideshow.   Tiffany's Celebrates Blue Book Collection With "Diamond Sky" Projection InstallationSelect Photo Gallery: Tiffany's 2014 Blue Book CollectionPublished: April 11, 2014 Read full article here

Tiffany's 2014 Blue Book Collection
11/04/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Michelle Tay Read full article here

Slideshow: Collector Profile - Glenn Pushelberg and George Yabu
11/04/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Benjamin Park Read full article here

Q&A: Richard Serra on His Monumental Qatari Desert Sculpture
11/04/2014
Q&A: Richard Serra on His Monumental Qatari Desert SculptureWatch ARTINFO video of Richard Serra unveiling his desert sculpture HERE.  In celebration of renowned American sculptor Richard Serra’s first solo exhibition in the Middle East, which opened in Qatar on April 10, the Qatar Museums Authority (QMA), under the patronage of QMA Chairperson Sheikha Al Mayassa Bint Hamad Al Thani, commissioned Serra to produce a site-specific standing-plate work conceived for the dramatic desert landscape of the Brouq Nature Reserve, near Zekreet in western Qatar. Consisting of four steel plates measured by their relation to the topography, “East-West/West-East” spans more than one kilometer in length through a natural corridor formed by gypsum plateaus. According to the QMA, all four of the level plates, each rising between 14.7 meters and 16.7 meters above the ground, can be seen and explored from either end of the sculpture. To learn more about “East-West/West-East,” ARTINFO recently spoke with Serra about the new work. How did the opportunity to install a work in the desert come about? It came about around November 2010. I was doing a piece here for the Islamic Museum by I. M. Pei — I was building a large vertical structure, and at the time the Qatar Museum Authority asked me if I would think about building a piece into the landscape. And I asked them, “Which landscape?” And they said, “The desert.” I had no real desire to do that, but I said I would take a look, as I had never worked in the desert before. And they gave me an assistant who was a Bedouin, who knew every foot of every desert. We went to three of four deserts, and we finally came to a place called the Brouq Nature Reserve, which is a desert park that is a preserved park. And the main feature of this park is that is has a series of gypsum plateaus, which are about 50 feet high, and it’s as if there was an ancient sea there once, and the sea eroded, so you have two levels — you have the levels of the gypsum plateaus, and the level of the seabed as it is now. I think you could probably compare it to the South West and John Ford country, only much more evaporated, and made of white, chalky plateaus, rather than hard, high plateaus; it’s a plateaued desert, it’s very craggy, it’s not a sandy desert. What we did was made various trips into the desert and we had to find a location or a site where we thought we could make a place within the undifferentiated space of the desert with its gypsum plateaus. And while I was working on the piece called “7,” during the daytime I would go out into the desert with my wife and John Silverman, a friend of mine, and we would explore different sites. And that took about a year. And we located two sites, and then those were translated into topographical maps; and then actual full-scale, inch to a foot models were made back in New York. I had one where I live in Long Island, North Fork, and one in New York. Then we worked with the models, arrived at some possible conclusion of what we could do, and we came back and chose one site. What was it about the Zekreet Peninsula location that appealed to you? The site we chose is a site that has two gypsum plateaus that are separate by about 400 to 500 yards, and it bisects the peninsula of this desert — this desert is like a little peninsula that sits off the southern part of Qatar. The peninsula is not too wide, maybe four to five miles wide and 10 to 15 miles long, and we found a place where we thought we could connect both borders of the peninsula by placing something between these two gypsum plateaus. You have to realize that the sea level of the desert is relatively flat, and the space between the two plateaus is more or less like a saddle in that it has a curvature that goes over, and a curvature that is flattened like a low u-shape — more or less a topographical saddle. From a great distance you can’t see over the plateaus, if you are two or three miles away, but when you actually walk to the centers, between the two plateaus, an entirely different region of the landscape opens, so there is two landscapes in terms of the terrain that I wanted to adjoin. And I went back and looked at my models and tried out various insertions into the possibility of what could be done. But then I finally arrived at the conclusion that I had to use the elevations of the gypsum plateaus. So what I did is I made four plates that are level to each other and level to the gypsum plateaus. And their placement was derived through a topological map. So in order to align them I had to find the pace where they would be level to each other, and their heights are 16.7 meters and 14.7 meters, which is about 54 feet high and 48 feet high, and they are level to each other, which means the landscape falls in two directions — two meters through the gypsum plateaus, the end plates are higher than the two center plates and all they are all level to each other and level to the gypsum plateaus. And the placement is very irregular because the placement is decided by where they would be aligned and where they would fall on the plan. And it stands at little under a kilometer. We weren’t sure actually until we got the fourth one up that you would be able to see all four from either end. What do you want people to think and feel when they experience the work? I don’t want to force a meaning on anyone. I think what happens is people go to the desert and it’s a place where one contemplates one’s own existence to some degree, it’s a very solitary place. It’s a place where one doesn’t really contemplate the past or the future, where one can really be in the presence of what the place allows in terms of internal reflection. And this place makes a space within that place to walk and measure yourself against the rise and fall of the landscape. And what I found is that — we opened it the other day and hundreds of people arrived — and they walk the entire length and back, and for the most part people were very generous in the way that they felt about their experience. Basically what the piece does is it collects the space, it makes a place within the space, and connects both sides of the peninsula where the water is both on the eastern and western side. The piece is directly on axis with east-west, so I called it “East-West” not only because it is on the axis of east-west, but also because I am a Westerner working in the East, and it kind of multiplies that joining of both propositions. Some people have questioned the relevance of the sculpture in the middle of the desert and whether it was worth the cost. What is your response? I think that I am making a cultural contribution to the country. The pieces are of a certain height and thickness where I think they will last; the piece has an implied timelessness, and I think it is seen as that. You have said that you consider space to be your primary material. How is that reflected in “East-West/West-East”? What I do is use steel in order to collect space in relationship to how people understand their movement through space. So the piece deals with the nature of duration and time in relation to walking and looking, and people went out there and that’s what they did. I think in the future that is what people will do. I think it’s gotten quite a bit of notification here, people are starting to go out there — it’s not that far from Doha, it’s about an hour and 20 minute drive out there so I think people will explore it and it’s my hope that as people go through this area of the country that they’ll go and have a look. You have called “East-West/West-East” your most fulfilling piece to date. “East-West/West-East” is definitely one of the most fulfilling pieces I have done in my life. I have spent a long time coming and going in and out of the desert. Since I have been here for the last three weeks I have only missed one or two days. And during the installation, which lasted five days, I was there the entire time. And what you find there is that every day the light changes, every day the wind changes, every day your relationship to the place changes. It’s not the kind of desert that has soft sand, it’s a really hard, rough, craggly desert — the only place I could compare it to in the United States that would make any sense at all is the South West, but it is not really like that. It is a gypsum plateaued desert with two very distinct sea levels — with these enormous gypsum plateaus. This interview has been edited and condensed.  Published: April 11, 2014 Read full article here

Group Show at Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis
11/04/2014
Artists: Kathy Acker, Abe Ajay, Mike Albo, Artists Poster Committee (Frazier Dougherty, Jon Hendricks, Irving Petlin), Kathe Burkhart, Nao Bustamante, Jibz Cameron, Leidy Churchman, Dennis Cooper, Zackary Drucker, Nicole Eisenman, Tracey Emin, Daniel Feinberg, Louise Fishman, Glen Fogel, Hollis Frampton, Simon Fujiwara, Gary Gissler, Guerilla Art Action Group (G.A.A.G.), Harmony Hammond, Kathleen Hanna and Toby […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Truth, 24 Frames Per Second: "Art of the Real" at FSLC
11/04/2014
Truth, 24 Frames Per Second: "Art of the Real" at FSLCThe ethnographer and filmmaker Jean Rouch once claimed, in an oft-referenced remark, that “fiction is the only way to penetrate reality.” That idea, complicated as it may sound, has been part of the fabric of documentary cinema since its beginnings, as early as the pioneering films of Robert Flaherty (who himself famously said, “Sometimes you have to lie to tell the truth.”). For Rouch, the camera wasn’t simply a recording device, nor could it be, but instead a tool of provocation. What the camera produced was a “truth of cinema” — as opposed to a “cinema of truth,” theorized by Russian filmmaker Dziga Vertov — that was willfully constructed out of the elements, all the fiction and nonfiction, of daily life, and what he would later refer to as an “ethno-cinema.” Rouch’s shadow hangs over “Art of the Real,” an expansive new series at the Film Society of Lincoln Center that is something of a survey of recent cinema — with a few historical detours — that resolutely abandons the strict boundaries of fiction and nonfiction film. The program contains more than 50 short and feature-length films, many of them from filmmakers whose work is rarely shown in the United States, which makes it difficult to parse. I’ve seen most of the work here, and for what I’ve not seen it’s safe to say it’s worth checking out. But let’s start at the beginning. Rouch’s “Jaguar” (1954/67) will screen as part of a focus on the Sensory Ethnography Lab, whose work was recently featured in the Whitney Biennial and whose practice is uniquely indebted to the former. In many ways, these works define the contours of nonfiction cinema, where it started and where it is now. The Whitney’s presentation of the Sensory Ethnography Lab’s work left much to be desired, so it’s a thrill that the films — including Stephanie Spray and Pacho Velez’s extraordinary “Manakamana” (2013), which opens theatrically in New York (beyond the “Art of the Real” series) on April 18 — will be screened in a theater, bringing out the audio-visual details that are lacking in the clustered Biennial. Thom Andersen, whose work was included in the 2012 Whitney Biennial, will present a host of films, including the dense “Red Hollywood” (1996), a documentary about Communist screenwriters and filmmakers who worked within the studio system from the 1930s to the 1950s, as well as “Eadweard Muybridge, Zoopraxographer” (1975), an essay-film that reframes the photographer as one of the earliest practitioners of moving images. The latter will be joined by “Olivia’s Place” (1966/74), an early work, as well as the wonderfully named new film “Hey, Asshole!” (2014). Andersen’s films combine historical research and dry wit, working as much as documentaries as sharp criticism of the documentary form. Raya Martin and Mark Peranson’s “La ultima pelicula” (2013), along with Robert Greene’s “Actress” (2014), the opening and closing night films respectively, both challenge and mock traditional narrative filmmaking practice in equal measure. “La ultima pelicula” stars filmmaker Alex Ross Perry as, well, essentially himself — although a much more egotistical and self-serving version, I imagine — who’s scouting locations for a film about the end of the world, using the last available film stock. Ostensibly a behind-the-scenes portrait of the fictional narrative film, the two forms begin to blend, and the viewer is left to pick through the remains. “Actress” is a much more subtle and less vexing film. What begins as a documentary about the actress Brandy Burre, who had a recurring role on HBO’s “The Wire” before departing acting for motherhood, becomes a portrait of her inner turmoil visualized. Burre decides to get back into acting at the same time as her family life is crumbling around her, and Greene’s camera collapses Burre the subject and Burre the character, incorporating narrative tropes from Hollywood melodrama into the patchwork of the film.  An illicit affair worthy of a steamy romance picture unfolds in Jane Gillooly’s “Suitcase of Love and Shame” (2013), a film that questions what materials are truly necessary to make a “film.” Composed of hours of audio recordings passed back and forth between a married man and his secret lover, Gillooly recreates the ebb and flow of their relationship through an intimate handling of their private correspondence. “Suitcase,” along with other audio-based works such as Ernst Karel’s “Swiss Mountain Transport Systems” (2011), succinctly pose some of the questions that are weaved throughout the “Art of the Real” program: Is a film that highlights the audio instead of the visual still a film? Does the construction of a narrative obscure the truth? Two political fictions prove that the construction (or reclaiming) of narrative is not only important toward discovering a “truth of cinema,” as Rouch sought, but it is essential — it does not, as some hardline documentary purists believe, obscure the essential truths of the work. Narimane Mari’s “Bloody Beans” (2013) is a fascinating restaging of the Algerian War for Independence through a cast of children, whose “Lord of the Flies”-style existence transforms into a “Battle of Algiers.” But “Bloody Beans” never loses its sense of freeform excitement, and the film moves from one scene to the next as if it’s floating in the waves of the beach where the children play, as if the film was actually made by the children. “The Silent Majority Speaks” (2010), a polyphonic portrait of Iran’s long struggle against repression, reclaims the use of images within political struggle. The film, making its North American premiere, was initially credited to the Silent Collective, and reconstructs intertwined narratives: street level action and reaction among the Iranian people following the corrupt 2009 presidential elections, mostly filmed with hidden cameras, along with essayistic asides detailing the country’s long history of unrest. Filmmaker Bani Khoshnoudi has recently revealed herself to be the director behind the film, and according to the program notes, she will introduce the film in her first public appearance since the disclosure. Nicolas Provost’s “Plot Point Trilogy” (2007-12) clandestinely collects imagery as well, but with a much different result. Using footage collected in public places — Times Square, Las Vegas, and Tokyo — Provost then weaves these images into tense and often hilarious narratives that reinforce and mock the codes of traditional narrative cinema. Amie Siegel’s “Black Moon” (2010), screening along with other recent works, uses the conventions of narrative cinema as a loose frame for her hypnotic film about a group of armed female revolutionaries traversing a barren and destroyed landscape. That landscape, however, is not a post-apocalyptic future but the boarded-up and foreclosed housing developments of the present, and the film ingeniously collapses the genre modes and the documentary realism, resulting in something that feels not of an imagined future but of the immediate now. Part of the excitement of “Art of the Real” is in the many directions it can take the viewer. These are just a few of the many, and there are still numerous avenues to explore. Each one is exciting and challenging and new. When people still confusingly talk about the culture of cinema being dead, we now have something to point toward to prove their view is limited. Cinema is not dead but to my eyes just being born, and “Art of the Real” creates the template to keep asking questions, the questions that will keep the cinema alive.  Published: April 11, 2014 Read full article here

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