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Sergei Tcherepnin at MIT List Visual Arts Center
14/10/2014
Artist: Sergei Tcherepnin Venue: MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge Curated by: Alise Upitis Date: July 15 – October 19, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of videos, images, press release and link available after the jump. Videos: Excerpts from forthcoming UNITED BROTHERS film ICH BIN EIN ANDROID with film prop made by Jessie Stead. Videos […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

John Stezaker Loses Control at Petzel
14/10/2014
“Women’s hair is a problem,” said John Stezaker, walking me through his latest exhibition at Petzel in New York (through November 8), which contains a new series of large-scale silkscreen-on-black-canvas paintings adapted from film stills. “It’s amorphous, it’s all sorts of strange shapes. So the only women I could use are ones with very specific coifs.” Outlines and contours are important to these works because Stezaker has excised the main figures, leaving their silhouettes (and the shadows the actors originally cast on the image’s background). The 65-year-old British artist is perhaps best known for his collage works that jam together conflicting images — natural landscapes, or trains, layered over human faces — as well as a series, titled “Marriage,” for which he creates fictional hermaphrodites by folding together portraits of male and female actors. But “removal — taking things away, is one of the strategies in my work,” Stezaker clarified, and has been for quite some time. It’s tempting to read a narrative into these silk-screens — the police interrogation! A violent scuffle! A man and a woman confronting their dying romance! — but Stezaker is against that sort of thing. “My work is about removing images from those kind of readings,” he said, “taking them out of that context of legibility and trying [to] confront what’s left of the image when it’s drained of signifiers.” The basic contours of this latest series, the artist said, were fleshed out in a 1989 piece. That silkscreen was based on a film still depicting young children and their parents; Stezaker blotted out the parents. Scale itself has waxed and waned over the artist’s career; in comparative terms, these new works are huge. Stezaker, back in the late ’70s, received a fan letter from recent art-school grad Sherrie Levine, who wrote that she and her friend Richard Prince had noticed his work in a magazine and found it interesting. “[They said] if I was ever in New York to pop in and join the discussion,” Stezaker recalled. “It was my first positive feedback — I almost caught the next plane!” During that pivotal visit he remembers the impressive scale that young artists like Robert Longo were working on; he also visited the Museum of Modern Art and found himself floored by the physical dimensions of Barnett Newman’s paintings. “I went back to England desperate to start working on that scale,” he said. And he did, until life intervened: Stezaker hurt his back, which made silk-screening difficult; he started teaching and suddenly “small-scale suited working on the evenings and weekends.” In many ways this new exhibition is a return to larger form and also, he said, a way to visually compete with the vastness of Petzel’s relatively new exhibition space on West 18th Street. (The viewing room at the gallery does hold a series of recent, intimate collages, made from cutting and layering two different film stills atop each other.) Picasso, oddly enough, also had an effect on these larger silhouette works — or at least what Stezaker termed the “bodily scale, that sense of bodily presence” in Picasso. In some ways, the silhouettes allow the viewer to enter into the painting, to fill that emptied-out role. The exhibition changes gears quite abruptly with a 2014 film, “Blind,” that gets its New York debut here. It’s a 90-second loop composed of nearly 2,000 film stills from Stezaker’s archives, each flashed on screen for a mere 1/24th of a second. Its part of a series of films the artist has made by combining stills of varying types: He’s got one about horses, one about churches, one about large, German crowds. “Blind” isn’t thematic — there’s no underlying connection between any of these images — and it’s actually the result of a fortuitous mistake. Stezaker had gone through his archive, placing stills into two boxes — one to scan for the film, one to skip. “Anything with text or color was out,” he said. “I had all sorts of ideas — I had conceived it as black-and-white. But the person who was scanning them happened to be Brazilian, and her English wasn’t very good. She thought the box I wanted scanned was the one I didn’t want scanned. When it came back it was unbelievably beautiful.” Letting yourself get absorbed by “Blind” is a disorienting experience. There’s no real way of knowing how long the film is, before it loops; you see things but can’t really explain what they are (or if they’re even there). Stezaker said that he originally intended the film to be purely abstract, since technically the brain isn’t able to process images at 1/24th of a second — but then he found out that this is somewhat of a fallacy, since flashes and snippets of imagery are indeed retained. “Everyone sees something different,” he said. When Stezaker screened an early cut for Jack Miller, his dealer with the Approach in London, Miller approved, but said he was “concerned about all the swastikas.” They went back through the thousands of stills and indeed found some Nazi imagery — but it was a mere eight stills in total, which somehow Miller’s brain had processed in the blur of images. Gisela Capitain, Stezaker’s Cologne gallerist, was one of the next advance viewers. “She said, ‘It’s strange, the way the nudity stands out,’” Stezaker recounted. “And there was no nudity — these are 1940s, ’50s [stills], there’s no nudity in films of that period. That’s when it first began to click: everyone does see something different, because it’s operating beneath the conscious radar of ordinary perception. What you’re seeing is going directly to your brain.” Not everyone is happy with his recent film-collage experiments, Stezaker admitted. “My work is generally very contemplative, and about stillness, halting the image,” he said. “This is about violence, and mobility, and the incessant cinematic image: Too-muchness.” As a counterbalance to his usual working methods — grappling with the source material, changing it or obfuscating it, redirecting its potential meanings — “Blind” was an exercise in abandon. “Every time I look at this film, I see a different film, and I find that disconcerting,” he said. “I’m a control freak.”   John Stezaker Loses Control at PetzelSelect Photo Gallery: Slideshow: John Stezaker's New Silkscreens at Petzel GalleryPublished: October 14, 2014 Read full article here

Kate Moss Makes Gun Art, Bloomberg's Artist Grant Challenge, and More
14/10/2014
Kate Moss Makes Gun Art, Bloomberg's Artist Grant Challenge, and More— Kate Moss Designs Gun Art: Supermodel Kate Moss, along with Sam Taylor-Johnson, Yinka Shonibare, and others have designed artworks from decommissioned American assault rifles to benefit world peace non-profit Peace One Day. Curated by artist Jake Chapman, the pieces are on view at London’s Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) just in time for Frieze. [Independent] — Bloomberg’s Artist Grant Challenge: Bloomberg Philanthropies is kicking off a new grant project called “Public Art Challenge.” The program will choose three cities to receive to $1 million each for mounting public art projects. According to Bloomberg, the projects should “celebrate creativity, enhance urban identity, encourage public-private partnerships, and drive economic development.” [NYT] — The Louvre Abu Dhabi’s Impressive Haul: When the Louvre Abu Dhabi opens in December 2015, it will boast more than 300 works from French museums, including Claude Monet’s “Saint Lazare Station,” Andy Warhol’s “Big Electric Chair,” and Leonardo Da Vinci’s “Portrait of and Unknown Woman,” as well as other important works by the likes of Vincent Van Gogh and Henri Matisse. All of the pieces will remain a part of the museum’s permanent collection. Meanwhile, back at the original Louvre, Beyoncé, Jay Z, and Blue Ivy cleared out the museum to take selfies with the “Mona Lisa.” [Guardian, Vibe] — Kunstmuseum Bern Flip-Flops on Gurlitt Trove: Despite mass-circulated premature reports by a Swiss newspaper, the Kunstmuseum Bern is not yet ready to accept Cornelius Gurlitt’s controversial collection; the Kunstmuseum tweeted on Monday that they would have a decision in place by the end of November. [Times of Israel, Art Market Monitor] — ArtPrize Winner Sweeps Both Categories: Pakistan-born and Indianapolis-based installation artist Anila Quayyum Agha is the first-ever artist to take both of ArtPrize’s grand prizes (the jury vote and the popular vote), garnering a total of $300,000. [Hyperallergic] — Street Art for Sale: Mysterious (and eyeroll-worthy) broker “Wall-(m)-Art” has begun selling and subsequently framing the street art of New York City — available for purchase at “newyorkcitywallmart.com” — in an attempt to let “vandalism [get] vandalized.” [Village Voice] — In other street art news, someone has spraypainted a penis on that piece that Banksy just put up in the English town of Folkestone. [Telegraph] — Apparently white paintings are really hot at auction right now. [Telegraph] — The Times has a cute photo essay for which photographers, including Vik Muniz and Catherine Opie, took pictures of their children in their rooms. [NYT]  Published: October 14, 2014 Read full article here

Paul Lee at Maccarone
14/10/2014
Artist: Paul Lee Venue: Maccarone, New York Exhibition Title: Matinee Date: September 16 – October 18, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: Images courtesy of the artist and Maccarone, New York. Press Release: Maccarone is pleased to announce a showing of new two-dimensional works by […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Bettina - Photography Exhibition
14/10/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Tags: Jacques FathBettinaChristian DiorHubert de GivenchyAuthor(s): Sonia Kolesnikov-JessopSub-Channels: ExhibitionsShort Title : Bettina - Photography Exhibition Read full article here

Heritage Under Stress in Syria
14/10/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Archana Khare-GhoseSub-Channels: ArchitectureShort Title : Heritage Devastated Read full article here

Christie’s Kicks Off Frieze With the Essl Collection
14/10/2014
Christie’s Kicks Off Frieze With the Essl CollectionLONDON — Christie’s kicked off events for Frieze Week with what it said was London’s most valuable auction ever of a private post-war and contemporary art collection. Sales came to £46.9 million, or $75.3 million, as 43 works were offered from the Essl Collection of contemporary art in Austria. The event featured works by German masters such as Gerhard Richter, Sigmar Polke, Georg Baselitz, and Martin Kippenberger, as well as international artists such as Cindy Sherman, Frank Stella, and Louise Bourgeois. The top lot was a Richter 1970 four-panel picture of the sky, “Wolken (Fenster)” or “Clouds (Window).” The large work, a detailed piece of photorealism of the evening sky, made £6.2 million with premium, a price between its hammer-price estimates of £5 million and £7 million. Another Richter, an abstract titled “Netz,” failed to sell in the public sale against an upper estimate put at £10 million, and was sold afterwards for £5.5 million, Christie’s said. “Indian With Eagle,” a 1975 portrait by Polke, more than doubled its £2 million top estimate to sell for £5.1 million. The auction had been estimated to make as much as £56.8 million. Karlheinz Essl, the founder of Austrian hardware store chain BauMax Holding AG, built up the collection over 50 years. “Although it is not easy for us to part from these works, I am delighted that Christie’s has found buyers who will enjoy them as much as my wife Agnes and I did,” Karlheinz Essl said in a statement. “We are equally delighted that through the proceeds of this sale, the long-term future of the Essl Museum is now secured.” The gallery, in Klosterneuburg, Vienna, has more than 7,000 artworks. “In a month of retrospectives of Anselm Kiefer and Sigmar Polke in London, it was great to see outstanding prices achieved for Polke and Baselitz, which confirmed the growing market confidence in German post-war art,” said Francis Outred, chairman and head of post-war and contemporary art at Christie’s. The week also includes Frieze Art Fair and other sales by Christies, Sotheby’s, Phillips, and Bonhams. Published: October 13, 2014 Read full article here

Ken Okiishi at Mathew
13/10/2014
  Artist: Ken Okiishi Venue: Mathew, Berlin Exhibition Title: Eggleston und Andere, “reality bites” Date: September 16 – October, 18 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: Images courtesy of Mathew, Berlin. Press Release: Okiishi continues his formal and conceptual investigation of a cluster of preoccupations: […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Jenny Holzer at Cheim & Reid
13/10/2014
Artist: Jenny Holzer Venue: Cheim & Reid, New York Exhibition Title: Dust Paintings Date: September 11 – October 25, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: Images courtesy of the artist and Cheim & Reid, New York. Press Release: Cheim & Read is pleased to […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

A Weird Trip With Mushrooms, Painting Raccoons, and Kitty Litter
13/10/2014
Let’s be clear: “Spaced Out: Migration to the Interior” isn’t just a show about drugged-out art, but there are plenty of references to magic mushrooms, as well as a furry pink carpet covering much of the floor (well, the parts of the floor not taken up by one of Jim Lambie’s overpowering striped-rainbow installations). For chrissakes there’s a huge painting of raccoons wielding paintbrushes, courtesy of Peter Saul, so clearly we’re in slightly inebriated territory. The exhibition — curated by Phong Bui and Rail Curatorial Projects, and hosted in Red Bull Studios New York’s massive, bi-level space through December 14 — is a wild and colorful journey into another dimension. And like any such trip, there’s bound to be occasional slippages into the dark side (a motorized sculpture by Jon Kessler, which features an amputated, plug-pierced ear emitting bubbles, does that job nicely). “Spaced Out” includes a lot of painting, much of it exuberant, abstract, and highly patterned: Keltie Ferris, Tamara Gonzales, James Siena, and Chris Martin (who concurrently has a very glittery show over at Anton Kern Gallery). The sculptural inclusions in the show tend toward the very modest (a tiny cricket cage carved from human bone by Charles LeDray; one of Robert Gober’s phallic-beeswax candles) to the monumental (a goofy, metallic bust by Ugo Rondinone, which lords over the main gallery space with a shit-eating grin on its vacant face). Brooklyn artist Fred Tomaselli —  who is readily associated with an interest in mind-expansion, and who has occasionally used drugs as a medium — has an amazing older piece in the basement level. “Geology Lesson,” 1986, is a desk whose top is covered with dozens of tiny, upward-facing speakers, each filled with a few pinches of cat litter; tap a button and the speakers come to life, emitting a growing tone whose vibrations cause the litter to shiver and bounce. The sculpture is a marvel of lo-fi special effect. Will Ryman — an artist whose paintbrush-mazes and nail-birds have never particularly thrilled me — also has a stunner in this exhibition: “Infinity,” 2014, a cheeky-and-creepy homage to Yayoi Kusama’s light-filled rooms, except this one’s walls, ceiling, and floor are covered with child-sized sneakers. It’s an immersive little den within the hyper-real immersive environment that Bui and his Brooklyn Rail cohorts have transformed the entire space into: A celebration of the proudly nonsensical, drug-addled or otherwise.  A Weird Trip With Mushrooms, Painting Raccoons, and Kitty LitterSelect Photo Gallery: Slideshow: "Spaced Out - Migration To The Interior"Published: October 13, 2014 Read full article here

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