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Highlights From the Łódź Design Festival
17/10/2014
ŁÓDŹ, Poland — The international design community probably doesn’t need to learn to pronounce the name of this central Polish city before recognizing the creativity of its emerging talents. But those diacritical marks haven’t stopped a community of young designers and domestic manufacturers from convening here every year since 2007 for the Łódź Design Festival, on view through October 19. Yet given the concentration of local talent at Art_Inkubator, a former factory site where ŁDF is currently under way, it makes sense to start polishing (no pun intended) your Polish. Remember: It’s pronounced Woo-ch. And while the middle of Poland doesn’t stand to enter the Italy-Netherlands-Scandinavia-Japan cosmology of modern and contemporary design, there’s still plenty of reason to pay attention (and a visit) to Łódź. Below, we’ve rounded up the most interesting exhibits on view this year in Łódź. Make Me! Design Competition Some of the strongest displays belong to the Make me! competition, held annually at ŁDF for work created by designers under 35. Though pieces from contestants based outside of Poland are featured here, the majority of the 21 contestants are Polish designers (selected from a pool of 247 applicants), many of whom work with Polish manufacturers. As such, the competition offers an engrossing introduction to the contemporary design world in Poland. The offerings range from the witty — human-scale doll furniture by Slovak designer Silvia Lovasova — to the inventively functional — a bicycle grip that cools the rider’s palms by the Warsaw studio Frivolous With Industry (Justyna Strociak and Magda Gasiorowska). The winning design is an algae-based ink that prints onto fabrics by Berlin studio Blond & Bieber. The studio’s founders created a movable textile printer that also makes the dyes it distributes onto fabric. Brave Fixed World The theme of this year’s ŁDF, Brave New World, is expanded at British curator Daniel Charny’s exhibition Brave Fixed World. With the maker movement having already overtaken the design world, Charny’s display suggests that a “fixer” movement should come next. With so many things having been made, some of them surely need fixing, Charny seems to suggest. This section features various prototypes for a fixer hub, a space where citizens with handicraft skills can meet to repair broken objects, or refashion them into different things altogether. There are models for libraries, gallery spaces, and documentation of the relatively few fix hubs that are currently in operation. With the movement’s emphasis on collectivity, it naturally comes with a Repair Manifesto: “If you can’t fix it, you don’t own it,” reads the first “self-evident” tenet. Taste of an Object Located inside the Museum of the City of Łódź, this exhibition, which premiered at Milan Design Week last April, pairs design objects with foodstuffs devised specifically to render edible the material qualities of design. It’s an unorthodox, highly visceral approach to design display, one that might do well far beyond Milan and Łódź. The geographical focus here is rather narrow — only designers from northern Poland are on display — but the objects and tastes presented are quite diverse. An aluminum chair designed by the Tabanda Group is paired with chocolate bark, which, according to curator Jacub Razy, has a flat exterior and a semi-solid interior just like the metal. While it doesn’t necessarily explain the geographical or cultural context from which these objects emerge, the point here isn’t cultural specificity. Rather, Razy insists that language isn’t really the best way to understand industrial design. Food, like furniture, is after all an almost universal human need. Highlights From the Łódź Design FestivalSelect Photo Gallery: Slideshow: Highlights From the Łódź Design FestivalPublished: October 17, 2014 Read full article here

Richard Tuttle: I Don’t Know, Or The Weave of Textile Language / Tate Modern Turbine Hall
17/10/2014
For Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall the American sculptor and poet Richard Tuttle has created a large-scale sculptural installation, the largest ... Read full article here

Doig’s Tropical Painting Leads Christie’s Big Frieze-Week Sale
17/10/2014
LONDON—After its Essl Collection sale on Monday kicked off the Frieze-week frenzy, Christie’s returned on Thursday night with its main event of the week. Peter Doig’s first tropical painting led a carefully edited postwar and contemporary auction. The house tried to catch the prevailing mood favoring young artists—like the many being exhibited at this week’s fairs—and the German masters now on view in many of the British capital’s biggest galleries. Still, the top lot was Doig’s “The Heart of Old San Juan,” dating from 1999, showing an emerald-green basketball court by the sea. The tranquil painting attracted some interest in the salesroom and sold for £4.56 million (about $7.26 million). It had been estimated at £4 million to £6 million. The work marked a shift away from Doig’s images of snowy Canada. The Christie’s sale coincided with major exhibitions of German art in London—Anselm Kiefer at the Royal Academy of Art and Sigmar Polke at Tate Modern. Gallery openings this week included Marian Goodman’s first London space, showing Gerhard Richter works. The auction included these artists as well as other German painters. Richter, now 82, was much in demand at Christie’s in King Street; his blurred rainforest landscape, “Waldstuck (Chile),” sold for £4.45 million. “Fiktion (Garten),” or “Fiction (Garden),” made £2.21 million, while one of Richter’s “Abstraktes Bild” works made £1.87 million and another abstract was knocked down at £1.2 million. Only one of the artist’s six works on offer failed to sell, against a $1.5 million estimate. Another Richter, “Netz,” failed to sell on Oct. 13 in the Essl Collection sale. Jean-Michel Basquiat’s “Love Dub for A” made £4.34 million and was bought by an American buyer, with an estimate of £4 million to £6 million. The cartoon-like piece from 1987 is a billboard-sized tribute to Basquiat’s friend and mentor Andy Warhol, who had died unexpectedly in February of that year. The two had a close and competitive relationship. Prices for Basquiat, who created 800 paintings before dying himself at the age of 27 in 1988, continue to hold strong. His “Infantry” made £2.43 million. Tracey Emin’s “Mad Tracey From Margate Everybody’s Been There” sold for £722,500. This applique blanket, with personal symbols, was estimated at £700,000 to £1 million following the sale of “My Bed” at Christie’s last July. The blanket was made in 1997, the year she appeared in the Sensation exhibition of Young British Artists at the Royal Academy of Arts. Juan Muñoz’s “Conversation Piece I” went under the hammer for £2.32 million. The artist (1953-2001) had created four bronze figures with similar forms that appear to be in conversation with each other. Christie’s said that it was acquired by a European private buyer. A trademark seascape by the Japanese photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto, this one titled “Aegean Sea, Pilion,” sold for a mid-estimate £242,500. The artist has become more in demand after one of his minimalist images in the series, showing Lake Constance, was used as the cover image of the “No Line on the Horizon” album by Irish rock band U2 in 2009. The post-war and contemporary sale raised a total of £40.34 million including buyer’s premiums, with 41 of 46 lots sold. Collectors were prepared to pay £4 million or more for top works and were selective about some others, dealers said. Francis Outred, International Director and Head of Post-War & Contemporary Art, Christie’s Europe, said it was “one of the most packed auction rooms I have ever witnessed.” The evening continued with a £27.58 million Italian sale, with the highlight being a metal column by Alighiero Boetti (1940-1994) that set an artist’s record of £2.43 million. The buyer was American. Christie’s totaled the night’s events at some £67.9 million—or £114.7 million for the week including Essl, a record for October evening auctions. Christie’s said the £46.9 million sale of 43 works from the Essl Collection on Monday was London’s most valuable auction ever of a private post-war and contemporary art collection. This was followed by the VIP day of the Frieze Art Fair, where works by Pablo Picasso, Polke and Damien Hirst were among the early sales. Frieze was boosted by higher demand, dealers said, as well as the Frieze Masters event and satellite fairs. A large-scale Christopher Wool painting fetched the top price at the inaugural auction by Phillips at its new London headquarters building in Berkeley Square on Wednesday, and events wind down with sales at Sotheby’s and Bonhams on Friday night. Doig’s Tropical Painting Leads Christie’s Big Frieze-Week SaleSelect Photo Gallery: Christie's Contemporary Evening London Auction, October 16, 2014Published: October 16, 2014 Read full article here

Slideshow: Highlights From the Łódź Design Festival
16/10/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Benjamin ParkSub-Channels: DesignShort Title : Slideshow:Highlights From the Łódź Design Festival Read full article here

New York
16/10/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.belenky.comDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: SohoLocation Phone: +1 212 674 4242Admissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

Canadian Experimental Filmmaker Barbara Sternberg On “Far From”
16/10/2014
Canadian Experimental Filmmaker Barbara Sternberg On “Far From”Watching “Far From,” the latest work from Canadian experimental filmmaker Barbara Sternberg, feels like taking a journey through the past, each step deeper and deeper into a dense fog. Sternberg, who has been making films since the mid-1970s and has screened all around the world, constructed her most recent work around a musical theme of the nocturne, giving her a loose structure to move around in while allowing herself the freedom to reject linearity through the use of repetition and free association. The deeply evocative layers of the film, created with the help of an optical printer, allow new configurations of images — blocks of text that quickly slash across the frame, bubbles of light, a solitary figure in a forest or a child spinning around in the street — to emerge in a sea of midnight black and twilight blue. Despite their recollection of the dream-state, Sternberg, in a recent conversation with ARTINFO, was quick to point out that her films are not autobiographical. “The films are about where I’m at in that point of my life, but I have no desire to make films about me,” Sternberg said. The Origins of “Far From” “It had been ongoing. I have been taken with dark paintings, and looking at them and saying, how can a painter just barely suggest something. That really appealed to me, and I wondered if I could achieve something like that with film. So it started from an interest in a visual thing rather than an interest in a particular idea or theme. Most of my films have to do with how we experience the world, how we perceive reality, but this one really was motivated by this interest in painting. The other intent in the film was to allow myself to treat the material just like visual material and create a film like you would create music. So, you’d have a musical theme — or in this case a visual piece of footage — and then treat it through repetition, alteration, the way music does. I was after those two things: visually like a dark painting and put together like a piece of music.” Working With Layers “I wasn’t interested in dark just for the hell of it. I was after something more similar to how I’ve approached film all along, in layers. But this time I was thinking that I would make something dark by building up layers and layers of film, not by shooting something in the dark. Those accumulated layers are analogous to years and years and years of living. So in that sense, it’s very similar to a lot of my other films: the concern with time, how we’re not simply in the present moment all of the time.” It’s All About the Medium “All I do in the films has something to do with film, and I think that film has many ways that it’s analogous to our perception of life — light, vision, time, all those things are built into film. That’s been there in all my films.” Working in the Shadows “I used to think that being female and being Canadian and being an experimental filmmaker were all similar. I think if you’re an experimental filmmaker you make the work regardless of its reception. The motivation is really pure, you just make the work because you care about the medium and you want to express something in that medium. Sometimes it’s frustrating when I see the history of experimental film, and Canadians, except for Michael Snow, are omitted from that. I don’t think it’s affected me in making my work. You can get down a little bit from being ignored, but somehow you make work anyway.” “Far From,” along with work from Clint Enns, Alexandra Cuesta, and the structural films of Kurt Kren, will screen at Toronto’s TIFF Bell Lightbox on October 17.   A still from Barbara Sternberg's "Far From" (2014) / Courtesy of CFMDC Published: October 16, 2014 Read full article here

Baryshnikov Arts Center
16/10/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: Baryshnikov Arts CenterLocation Email: info@bacnyc.orgDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: ChelseaMonday - Close: 12:00amTuesday - Open: 12:00amTuesday - Close: 12:00amWednesday - Open: 12:00amWednesday - Close: 12:00amThursday - Open: 12:00amThursday - Close: 12:00amFriday - Open: 12:00amFriday - Close: 12:00amLocation Phone: + 646 731 3200Saturday - Open: 12:00amSaturday - Close: 12:00amSunday - Open: 12:00amSunday - Close: 12:00amMonday - Open: 12:00amHas Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

New York
16/10/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.barryfriedmanltd.comFacebook Website: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Barry-Friedman-Ltd/338484065420Location Email: contact@barryfriedmanltd.comLast name: FriedmanEmail: contact@barryfriedmanltd.comPhone: (212) 239-8600Brief info:     Barry Friedman Ltd. has been an important presence in the international art market for the past 40 years, bringing 20th century European fine and decorative art works to the attention of the American audience. The gallery presents 6-8 exhibitions a year featuring contemporary art, cutting-edge furniture, studio glass, ceramics, and photography. Additionally, we deal in avant-garde painting, works on paper and sculpture from 1900-1940; vintage photography.   Landmark exhibitions presented by Barry Friedman Ltd. have included: Venice. 3 Vision in Glass: Cristiano Bianchin, Yoichi Ohira, Laura de Santillana (traveling to Nelson Atkins Museum, Kansas City; Naples Museum of Art, Florida; Musée des Arts décoratifs, Paris); Ron Arad: A Retrospective Exhibition 1981-2004; Yoichi Ohira: A Phenomenon in Glass; Emergence: Early American Studio Glass & Its Influences: 1964-1989; Fernand Khnopff and the Belgian Avant-garde; Tamara de Lempicka; Bernard Boutet de Monvel; Mackintosh to Mollino: Fifty Years of Chair Design; The Bauhaus: Masters & Students; Gerrit Rietveld: A Centenary Exhibition; Design Italian Style (furniture of Carlo Mollino and Carlo Graffi and important Italian glass), and numerous important photography exhibitions.  Display: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: ChelseaMonday - Close: 12:00amTuesday - Open: 12:00amTuesday - Close: 12:00amWednesday - Open: 12:00amWednesday - Close: 12:00amThursday - Open: 12:00amThursday - Close: 12:00amFriday - Open: 12:00amFriday - Close: 12:00amLocation Phone: t +1 212 239 8600 Saturday - Open: 12:00amSaturday - Close: 12:00amSunday - Open: 12:00amSunday - Close: 12:00amMonday - Open: 12:00amHas Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: By appointment onlyArtists: Kumi YamashitaWarren IsenseeBernard CohenStephen ChambersAnthony EarnshawAlan GoukMichael KidnerPeter HowsonDavid HepherNeil JeffriesJohn KeaneEduardo PaolozziTrevor SuttonPaul NeaguJohn LokerRenny TaitReeve SchleyMelissa MeyerFrancesco Patriarcalocation fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: New York / Northeast Read full article here

New York
16/10/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.baronboisante.comDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: Greenwich VillageLocation Phone: +1 212 924 9940Admissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: By Appointment Onlylocation fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

New York
16/10/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: Display: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: SeventiesLocation Phone: + 212 737 3775Admissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

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