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Die BMW Art Cars auf einen Blick
22/05/2015
Language German Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): BLOUIN ARTINFOSub-Channels: Autos & BoatsShort Title : Die BMW Art Cars auf einen Blick Read full article here

Hito Steyerl at Artists Space
22/05/2015
Artist: Hito Steyerl Venue: Artists Space, New York Date: March 8 — May 24, 2015 Note: Selected writings to accompany the exhibition can be found here. Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of videos, images, press release and link available after the jump. Videos: Hito Steyerl, Is the Museum a Battlefield?, 2013. Two channel HD video with sound, 40 […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Axel Hütte en Helga de Alvear
22/05/2015
Language Spanish, Spain Featured: 0Order: 0Tags: Marcos FernándezMadridDusseldorf SchoolFotografiaPopular Cities: MadridAuthor(s): Marcos FernándezSub-Channels: GalleriesShort Title : Axel Hütte en Helga de Alvear Read full article here

London
22/05/2015
Language Undefined Location Website: Location Email: admin@delfina.org.ukDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: SouthEast LondonLocation Phone: 020 7357 0244:primary; 020 7357 0250:faxAdmissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

London
22/05/2015
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.flyingcoloursgallery.comDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: ChelseaLocation Phone: +44 (0)20 7960 4200Admissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

London
22/05/2015
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.faslondon.comDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: Bond Street AreaLocation Phone: +44 (0)20 7960 4200Admissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

Preview: Design at Large and Design Curio at Design Miami/ Basel 2015
22/05/2015
Preview: Design at Large and Design Curio at Design Miami/ Basel 2015Two smaller programs, Design at Large and Design Curio, will complement the main exhibition at Design Miami/ Basel this year, with the mission to explore innovation and courage in design. Design at Large presents large-scale works of design, both historical and contemporary, that transcend the traditional gallery booth. Hosted in the 2,000-square meter Event Hall designed by Herzog & de Mauron, this program since 2014 aims to be a platform for ambitious installations that shake up the limits of design, showcasing boundary-breaking practices. Featuring interactive technologies, live performance, micro-architecture, and experimental materials, each one of the exhibits is supported by one of the exhibiting galleries of Design Miami/ Basel. Every year, a different curator presents each edition of Design at Large, chosen for their interdisciplinary knowledge that includes but also transcends design. After American creative director Dennis Freedman, whose inaugural exhibition centered on the concepts of mutation and metamorphosis, André Balazs, a real-estate magnate, restaurateur, and hotel entrepreneur, will curate the 2015 Design at Large. An early collector of architecture, and author of some of the world's most iconic hotels, Balazs's exhibits at Design at Large will center on architectural design. All of the works are selected by Balazs are from a pool of open submissions and explore the concepts of demountability, modularity, and environmental awareness in line with the growing global interest in the evolution of customizable, reusable, and sustainable buildings. Galerie Patrick Seguin will present a prefabricated petrol station designed by French architect Jean Prouvé in 1969 for energy provider Total, a radiating central-plan structure now considered a classical example of prefabrication. Edouard François, in contrast, is a contemporary pioneer of green architecture. His Flower Tower (2015), presented by Galerie Philippe Gravier, is a small, nomadic house project, removable and sustainable: built in gold titanium it can be placed in the landscape as easily as in an exhibition. Nilufar Gallery from Milan is bringing Shigeru Ban's PTH-02 Paper Tea House (2006). The Japanese winner of the Pritzker Prize has experimented with paper structures since 1989, developing various designs for lightweight shelters that can be rapidly assembled in case of emergency, like the Cardboard Cathedral constructed for Christchurch, New Zealand in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake. From Carpenters Workshop Gallery comes Pool House (2015) by Atelier Van Lieshout, a family house evoking both a luxurious hangout and a tribal cave dwelling. Comprised of a bedroom, a children's playground, bar, lounge, and a dressing room, but shaped organically to resemble a rock-hewn troglodyte's cave, Pool House makes a link to the Modernist movement and simultaneously to its complete, primitive opposite. Known for a practice that crosses boundaries between conceptual art, design, and architecture, Pool House showcases Atelier Van Lieshout's interests in vernacular design and mechanization. As for Design Curio, five designer studios will use small booths punctuating the main exhibition hall to focus on ideas and design-related phenomena usually considered too difficult for a gallery program. Curios in Basel will include designer Andy Coolquitt's Guatemala City-inspired Va (2015), a domestic tableau created in collaboration with Guatemalan craftspeople. The Breads of Communism furniture created by Igor Krestovsky in 1937 was intended to reflect the core values of the October Revolution, and is presented by Heritage Gallery, Moscow. Max Lamb's Marmoreal (2014), presented by Dzek, London, is a decorative man-made stone surface covering floors, walls, and furnishings of a single room, creating a camouflage effect. Kersten Geers and Richard Venlet have taken the small space of the Design Curio booth and reduced it to the minimum, presenting two corridor-like spaces. Within them, stacks of architect and artist-designed furniture can be examined from an extreme proximity, undermining the polite distance that normally characterizes the visitor's experience at a design fair. The final Design Curio booth is by Sibylle Stœckli, who continues her Global Design Research series by examining our relationship with food, through the combined lenses of culture, biology, and anthropology. Design Miami/ Basel will run June 16-June 21 in Basel, Switzerland. Published: May 21, 2015 Read full article here

Christoph Büchel: The Mosque. Icelandic Pavilion at Venice Art Biennale 2015
22/05/2015
Swiss artist Christoph Büchel was selected to represent Iceland at the 56th Art Biennale in Venice, Italy. His idea was ... Read full article here

Newark Museum Explores the Elemental and Artificial in Jewelry
22/05/2015
Newark Museum Explores the Elemental and Artificial in JewelryMuseums are increasingly displaying jewelry as a form of wearable art in its own right, sometimes with the conversation centering around the innovative use of materials in alternative ways. “Jewelry is more than just you wear to complement your clothes. If you pick good jewelry, it’s like wearing a piece of art,” says Ulysses Dietz, curator of the exhibition, titled From Pearls to Platinum to Plastic, opening at the Newark Museum in June. By exploring the wide variety and long history of materials used in making jewelry, from the elemental (stone, wood) to the artificial (plastic), and of course the precious (metals and gemstones), the show trains its focus on jewelry as an art object. “Most of the jewelry on display is more interesting than the things people own, which are typically for their value,” says Dietz. Two of the most thought-provoking materials being explored, for instance, are ivory and tortoiseshell, which were common materials in both jewelry and decorative objects from antiquity through to the 19th century, but are illegal to obtain now. “They were kind of the forerunners of plastic, had beautiful colors and were easy to work with. They were also exotic, hailing from Africa and the ocean,” observes Dietz. “Now, plastic is the ultimate artificial material, but also the most colorful and least precious.” The exhibition will feature about 150 objects. The earliest piece is Roman, from the 1st Century A.D., while the most contemporary one is less than two years old. One of Dietz’s favorite pieces is a necklace of more than 300 natural pearls from the turn of the 20th century (pictured below). “Pearls have no style, particularly, but 100 years ago they were worth as much as diamonds, because natural pearls were completely accidental. To find one was a magical thing; to find a lot of them was even more more so,” he explains. “This particular piece was given by a husband to his wife for their wedding anniversary in 1906, which turns this strand of pearls into a story about what jewelry really means in the context of history.” Another highlight is a large brooch of morning glory blossoms, made of gold and plique-a-jour enamel, by Marcus & Co., circa 1900 in New York. Calling it “a sculpture of gold and enamel that is the greatest piece of jewelry ever made by an American jeweler,” Dietz says the brooch was given to the celebrated Irish-American actress Ada Rehan (1859-1916) by the wife of a textile millionaire who happened to also be her fan and friend, and holds great symbolism of love and religion, as well as beauty. Also look out for an unusual bangle by Cartier, circa 1930, that Dietz says “looks like it could be a piece of machinery... an incredibly modernist sculptural object Marlene Dietrich and the Duchess of Windsor owned, making it clearly avant garde enough for these fashion plates.” From Pearls to Platinum to Plastic opens at the Newark Museum on June 27. Published: May 21, 2015 Read full article here

New Britain Museum of Art Explores Contemporary Jewelry with Elizabeth Gage
21/05/2015
New Britain Museum of Art Explores Contemporary Jewelry with Elizabeth GageLondon-based jeweler Elizabeth Gage has always made it her mantra that good jewelry can be worn ‘day into night’. Starting always with the stone before conjuring a design to bring out its full potential, she takes her inspiration from a wide range of influences, including architecture, animals, art, and a strong affinity for the English garden, and is considered as one of today’s most influential jewelry designers. “They say that ‘necessity is the mother of invention.’ This became true for me in the 1980s when I observed that the change in fashion, which put women back into suits, would present me with a fine marketing opportunity for pins. I would have immense creative possibilities to incorporate ancient artifacts, newly-carved stones and luscious pearls,” explains Gage. Since Gage’s first major commission for venerable French jeweler Cartier in New York in 1968, she has gained a following for her work, which combines exquisite stones with ancient bronzes, beautiful carvings, and brightly colored enamel to create highly unique jewels. She has fashioned rings with architectural qualities, such as the Templar ring (named after the Knights Templar, the first bankers in Europe), and historical attributes, like the Sun ring (dedicated to Louis XIV) which is only made with a diamond or a pearl, which represent the sun and moon respectively. “Elizabeth draws liberally upon the designs and even the actual objects of the past and incorporates them in a unique and original fashion so that she references places and people of bygone eras and yet brings them forcefully into the 20th and 21st centuries as jewelry of enormous originality and complexity,” said Douglas Hyland, director of The New Britain Museum of American Art in Connecticut, which is currently staging The Enchanting Jewels of Elizabeth Gage, an exhibition displaying about 250 pieces of Gage’s oeuvre. “In addition to her understanding of the past, Elizabeth is capable of enormous whimsy and possesses a charming sense of humor. After you study each and every one of the objects in this show, you will come away with an appreciation of her inventiveness. Her jewels have an integrity and technological virtuosity which place them far in advance of other contemporary goldsmiths and jewelry designers.” Highlights of the exhibition, which is the museum’s first exploration of contemporary jewelry as an art form, includes items hand-picked by Gage from both The Elizabeth Gage Archive Collection and the private collections of her global clients, that show off how she deftly uses jewels and gold as if they were paint and canvas. “To have been offered this exhibition has made me incredibly happy... and I consider it a great honor,” says Gage. “My beginning as a jeweler started unbeknown to me, in the British Museum. I believe we are all led in different ways to our destination. Sometimes we recognize it early on, sometimes it takes a while, and sometimes we never recognize the jewels that are put before us.” To see the highlights of the exhibition, click on the slideshow. Select Photo Gallery: The Enchanting Jewels of Elizabeth GagePublished: May 21, 2015 Read full article here

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