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New York
25/09/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: Display: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: Newbury StreetLocation Phone: + 212 517 5366Admissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

New York
25/09/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: Display: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: ChelseaLocation Phone: 917 463 3901Admissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: 12-6 Wednesday through Saturday<br />1-6 Sunday<br />and by appointment<br />location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

New York
25/09/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.alexandergray.comDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: ChelseaMonday - Close: 12:00amTuesday - Open: 12:00amTuesday - Close: 12:00amWednesday - Open: 12:00amWednesday - Close: 12:00amThursday - Open: 12:00amThursday - Close: 12:00amFriday - Open: 12:00amFriday - Close: 12:00amLocation Phone: +1 212 399 2636Saturday - Open: 12:00amSaturday - Close: 12:00amSunday - Open: 12:00amSunday - Close: 12:00amMonday - Open: 12:00amHas Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

New York
25/09/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: Display: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: SeventiesLocation Phone: + 212 737 4230Admissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

New York
25/09/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.alianzaonline.orgDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: Eighties & AboveLocation Phone: +1 212 740 1960Admissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: Tuesday to Saturday 11AM to 6PM<br />Or by appointmentlocation fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

Brooklyn
25/09/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: Display: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: WilliamsburgLocation Phone: +1 718 599 3044Admissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

ICP Moves to the Bowery, Human Zoo Shuttered in London, and More
25/09/2014
ICP Moves to the Bowery, Human Zoo Shuttered in London, and More— ICP Moves to the Bowery: The International Center of Photography, whose lease in Midtown ends next year, will relocate to a building on the Bowery, near the New Museum. “This location provides a real frontage so that we can have a direct dialogue with the street, and that’s key to our mission going forward,” said executive director Mark Lubell. The new location should be ready to host works by mid-2015. [NYT] — Human Zoo Shuttered in London: South African theater director Brett Bailey’s recreation of a 19th-century human zoo has been cancelled in London after large protests outside the Barbican, where it was on view. The work, which features caged black actors, has been accused of being racist. “It became impossible for us to continue with the show because of the extreme nature of the protest and the serious threat to the safety of performers, audiences and staff,” read a statement released by the Barbican. “We find it profoundly troubling that such methods have been used to silence artists and performers and that audiences have been denied the opportunity to see this important work.” [NYT] ​— Gehry’s Eisenhower Design Prevails: After much controversy and vote-stalling, the Eisenhower Memorial Commission has finally decided to present Frank Gehry’s design to the National Capital Planning Commission next month. The decision was announced concurrently with the resignation of 13-year committee member Senator Jerry Moran. “Senator Moran’s ongoing support for the inclusion of Kansas [in the memorial] has led him to conclude that this stance is blocking a memorial to President Eisenhower from completion,” said Garette Silverman, Moran’s communications director. [Washington Post] — JR Takes Ellis Island: Here’s a look at JR’s Ellis Island show, for which he installed historic photos of immigrants in an abandoned hospital on the island. [NYT] — Pyramid Troubles: UNESCO has requested a report from Egypt on a 4,600-year-old pyramid after concerns were raised that it was damaged during restoration. [AFP] — Crowdfunding Performance: The Delfina Foundation in London is launching a crowdfunding campaign as part of an initiative to research Arab performance art. [TAN] ​— In the wake of Sandro Miller casting John Malkovich in iconic celebrity photos, Rowan Atkinson (AKA, Mr. Bean) has been inserted into historic portraits. [Artnet] ​— The ninth Berlin Biennale has tapped New York art collective DIS as its curatorial team. [Artforum] ​— After lining up four deacquisitions in March, the Delaware Art Museum is ready to pay off its $19.8 million debt. [Washington Times] ALSO ON ARTINFO Marlborough Chelsea Puts the Boogie in Broadway 5 Must-See Gallery Shows: Daria Irincheeva, Jim Shaw, and More MIT Media Lab's Nicholas Negroponte Offers Keynote Address at Blouin Creative Leadership Summit Check our blog IN THE AIR for breaking news throughout the day. Published: September 25, 2014 Read full article here

Performing Arts Pick: Glen E. Friedman's "My Rules"
25/09/2014
Performing Arts Pick: Glen E. Friedman's "My Rules"It’s seems an insult that the work of photographer Glen E. Friedman isn’t more well known. The style of image he pioneered — a wide-eyed and wide-angled directness, at once natural and posed — is taken for granted in our popular culture, which has boldly ripped him off with very little credit. Take a look at any promotional photo of a band and you’ll surely find an antecedent in Friedman’s photographs of punk and hip-hop groups over the last three decades. Friedman began taking photos of the people around him, mainly skateboarders in Los Angeles in the early ’80s, and in many ways his heroic snapshots of kids floating through the air in and out of drained swimming pools remain the defining images of that sport. Soon after, he started taking photos of local punk bands. Those seminal images — of groups like Black Flag, Bad Brains, and Minor Threat — helped define the identity of that period, depicting the raw energy of live shows and the do-it-yourself ethos. Later, he captured some of the same energy with his images of the earliest popular hip-hop groups associated with Def Jam Records, including the Beastie Boys, Run-DMC, and most famously, Public Enemy.  Cover art for "My Rules" / Courtesy of Rizzoli Publications “My Rules,” Friedman’s new book published by Rizzoli, takes its name from his earliest photo zine and is a trip down memory lane, collecting many of Friedman’s most memorable images throughout his life, bridging the countercultures of punk/hip-hop and skateboarding, fused by their confrontational styles. Interspersed between the clusters of images are recollections from some of Friedman’s collaborators and subjects, including rapper Chuck D of Public Enemy, former Black Flag singer Henry Rollins, and the artist Shepard Fairey, who collaborated on the design of the book with Friedman.  Published: September 25, 2014 Read full article here

5 Must-See Gallery Shows: Daria Irincheeva, Jim Shaw, and More
25/09/2014
“Two Two One” at Regina Rex, through October 26 (221 Madison Street) The gallery, recently transplanted from Brooklyn, opened with a bang this weekend: A jam-packed four-person that began at the entrance (with altered storefront signage by David Stein) and continued into a back courtyard, where Corey Escoto spelled out a cryptic text using 3M reflective letters (Sample: “He would come to paint the expression of true regret. Many of his friends were already doing the same.”) Inside, massive found-material assemblages by Dave Hardy were crammed between floor and ceiling, incorporating foam, cement, glass panels, and other materials; the busy artist also has a solo exhibition on view through November 1 at Churner & Churner in Chelsea. EJ Hauser gets an entire side room for a series of paintings based on simple forms — shields and piles — conjuring quasi-familiar icons through layers of oil. Simultaneously, the curatorial brains behind Harbor present a packed back room of smaller-scale, mostly-affordable works from dozens of artists (I overheard someone jokingly referring to it as the “gift shop,” and it is indeed tough to leave without wanting to take something home).  Jim Shaw at Metro Pictures, through October 25 (519 West 24th Street) This painting exhibition from Shaw, who was formerly a cohort in Destroy All Monsters with the late Mike Kelley, is a brain-battering series of surrealistic giggles and eerie tableaux, all expertly rendered in a variety of styles (oftentimes more than one in a single canvas). Mermaids, river landscapes, wig-wearing tanks, the Land O’Lakes mascot, and the Seven Dwarves all share space in this hermetic world, but even if man-headed chickens and martyrs stabbed with trains aren’t your thing, it’s a joy just to observe Shaw’s sick talents as a draftsman. Daria Irincheeva at Postmasters, through October 11 (54 Franklin Street) Rocking an increasingly popular Home Depot aesthetic — wood slats, tile and paint-chip samples, bubble wrap — for collage-in-space assemblages and sculptures, Ireencheeva turns the gallery into a sort of laboratory. Faux-wood contact paper is put to good use: in “Morning Composition 072” it coats the floor, giving the illusion of illumination, and “Remembered Something at 5pm” is basically a long length of the material (the kind of stuff you buy at the 99-cent store to cover your cabinet interiors) tumbling down the wall. “Gazing At Fish-tank at 7pm” is a diptych that more directly engages with painting (or what you’ve got when you strip the painting away, add some framing wood and colored paper, and then leave with the job halfway done). Irincheeva is one to watch; it’s not easy to be this interesting with such simple means. Cajsa von Zeipel at Capricious 88, through November 2 (88 Eldridge Street) Citing a humorous pair of influences — Pieter Bruegel and Tom of Finland — this young Swedish artist crafts erotic giantesses out of Styrofoam, fiberglass, Aqua Resin, and plaster. Their eyes have holes bored into them, their lips are bee-stung and swollen, but they seem to be having a fairly good time strutting, pole-dancing, wrestling, and tottering on insanely high platform shoes. Bone-white and ghostly, the figures exude an almost violent confidence; postures of seduction are belied by fierce expressions, which suggest they’re doing perfectly well on their own, thank you very much. There’s a lone dude among the bunch, in a work titled “The Penalty of Bum-bouncing”; he loafs, ignored, cooly checking out his reflection on the wall.   “FIRE!” at Venus Over Manhattan, through November 1 (980 Madison Ave) Curated by de Pury de Pury, this exhibition surveys the current ceramics scene, which can best be described using the phrase “heating up” and other kiln-related puns. The variety of work is impressively awesome, from the humorous (Friedrich Kunath’s floating walruses) to the imposing (Rosemarie Trockel, who has a gnarly ceramic hanging over the front desk). Much of the work abides by the mandate “Wonky is better!,” a time-honored edict that I have just made up: Sterling Ruby’s lumpy pits; Takuro Kuwata’s cracked, bulging mistakes; Cameron Jamie’s coral-like, warty wall pieces. Some is child-like (Josh Smith, Dan McCarthy); some is quietly elegant (Jean-Baptise Bernadet, Shio Kusaka). Very little pays much attention to such boring concepts as proper material-handling or pristine craftsmanship — vases by Young-Jae Lee come the closest. The only bummer is the inclusion of blown glass works by Flavie Audi and Ristue Mishima. Forgive my prejudices here, but glass always reminds me of grey-bearded ex-hippies in Vermont, and Dale Chihuly. In a show that’s all about anarchic experiments with ceramics, those pieces look hopelessly polished, not nearly as weird and wide-eyed as the rest of the works in a great exhibition — like Marten Medbo’s glazed stoneware, which repurposes Yayoi Kusama’s bulbous-phallic-appendage furniture in a new context.   ALSO WORTH SEEING: Yoshiaki Mochizuki’s small, shiny, precise abstract paintings at Marlborough Chelsea, through October 11; and newcomer Guillaume Bruere’s uneven-but-exciting show of mixed-media figurative drawings at Nahmad Contemporary (next door to Venus Over Manhattan, and also curated by de Pury de Pury), through October 1.   5 Must-See Gallery Shows: Daria Irincheeva, Jim Shaw, and MoreSelect Photo Gallery: 5 Must-See Gallery Shows: Daria Irincheeva, Jim Shaw, and MorePublished: September 25, 2014 Read full article here

Michael Krebber at Nagel Draxler
25/09/2014
Artist: Michael Krebber Venue: Nagel Draxler, Düsseldorf Exhibition Title: KREBBER Date: September 4 – October 4, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: Images courtesy of Nagel Draxler, Düsseldorf Press Release: In “KREBBER” we show a group of works Michael Krebber painted between 1990 and […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

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