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Thomas Ruff at S.M.A.K
01/09/2014
Artist: Thomas Ruff Venue: S.M.A.K, Ghent Exhibition Title: Lichten Date: May 17 – August 24, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: Images courtesy of S.M.A.K, Ghent. Images copyright  VG-Bildkunst Bonn 2014. Press Release: S.M.A.K. (Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst) is excited to present an exhibition […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

August Review Index 2014
01/09/2014
Philippe Parreno at Palais de Tokyo Julien Ceccaldi at Paradise Garage Monica Majoli at Air de Paris Harun Farocki at Thaddeus Ropac David Lieske at Vi Vii “Macho Man, Tell It To My Heart” at Artists Space Loretta Fahrenholz at Reena Spaulings and Project Native Informant Than Hussein Clark at Mathew Emil Michael Klein at […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Willi Dorner: Bodies in Urban Spaces / Le Mouvement – Performing the City
01/09/2014
Until November 2014, the 12th edition of the Swiss Sculpture Exhibition is taking place in the city of Biel/Bienne (Switzerland). ... Read full article here

The Tastemaker - Inés de la Fressange’s Paris
01/09/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Tags: ParisInès de la FressangeTastemakerBLOUIN Lifestyle MagazineTravel: Trip IdeasSee + DoShoppingPopular Cities: ParisAuthor(s): Sonia Kolesnikov-JessopSub-Channels: Designer SpotlightShort Title : The Tastemaker - Inés de la Fressange’s Paris Read full article here

Week in Review: August 31, 2014
31/08/2014
Welcome to Week in Review, our Sunday round-up of the last seven days of activity here at Contemporary Art Daily. Please subscribe to our RSS feed, follow us on Twitter, follow us on Tumblr, and become a fan on Facebook. We would like to extend a special thank you to our annual sponsor, NADA. Founded […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

AR: Pierre Huyghe at Centre Pompidou
31/08/2014
Artist: Pierre Huyghe Venue: Centre Pompidou, Paris Date: September 26, 2013 – January 6, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Originally Posted: December 30th, 2013 Note: This entry is part of August Review, our annual look back at this season’s key exhibitions. For more information, see the announcement here. Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Curating Neighborhoods: A Manifesto for the Post-Ethnographic Museum
31/08/2014
Curating Neighborhoods: A Manifesto for the Post-Ethnographic MuseumThis is the second in a series of three talks given at an international conference about contemporary curating held in November 2013 at New York’s School of Visual Arts. The conference was organized
 to celebrate the new masters program in curatorial practice I’ve founded at the school, which commences this month. This talk by Clémentine Deliss, the brilliant director of the Weltkulturen Museum in Frankfurt am Main, continues the subject of curating ethnographic objects that Okwui Enwezor addressed in the inaugural talk in this series, published in the June issue of Modern Painters. While Enwezor thought about the challenges for curators dealing with what he called “spatial and temporal disjunctions” engendered by accelerated mobility, migration, and of course new technologies, Deliss takes up the challenge of rethinking ethnographic collections within a contemporary interdisciplinary context bringing many minds to bear on this material and how it represents — in fact, how museums steeped in historical, sociopolitical, and cultural conventions can renovate their approach to the dissemination of ideas embedded in and circulating around objects, not just ethnographic ones. At a moment in which there is a great amount of philosophical interest within the art world about what is called “object-oriented ontology,” or more simply, “thing theory,” and the revisiting of ideas around animism, Deliss’s thinking about objects could not be more fascinating. — Steven Henry Madoff By way of introduction, I’d like to emphasize that my background is in contemporary art practice rather than art history, and that I studied semantic anthropology in London in the mid 1980s before becoming an independent curator. My models are therefore intimately connected to the conceptual and aesthetic strategies of artists and intellectuals of the late
’70s and early ’80s. Even if studies of anthropology came second to me, they have formed the basis for the intercultural and interdisciplinary work that
I have engaged with over the last 25 years. As a curator, I’ve lived, researched, and produced in numerous cities around the world, publishing books and magazines, setting up think tanks and meetings, and developing strategies for new models of independent inquiry that go beyond the format of the exhibition. Future Academy, the long-term research collective that I directed between 2002 and 2009 on five continents and that looked into structural, architectonic, and epistemological possibilities for a future arts institution finally led me back to the notion of a research collection and, with that, to the foundation of ethnographic museums. For the last three years, I have directed the Weltkulturen Museum in Frankfurt am Main and attempted to introduce a new methodology into ways of interpreting and exhibiting ethnographic materials. At the Weltkulturen Museum we work with more than 67,000 historical objects, an image and film archive of around 100,000 documents, plus a pioneering collection of works of contemporary art from Africa that was initiated by the museum in the early 1980s, prior to the so-called global turn of 1989. However, the underlying condition of this museum remains one of anachronism: The collection is inconsistent in terms of today’s postcolonial condition and does not reflect the current geopolitical circulation of people and goods. As a result, affinity to an ethnographic collection of this kind is not a given. In Frankfurt, we try to tackle the hiatus between then and now through a particular approach based on critical heterogeneity. We introduce external impulses into the museological setting
in order to work with, rather than against, anachronism. As anthropologist Paul Rabinow suggests in an unpublished work in progress, “The exercise is how to present historical elements in a contemporary assemblage such that new visibilities and sayable things become actual, inducing motion and affect.” To think of new ways of curating an ethnographic collection is urgent. It means that instead of obfuscating access to these important works under an ideology of conservation, one attempts to reactivate and remediate them in a meaningful way. This is important because it helps establish new ways of defining collections, breaking down the earlier hierarchies between high and low, between masterpieces and those artifacts relegated to everyday life. In parallel it reintroduces the potential of a research collection into advanced inquiry. Such a research collection is contingent on experiment and dialogue, but it quickly loses its currency. As
such, it remains oddly outside of market forces, yet it characterizes and punctuates the exploration of the moment. To work in this way is intriguing because it means redefining collections as the starting point for a new methodological practice of curating and interpretation. This process is connected to production and therefore to the emergence of a new collection, one that quite literally grows out of care and attention to historical antecedents. The following manifesto aims to identify the key concepts of this approach. The Manifesto It’s about working with a collectionThat belongs to another timeThat belongs to other peopleThat is deeply connected to the histories of European colonialism and tradeThat is contested and will continue to be contestedWhose referentiality is far from expendedWhose restitution is undeniable It’s about working with what you haveWith the existing architecture and not against itDoing domestic research in 19th-century villasMoving between apartments, studios, archives, and lab roomsFinding structural solutions for the installation of artifacts that are neither in storage nor exhibitedRepositioning collections both conceptually and physicallyMaking new assemblages It’s about reintroducing a laboratory into the museumA lab of renewed interpretationOf self-critical and recursive inquiriesSlow, prone to change, and not always visibleDeveloping a center for thought as yet undervalued by market concerns It’s about the possibility of production inside a museumA place of embodied institutional critiqueA workshop for the production of prototypesUnfinished, incomplete, tentative, and generousBuilding a new collection out of the collectionA research collection for today’s emergent investigationsConstructing exhibitions out of this recursive procedure It’s about remediation over timeAbout working with a deficient situationDaring to change the anthropological classification of objectsSuspending the logos of ethnosDeveloping different metaphors and interpretations through dialogical and visual inquiryExhibiting unfinished models, test works, exercisesRethinking the exhibition as an instrument of remediationEngaging the public in the process It’s about curating neighborhoodsInviting artists, designers, lawyers, writers, historians, and anthropologists in residenceThose who connect to the original source of the collectionThose who come from elsewhereAdjacent and responsiveRubbing shoulders through their engagement with the museumForging new alliances and contemporary geographiesBuki Akib, John Akomfrah, A Kind of Guise, Bruce Altshuler, Marie Angeletti, Lothar Baumgarten, Helke Bayrle, Thomas Bayrle, Benedikte Bjerre, Rut Blees Luxemburg, Friedrich von Bose, Peggy Buth, CassettePlaya, Marc Camille Chaimowicz, Sunah Choi, Hamish Clayton, Clegg & Guttmann, Minerva Cuevas, Mathis Esterhazy, Patricia Falguières, Michael Fehr, Heather Galbraith, Bryce Galloway, Gabriel Gbadamosi, Matthias Görlich, Ros Gray, Hans-Jürgen Heinrichs, Werner Herzog, Michael Kraus, Pramod Kumar KG, David Lau, Armin Linke, Antje Majewski, Tina Makereti, Tom McCarthy, Markus Miessen, Renée Mussai, Otobong Nkanga, Michael Oppitz, Peter Osborne, Perks and Mini, Francis Pesamino, Simon Popper, Paul Rabinow, Ciraj Rassool, Olivier Richon, Markus Schindlbeck, Richard Sennett, El Hadji Sy, Luke Willis Thompson, David Weber-Krebs (Weltkulturen Museum, 2011–13) It’s the seed of a new museum-universityUnequivocally collection-centered, working outward from actual exhibitsDeconstructing earlier archives and the histories of ethnographic museumsWorking with virtual labs to enable greater accessProviding a new platform for professional development Associating artists as curators and custodiansInterconnecting the younger generation of protagonistsThose from curatorial studies, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, museum studies, contemporaryart, design, performance, art history, anthropology, music, literature, law, architecture, ecology,informatics…At global locations of education, in South Africa, Nigeria, Senegal, Brazil, New Zealand…Constantly working with external impulsesRedrafting the concept of Generalism and the democratic intellectToward a nonstandardized educationIndependent and self-organizingA subjective, porous, critical institution   Published: August 31, 2014 Read full article here

“Interior” at Modern Art
30/08/2014
Artists: Juliette Blightman, Tom Burr, John Divola, Phillip Lai, Robert Overby, Reto Pulfer, John Smith, Jane and Louise Wilson Venue: Modern Art, London Exhibition Title: Interior Date: July 18 – August 23, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of video, images, and link available after the jump. Videos: Jane and Louise Wilson, excerpt from Routes 1 & 9 North, […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Group Show at Gladstone Gallery
29/08/2014
Artists: John Knight, Manfred Pernice, Tom Burr, Klara Liden, Kitty Kraus, Gedi Sibony, Reena Spaulings, Sergej Jensen Venue: Gladstone Gallery, New York Exhibition Title: Galerie Neu at Gladstone Gallery Date: June 27 – August 1, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: Images courtesy of Gladstone Gallery, […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

AR: Pamela Rosenkranz at Karma International
29/08/2014
Artist: Pamela Rosenkranz Venue: Karma International, Zurich Exhibition Title: My Sexuality Date: June 14 – July 26, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Originally Posted: August 11th, 2014 Note: This entry is part of August Review, our annual look back at this season’s key exhibitions. For more information, see the announcement here. Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

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