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La Nave: Lio Malcas neue Kunstlocation in Ibiza
18/08/2015
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Montreal
18/08/2015
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.gibsonejessop.comDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: SohoLocation Phone: (514) 982.1812Admissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

Prague
18/08/2015
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.jirisvestka.com/Location Email: gallery@jirisvestka.comDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: FulhamLocation Phone: 420 222 311 092:primary; 420 222 311 099:faxAdmissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

The Art of “Living” Populates France’s Domaine de Chamarande
18/08/2015
The Art of “Living” Populates France’s Domaine de ChamarandeWith an abundance of historic buildings and spectacular natural landscapes, it is no wonder that France has a long history of staging major art exhibitions within the cavernous halls and throughout the grounds of its grandest estates. One of the many historic estates hosting major art exhibitions this summer is Le Domaine de Chamarande in the department of Essonne in the Île-de-France region. Le Domaine de Chamarande is the site of the spectacular 17th century Chamarande chateau, set within the largest public garden in the Essonne (98 hectares). The grounds also host a contemporary art centre, the archives of the department, the Auguste Mione housing scheme for school pupils, as well as the storage space for the department’s contemporary art collection. The theme of this year’s major exhibition is “Habiter” (Live) and features works by Florent Albinet, Pierre Ardouvin, art nOmad, Berdaguer & Péjus, Botto e Bruno, Charlotte Charbonnel, COLOCO, constructlab, Florence Doléac et David de Tscharner, Jean-François Fourtou, Zhenchen Liu, Liliana Motta, Giulia Piccione, Stefan Shankland, Stéphane Thidet, Laurent Tixador, Laure Tixier. According to Le Domaine de Chamarande, the exhibition explores the notion of “living,” in particular the connection between man and the places of his existence, but also to the relationships people establish with the environment and their families. Interweaving time and space, the exhibition heightens viewers’ awareness of their surroundings and challenges them to question the meaning of “living.” Visitors can spend a night in pop-up cabins by Florence Doléac and David de Tscharner, relax on the water in Florent Albinet’s gondola, experience Pierre Ardouvin’s fun yet scary “Maison vide” labyrinth, sneak Jean-François Fourtou’s installation of rustic wooden furniture, stroll through Liliana Motta’s “edge inhabited,” or experience Charlotte Charbonnel’s recreation of an old smokehouse. “Habiter” is at Domaine de Chamarande until November 1, 2015 Click the slideshow to see images of the exhibition Select Photo Gallery: Habiter 2015 at Le Domaine de ChamarandePublished: August 18, 2015 Read full article here

Art in the City 2015
18/08/2015
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Sotheby’s to Offer John Russell Impressionist Masterpiece
18/08/2015
Sotheby’s to Offer John Russell Impressionist Masterpiece Sotheby’s Australia will offer an early masterpiece by the influential Australian-born Impressionist painter John Peter Russell (1858-1931) during its August 25 Important Australian Art sale at the InterContinental Sydney. The stunning work, titled “Ariadne,” depicts the daughter of King Minos of Crete laying recumbent on the seashore, swathed with fine drapery and propped up against two giant shells. Geoffrey Smith, Chairman of Sotheby’s Australia commented: “Confidante of Vincent van Gogh and friend of Claude Monet, John Russell became Australia’s most internationally accomplished contemporary artist. Ariadne 1883 is the artist’s most ambitious and celebrated formative subject, bearing the hallmarks of the Neo-classical ideal of the late nineteenth century and the influence of Frederic Leighton, one of its most renowned exponents. With Ariadne, Russell’s audacious subject and strident palette proved contentious to less progressive Australian audiences when initially shown.” John Peter Russell was the only Australian painter to benefit from a close and personal relationship with the French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist painters during his expatriate years in Europe in the 1880’s, becoming friends with Vincent Van Gogh, an associate of Claude Monet and August Rodin, as well as a mentor to Henri Matisse. Ariadne was first exhibited at the Art Society of New South Wales in March 1883 and was originally owned by the engineer, politician, pastoralist, and artist, Edward Combes, who according to Sotheby’s Australia was a family friend and early mentor of John Russell. “Ariadne” is Russell’s largest composition and has remained in a private Melbourne collection since 1973. Published: August 17, 2015 Read full article here

5 Films to See This Week in New York: “The Mend,” “Who Killed Vincent Chin?” and More
17/08/2015
5 Films to See This Week in New York: “The Mend,” “Who Killed Vincent Chin?” and More“The Mend,” IFC Center, opens August 21 John Magary’s mightily impressive debut film is a tale of sibling love and hate, featuring a messy-haired performance by Josh Lucas as Mat, who in the opening minutes is kicked out of his girlfriend’s apartment and begins rip-roaring through the city streets — stumbling around, throwing a drink at a woman in a bar. He is tense and dangerous because of his unpredictability. His motives, even purpose, are unclear. Eventually Mat ends up at a party hosted by his brother Alan (Stephen Plunkett) and his girlfriend Farrah (Mickey Sumner). The two are planning a camping trip for the next day, where, we later find out, Alan plans to propose marriage. Both are none too happy to find Mat crashing their get-together, watching him antagonize people while slumped on the couch. But they can’t kick him out. He is family, a part of themselves, albeit the part you try to hide. Things escalate from there. Mat ends up staying at his brother’s apartment while they are away, and immediately invites his girlfriend and her young son over, spreading out over the small space. When Alan returns from his vacation early, and alone, bonds are formed and broken among the group, while the personalities of the brothers begin to merge. Propelled by a scatter-brained energy, “The Mend” blends kinetic naturalism with storybook innocence, including iris shots out of a silent movie and a scene where the brothers, on a drunken rampage, literally walk through a movie set thick with fake fog as if entering a dream. It’s this quality that makes the film more interesting than your standard young-white-guys-with-problems narrative that dominates so much of independent cinema. “Who Killed Vincent Chin?” Brooklyn Academy of Music, August 19 Christine Choy and Renee Tajima-Peña’s 1987 documentary, which was nominated for an Academy Award, details the tragic story of Vincent Chin, a Chinese-American man who was killed in the Highland Park neighborhood outside Detroit. While exiting a strip club with friends a week before his wedding, Chin was chased down by Ronald Ebens and his stepson, Michael Nitz, two autoworkers who were employed by Chrysler. Apparently an incident had occurred inside the establishment, although what exactly happened changes depending on who is telling the story. What we do know is that Ebens and Nitz followed Chin out of the club, caught up with him at a local McDonalds, and beat him so viscously with a baseball bat that he suffered brain-damage and died four days later. Reportedly, Ebens and Nitz were yelling racial slurs at Chin, telling him he was to blame for the slew of layoffs that had occurred in the auto-industry due to increased Japanese competition. (Chin, as mentioned above, was Chinese-American.) The film follows the various trials and the roles played by investigative journalists and activists in shedding light on hate crimes against Asian Americans, and features heartbreaking interviews with Chin’s mother. “X: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes,” Anthology Film Archives, August 21 Roger Corman’s 1963 low-budget magnum opus screens at Anthology Film Archives as part of the essential American International Pictures series, dedicated to the b-movie production house that released an astonishing array of films from the 1950s to the 1970s. Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola, Dennis Hopper, and Jack Nicholson are some of the bold-faced names that worked with the company, but the name that rings truest to the spirit of AIP is Corman, who worked on more than 40 films for the company either as producer or director. Corman will be present at the screening of “X: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes” on August 21 for a conversation following the film, and will appear on August 22 for screenings of “Bucket of Blood” (1959) And “Tomb of Ligeia” (1964), both of which he directed. “Fort Tilden,” IFC Center, ongoing The feature-length debut of writer-directors Sarah-Violet Bliss and Charles Rogers that follows two 20-somthings on a journey from Williamsburg to the titular beach, is part, as ARTINFO’s Scott Indrisek explains, of a growing cannon which includes Lena Dunham’s “Girls,” the web-series “High Maintenance,” and Comedy Central’s “Broad City.” “As a 34-year-old Brooklynite who feels a bit uncomfortably close to the target demographic of “Fort Tilden,” it’s hard to know how to process the film,” Indrisek writes. “At the very least, it’s a highly entertaining contribution to the body of gently self-hating entertainment centered on the world’s most self-loving city — but where do you go from there?” “Mistress America,” Landmark Sunshine Cinema, ongoing Noah Baumbach has gone back to making fully formed comedies about young people, which we couldn’t be more happy about. His middle-aged “what’s up with the kids these days?” routine, most notably in the Ben Stiller-starring duo “Greenberg” and “While We’re Young,” has been exhausting. This one features current muse Greta Gerwig, who co-wrote the script and stars as an over-eager and hyper-active city dweller who develops a relationship with her soon-to-be stepsister, a lonely freshman at Barnard, pulling her along as they dream and scheme.  Published: August 17, 2015 Read full article here

Sotheby’s “Made in Britain” Sale Celebrates British Art
17/08/2015
Sotheby’s “Made in Britain” Sale Celebrates British ArtThe Sotheby’s London September 30 “Made in Britain” sale celebrates the diversity and innovative spirit of British art from 1900 to the present day. Spanning fine art, design, photography, printmaking, and studio ceramics, the sale features 400 works with estimates ranging from £200-£60,000, and according to Sotheby’s illustrates the role that Britain played in the development of modernism. Fine art highlights include L.S. Lowry’s 1966 painting “Man Sitting in a Wheelbarrow” (est. £40,000-60,000), Tracey Emin’s 1988 painting “Untitled (Porchester Baths)” (est. £5,000-7,000), British Pop Art pioneer Richard Hamilton’s painting “The Critic Laughs” (est. £35,000-45,000), as well as a sketch by first generation British Pop Art star Allen Jones (est. £3,000-5,000). Rankin and Chris Levine’s 2001 photo of Kate Moss, “Breeding Kate 1,” leads the selection of iconic photographs (est. £15,000-20,000) which also includes the Angus McBean photograph that launched the career of Audrey Hepburn (est. £2,000-3,000) and well as Lorenzo Agius’s legendary 1997 Vanity Fair cover shot of Liam Gallagher and Patsy Kensit (est. £4,000-6,000). An early Grayson Perry self-portrait plate from 1986 (est. £15,000-20,000) leads the impressive collection of British studio ceramics which also features works by the likes of Dame Lucie Rie and Hans Coper. The exciting group of British prints fearures Lucian Freud Painter’s “Garden” (est. £30,000-50,000) as well as an extremely rare Ben Nicholson linoleum cut (est. £6,000-8,000). Also included in the “Made in Britain” sale are a number of works from the collection of the late Greek-British artist Michael Michaeledes who is best known for his minimalist stretched-canvas reliefs. Highlights from the collection include a rare and fascinating early proof of the David Hockney print “The Diploma” (est. £12,000-18,000) and an exciting group of works by the late Robyn Denny. Published: August 17, 2015 Read full article here

Patrizio di Massimo alla Monteverdi Tuscany
17/08/2015
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L'hôtel Langham Place consacre sa galerie à Alex Katz
17/08/2015
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