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Wegner 100 Years at Bruun Rasmussen
09/12/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Liza MuhlfeldSub-Channels: DesignReferenced Artists: Johannes HansenShort Title : Wegner 100 Years Read full article here

Cooper Hewitt Reopens, Ferguson Museums Preserve Protest Art, and More
09/12/2014
Cooper Hewitt Reopens, Ferguson Museums Preserve Protest Art, and More— Cooper Hewitt Reopens: This Friday, following a massive renovation that took $91 million and three years to complete, the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum will reopen with 60 percent more gallery space and a series of high-tech interactive programs. “My days have been bifurcated between an ambitious renovation of a 19th-century building and a complete rethinking of who we want to be as the only historic and contemporary design museum in the US,” said Cooper Hewitt director Caroline Baumann. Among the innovations set to debut is “the Pen,” a technology designed by Local Projects with Diller Scofidio + Renfro and sponsored by Bloomberg Philanthropies, which visitors can take through the museum, controlling projections on new wall-sized screens and scanning works to create their own virtual collection that they can access later online. [TAN, ARTnews] — Ferguson Museums Preserve Protest Art: Artists in Ferguson, Missouri have been painting uplifting murals on the plywood that covers damage done to local businesses in the wake of the grand jury’s failure to indict Darren Wilson — and now, the Missouri History Museum and Regional Art Commission are trying to preserve some of that art, possibly for a future exhibition. Still, not everyone in Ferguson is thrilled with the idea: “It’s not the history you’d want to remember,” said local business owner Varun Madaksira, whose restaurant burned in the post-verdict protests, while activist Tony Rice asserted, “It’s an attempt to whitewash the pain the community has suffered.” [Columbia Missourian] — Helly Nahmad Leaves Jail Early: Though the art dealer was sentenced to a year in prison for running an illegal gambling operation from his apartment in Trump Tower, he was released to a Bronx halfway house after only five months in jail. [Observer] — National Gallery Names First Female Chair: Documentarian Hannah Rothschild will take over the British institution when Mark Getty ends his term next August. [Guardian] — Detroit Case Raises Lasting Questions: The fraught decision over the Detroit Institute of Art’s collection in light of the city’s bankruptcy introduces some precedent for considering “whether the value of artwork is excepted from cold-calculated monetization of assets for the benefit of creditors and whether the value of an asset can be entwined with issues larger than money, such as pride, history, and culture,” writes Above the Law’s Madeleine Giansanti Cag. Meanwhile, the museum is doing its best to raise the steep $350 million contribution asked of it by the court. [Above the Law, Bloomberg] — Art is Basically Like Chipotle: Marion Maneker draws a parallel between the current path of the high-end art market and the recent popularizing of high-end fast food (e.g., the rise of Chipotle over McDonalds), asserting that art should follow food’s path in “taking once abstruse and artisanal products and making them common fare.” [Quartz] — Eighteen Italian artists — including Enzo Cucchi, Mimmo Paladino, Giuseppe Penone, and Gaetano Pesce — will help design a soup kitchen that will open alongside the Milan Expo in 2015. [TAN] — The MFA Boston has awarded its 2015 Maud Morgan Prize to Marilyn Arsem, marking the first time the $10,000 award has ever been given to a performance artist. [Press release] — In the wake of No-Shave November, London’s Somerset House is hosting a photo exhibition dedicated to beards. [Guardian] ALSO ON ARTINFO Blouin Art + Auction’s Power Game Changers 2014 Playing by the Rules at the Shanghai Biennale The Past Is Present in Göran Olsson’s “Concerning Violence” Man Sentenced to 5 Years in Prison for Punching a Monet Check our blog IN THE AIR for breaking news throughout the day. Published: December 9, 2014 Read full article here

At MoMA, 17 Painters of Our “Forever Now”
09/12/2014
What sets so-called atemporal painting apart from painting that might be less kindly characterized as derivative or regurgitative? In her catalog essay for “The Forever Now,” a 17-artist exhibition which opens at the Museum of Modern Art on December 14, curator Laura Hoptman traces the definition of atemporality to sci-fi novelist William Gibson, for whom the term captures “a new and strange state of the world in which, courtesy of the Internet, all eras seem to exist at once.” While some might lump such a phenomena under the larger banner of postmodernism, Hoptman does not. “Unlike past periods of revivalism, such as the appropriationist eighties, this super-charged art historicism is neither critical nor ironic; it’s not even nostalgic. It is closest to a connoisseurship of boundless information, a picking and choosing of elements of the past to resolve a problem or a task at hand.” But whether we call work like this referential, or appropriationist, or postmodern, or atemporal, it’s hard not to feel slightly deflated by the contours of “Forever Now,” which comes off seeming a bit safe overall. Outside the main exhibition space, a series of large-scale oil-on-paper works by Kerstin Bratsch are hung, with six of them framed and stacked next to the entryway as if they’ve been casually placed in a storage room. A similarly cheeky presentation is apparent in Oscar Murillo’s corner of the show, which includes a series of his signature derivative — I mean, atemporal — canvases along with a number of unstretched, finished paintings thrown on the floor, which gallery visitors are asked to rifle through, touch, Instagram, perhaps roll around in. An explanatory label notes that these unstretched works are “indistinguishable from the ones on the wall in terms of quality,” to which I have little to add. The so-called deskilling of painting has its moment here, too, from Joe Bradley’s grease pencil scrawls of numbers, stick figures, and lines on dirty, creased canvas to Josh Smith’s willfully amateur palm trees, monochromes, and insects. Dianna Molzan represents the revived interest in a Supports/Surfaces-esque drive to peel back the picture plane to reveal what lies beneath. Laura Owens and Michael Williams both experiment with digital imagery and silkscreen or inkjet-on-canvas techniques, combined with the application of actual paint. Julie Mehretu’s 2014 paintings look like Cy Twombly works redone by Christopher Wool. Mary Weatherford’s are fairly unspectacular abstract works jazzed up with thin, colorful neon tubes. Elsewhere we have eccentric portraits from Nicole Eisenman; compositions wobbling on the abstract/figurative divide by Charline von Heyl and Amy Sillman; a trio of vibrant abstracts by Mark Grotjahn; Rashid Johnson’s Ab-Ex energy cut into black soap and wax; Richard Aldridge’s off-handed casualness, which includes wood slats jutting out of the canvas, as well as an abstract that he says is equally inspired by Kanye West and Franz Kline; Matt Connors’s “Variable Foot,” 2014, three primary-colored canvas rectangles that lean against the wall like oversized, very imperfect John McCracken planks. I like almost all of these artists quite a bit, with various exceptions, so I’m still not quite sure why my takeaway from “Forever Now” is one of odd disengagement. Seen together, the paintings in this exhibition evince a kind of tired radicalism, and maybe that’s the point: Here we are, floating in the atemporal ether, where there’s no such thing as a truly radical gesture left. Hoptman’s essay-manifesto makes a determined effort to position atemporal painting as a unique condition: one that subverts the “great-ladder-like narrative of cultural progress that is so dependent upon the idea of the new superseding the old in a movement simultaneously forward and upward.” Atemporal artists are operating in a sea of plenty, high on the “infinite possibilities of reevaluation, remixing, and retrofitting.” It’s a rousing call to arms, but I can’t help but feel that this particular exhibition fails to live up to the level of that rhetoric.  At MoMA, 17 Painters of Our “Forever Now”Select Photo Gallery: Slideshow: "The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World" at MoMAPublished: December 9, 2014 Read full article here

Miami: Clifton Benevento at Art Basel Miami Beach
09/12/2014
Artists: Zak Kitnick Venue: Clifton Benevento, Art Basel Miami Beach Date: December 4 – December 7, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Photos by Contemporary Art Daily Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Miami: Art Basel Miami Beach Selected Works Part 5
09/12/2014
Click here to view slideshow Ugo Rondinone at Eva Presenhuber Hans-Peter Feldmann at 303 Gallery Erika Verzutti at Peter Kilchmann Isa Genzken at Neugerriemschneider Michael E. Smith at Zero Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Timepieces for The Year of the Goat
09/12/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Sub-Channels: Jewelry & WatchesShort Title : Timepieces for The Year of the Goat Read full article here

Dishes by Chef of the Year 2015 Yannick Alléno
09/12/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Sub-Channels: Food & WineShort Title : Dishes by Chef of the Year 2015 Yannick Alléno Read full article here

Miami: Art Basel Miami Beach Selected Works Pt. 4
09/12/2014
Click here to view slideshow Takashi Murakami at Blum & Poe Seth Price at Friedrich Petzel Alex Katz at Thaddaeus Ropac Heimo Zobernig at Chantal Crousel Mary Heilmann at 303 Gallery Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Playing by the Rules at the Shanghai Biennale
09/12/2014
Playing by the Rules at the Shanghai BiennaleTo explain the work of the fictional artist at the Shanghai Biennale, the real artist, Natascha Sadr Haghighian, printed a newspaper, which includes a fake press release and interview. The texts make clear that the invented Robbie Williams — “the artist, not the singer,” Haghighian likes to quip — outsources his generic contemporary art from a Berlin art production company. The stacked television screens, horse jumping sound installation, and readymade hurdle sculptures are all on display in Shanghai. Before the opening, however, Haghighian, who was born in Iran and lives in Berlin, discovered a problem. The English to Chinese translation in the newspapers was gibberish­, garbled by a graphic designer in Beijing. On the cover, “solo show” was mysteriously translated into “the beginning of a new world.” Haghighian discarded the 6,000 misprints and whipped up 100 corrected papers for the opening night. Hosting the 10th Shanghai Biennale, the Power Station of Art is the only state-run museum for contemporary art in in China. As with Haghighian’s newspaper, elements of artistic expression at the Biennale were altered in translation to the government-sanctioned show.  Chief curator Anselm Franke said the 2,000-year history of Chinese bureaucracy, in fact, inspired the concepts behind the Biennale’s theme, “Social Factory.” While curating the Taipei Biennale in 2012, he visited the extensive archives of the imperial dynasties at the Palace Museum, where he was captivated by the nation’s long history of social fabrication.   But as an organizer of this 70-artist show, Franke attempted to evade Chinese codes. “Being an outsider, you can sometimes disregard the rules and hierarchies out of your own ignorance,” said Franke, who is the head of visual art and film at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin. Some protocols, however, were inescapable. As of the Biennale’s opening day, November 23, works from Taiwan were delayed at customs, as any cultural product originating in Taiwan or Hong Kong is automatically sent to Beijing to be inspected by the Ministry of Culture.  And though there is no longer a committee presenting curators with government-approved artists, the Ministry lightly edited this year’s selection of artists and wall texts. Early on, Hong Kong-based artist Pak Sheung Chuen and Guangzhou-based artist Song Ta were blacklisted. There were no formal reasons given for their exclusion.     “The relationship between the government and us [the Power Station of Art] shouldn’t concern average people,” said a high-positioned administrator at the Power Station, who asked not to be named. “Art should be checked in every country,” he added. The Ministry’s sensitivity may have been heightened because of the recent pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong. Singaporean artist Ho Tzu Nyen was originally going to show his film “The Nameless,” which features found footage of Tony Leung Chiu-Wai, a famous Hong Kong actor who voiced his support for the non-violent protests in October. Ho was uncertain if the film would survive the Ministry’s scrutiny — along with Leung’s appearances, the work, inspired by real events, centers around the Secretary General of the Malayan Communist Party, a triple agent responsible for the fall of the Left in Malaya. Regardless, the artist and curator submitted the work, not wanting to police themselves.    “Maybe Anselm [Franke] and I are both just really optimistic people,” Ho said. When the Ministry banned the film from the exhibition, Ho was undaunted. “I think it is important we speak the facts, just as I think it is important we don’t make a big fuss over it, since we all accepted the rules of the game.” Mainland artists themselves have become protean navigators of their political milieu. Zhao Liang, for instance, is best known for his bold documentary “Petition” (2009), which follows migrants for 12 years as they attempt to appeal to a dismissive Communist Party in Beijing. The film was banned in China and the government harassed the artist. And yet, two years later, Zhao collaborated with the Ministry of Health on projects about HIV and AIDS. Today, Zhao is showing the film “Black Face, White Face” (2014) at the Biennale, which presents an intimate look into the worn faces of a coal miner and a limestone factory worker. Before the Biennale opening, the Ministry requested that another Chinese artist, Liu Ding, unplug a telephone line in his installation “1999.” The government officials believed that the story recorded on the phone line about the Chinese art world cast the Biennale in a negative light. “I did not have any anticipation or assumption before hand, but when things like this happen, I am prepared to face it and deal with it,” Liu said. Since the censorship, Liu has been working with the Power Station to correct the Ministry’s misunderstanding — the speaker is talking about biennials in the 1990s, not the current Biennale at the Power Station. Zhao Tao’s painting depicting cannibalism was also removed the day before the opening; presumably, the censors found it macabre. The purging, however, did not rattle the Biennale’s pragmatic curatorial team. “Censorship is part of the established system here,” said Hong Kong-based co-curator Cosmin Costinas. “That doesn’t necessarily make it acceptable, but it is very difficult to be self-righteous about it.” Overall, the works chosen by the international curators for the Biennale are tactical. In the late 1980s through the 2000s, underground, overtly provocative art ran rampant in China. After that, the expanding market became the dominant force, and a distrustful attitude towards art developed among those watching the soaring prices. Franke expressed fear that such cynicism would be tapped to help support neo-traditional, right-leaning politics in the future. “At the moment, I don’t think that cynicism is very productive,” Franke said. “I try to upset mechanisms that produce false alternatives, such as the false alternative between traditional social order and libertarian chaos. But, of course, we can only do minor things in framing discourses.” In recent months, the Communist Party has been tightening its arts policies. In October, Xinhua news reported that China’s president, Xi Jinping, told a group of performers and writers: “Fine art works should be like sunshine from blue sky and breeze in spring that will inspire minds, warm hearts, cultivate taste, and clean up undesirable work styles.” This week, the Party announced that it will instate a program sending artists to the countryside to develop a “correct view on art,” a chilling throwback to the Cultural Revolution.  As for Haghighian’s fictional artist Robbie Williams, his hilariously vanilla art did not attract the Ministry’s attention. At the VIP dinner, a fellow artist expressed his regrets to Haghighian that Robbie Williams himself couldn’t make it to the opening ceremonies. On stage, a few Biennale officials gave opening speeches. The victorious NBA theme song, “Roundball Rock” by John Tesh, boomed during the interludes. Waiters placed the soup course on the rows of white-clothed tables, served in two-tiered bowls with tea candles lighting the lower level. The Power Station committee stood to be applauded, and an ecstatic lightshow erupted across the dim, blue-lit room.  “He would have loved this,” Haghighian replied. The Shanghai Biennale runs through March 31, 2015. Published: December 8, 2014 Read full article here

Miami: Overduin & Co. at NADA
08/12/2014
Artist: Sergei Tcherepnin Venue: Overduin & Co., NADA Date: December 4 – December 7, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Images courtesy of Overduin & Co., Los Angeles Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

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