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The Art of Killer Heels at Brooklyn Museum
03/04/2014
If heels could kill… you’ll find them in the Brooklyn Museum’s new exhibition, “Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe,” opening September 10 and running through February 15, 2015. As it turns out, gravity-defying footwear isn’t a 20th century invention: more than 160 artfully-crafted high heels from the 17th century through the present will be on display here, exploring the provocative and transformative quality of the vertiginous shoe — not to mention its connotations of power, fantasy and identity. Historical highlights will include a mid-17th century Italian chopines made of silk, leather, and wood; 19th-century cotton and silk embroidered Manchu platform shoes from China; and Ferragamo’s famous multi-colored platform shoe. Slightly more fantastical specimens will be the stiletto mules of silk, metal, and glass by Roger Vivier for House of Dior (1960) and a wool "heel hat" made by Elsa Schiaparelli in collaboration with Salvador Dalí (1937-38).  Meanwhile, heels designed by architects will include Zaha Hadid's chromed vinyl rubber, kid nappa leather, and fiberglass “Nova” shoe (2013), made in collaboration with United Nude; the “Eamz” pump with an inverted chair leg for a heel by Rem D. Koolhaas (not to be confused with his uncle Rem Koolhaas of OMA); and a black leather platform bootie with an 8-inch heel designed by Rem D. Koolhaas for Lady Gaga (2012). All told, the shoes will range from conceptual and not-mass-produced, to plausibly wearable, and explore all sculptural, architectural, and artistic possibilities of footwear. Notwithstanding exhibits that the museum deems to defy categorization, the exhibition will be organized in six thematic sections: Revival and Reinterpretation; Rising in the East; Glamour and Fetish; Architecture; Metamorphosis; and Space Walk. The exhibition will also feature six specially-commissioned short films by artists Nick Knight, Marilyn Minter, Steven Klein, Ghada Amer and Reza Farkhondeh, Zach Gold, and Rashaad Newsome — that are all inspired by high-heels. “Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe” will include other designers like Manolo Blahnik, Chanel, Tom Ford, Pierre Hardy, Iris van Herpen, Nicholas Kirkwood, Christian Louboutin, Alexander McQueen, Prada, and Vivienne Westwood, as well as works from the Bata Shoe Museum. After its stint at the Brooklyn Museum, it will travel to other venues to be announced. Click here to see highlights of the exhibition. The Art of Killer Heels at Brooklyn MuseumSelect Photo Gallery: Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled ShoePublished: April 2, 2014 Read full article here

Eternal Flame: Jim Jarmusch's "Only Lovers Left Alive"
02/04/2014
Eternal Flame: Jim Jarmusch's "Only Lovers Left Alive"“Trust a minimalist to make absences as important as presences,” the critic Jonathan Rosenbaum once wrote about film director Jim Jarmusch. Presented on screen, it’s a practice that could easily be misunderstood as vague or pretentious, and often is. It’s why Jarmusch, over a long career that’s produced 11 films in just over three decades — which are being screened at the Film Society of Lincoln Center in a retrospective pegged to the release of his latest film, the superb “Only Lovers Left Alive” — is routinely labeled as self-consciously cool, a filmmaker who makes work where nothing happens, all style and no substance. But what makes Jarmusch an interesting and oddly consistent filmmaker, contra popular belief, is that there’s often a lot happening between what’s there and not there, the absences and presences Rosenbaum describes. “Only Lovers Left Alive,” which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2013 and traversed the festival circuit through the end of the year, contains the biggest absence in any of Jarmusch’s films — centuries lived by the two main characters, vampires Adam (Tom Hiddelston) and Eve (Tilda Swinton). When we meet the couple they are living in Detroit and Tangiers respectively, cities on opposite ends of the globe not coincidently marked by a certain chiseled away or burned out absence. Erudite outsiders with years of knowledge and experience behind them, they are forced to hustle to acquire the blood they need to survive — you can’t just go biting people’s necks anymore, can you? — while living out their final days in darkness as the world closes in on them. What Jarmusch crafts out of these materials is maybe the longest love story in history. But Adam and Eve’s idyllic fading into the good night is disrupted by the appearance of Eve’s sister Ava (Mia Wasikowska), whose reckless behavior threatens to suddenly and tragically end what they’ve been holding onto for years. Like many of Jarmusch’s films, “Lovers” is as much about the characters as it is about time itself. The lack of a sustained plot, another absence, is intentional, which results in wonderful scenes of the two simply being present. You get the feeling Jarmusch is more than happy making an entire film in one room with Adam as he plays obscure blues records and strums feedback-laden chords on his guitar. And it’s time that has strengthened the bond between Adam and Eve. As the two come to terms with the end of their experience, you feel the weight of that time pressing down on the film — what makes this work uniquely powerful is the way that, beneath the surface, there exist depths of emotion that are felt but not explained. They don’t need to be. In the film’s final moments, it’s hard not to think Jarmusch had the words of a former collaborator, Neil Young, rolling around his head (or blasting out of his speakers): “It’s better to burn out than to fade away.” Published: April 2, 2014 Read full article here

Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe
02/04/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Michelle Tay Read full article here

Slideshow: Robert Heinecken at MoMA
02/04/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Benjamin Park Read full article here

Net-a-Porter and V&A Launch Capsule Collection
02/04/2014
Three days ahead of the opening of “The Glamour of Italian Fashion 1945-2014” at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, online luxury fashion retailer Net-a-Porter.com has released an exclusive fashion and jewelry collection to celebrate the exhibition. The 22-piece limited-edition collection comprises rings, necklaces, cuffs, bracelets and earrings created by Marni, Dolce & Gabbana, Missoni, Etro and Moschino.   Each brand was inspired by its archives, as “The Glamour of Italian Fashion 1945-2014” explores Italy’s contributions to modern fashion by digging into the country’s expertise in craftsmanship, materials and manufacturing. On display will be around 100 specimens of menswear and womenswear by the leading Italian fashion houses including Giorgio Armani, Gucci, Prada and Valentino, alongside yesterday's post-war designers (such as the Fontana Sisters and Simonetta) and today's emerging Italian fashion talent. Noting it is Net-a-Porter's first effort collaborating with the V&A, Sasha Sarokin, the website’s buying manager, said in a statement: “We are so excited to be partnering with them on such an incredible collection. Each designer has created a relevant piece for the fashion jewelry capsule which perfectly represents the craftsmanship and heritage of the brand.” The V&A Italian Fashion Jewelry Collection is now available on Net-a-Porter.com and at the V&A Shop, both in store and online at www.vandashop.com. Prices range from $250 (for Missoni's multi-colored woven bracelets) to $885 (for a gold-plated, Swarovski crystal and resin necklace by Etro), and 10% of all sales will be donated to the V&A. “The Glamour of Italian Fashion 1945-2014” runs at the V&A from April 5 to July 27. Click here to see a slideshow of some highlights from the collection. Net-a-Porter and V&A Launch Capsule CollectionSelect Photo Gallery: Highlights from V&A and Net-a-Porter's Made in Italy Collection Published: April 2, 2014 Read full article here

Highlights from V&A and Net-a-Porter's Made in Italy Collection
02/04/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Benjamin Park Read full article here

Consequences of a Sculpture: Karla Black at David Zwirner Gallery
02/04/2014
Consequences of a Sculpture: Karla Black at David Zwirner GalleryHow Not to Know, 2014, a collapsed sculptural window of paint-smeared cellophane, introduces Scottish artist Karla Black’s first solo exhibition at David Zwirner (through April 12). On the other side, pale luminous stripes of pink and white chalk powder abut a mottled blue plane in a formation that recalls a vast and fragile flag. Black’s pastel palette is unsaturated but not unassuming, evoking traditionally gendered color schemes, but the work’s delicate formal qualities are not shorthand for femininity. The powder remains on the brink of drifting away even as it sinks into the cracks and dimples of the concrete gallery floor. Although the exhibition fills most of the space, the wrong gesture or exhalation could easily destroy its order. It generates a haptic temptation, requiring effort to look but not touch. Vertical strips of Scotch tape run floor to ceiling, marked by the artist’s fingerprints. The tape gently sways, reflecting lines of light. One corner of the piece is broken up by dribbled marks and crumbling fragments of bath bombs. These casual gestures are an intrusion into a system, subtle yet unanticipated interjections to measured arrangements. This juncture is one of several places where traces of the hand and readymade products combine in the artist’s sculptural vocabulary. Black fluidly combines drug-store products with traditional art supplies, and conceives the overlapping pieces that make up this exhibition as individual sculptures rather than a single installation. Bisecting the room, small flat works hang on intersecting tape and threads, each seemingly on the verge between two states. One is composed of petal-like nail polish remover pads stained in the faintest blue, recalling Helen Frankenthaler’s color fields. Other hanging forms include a suspended cellophane work and paintings on torn paper, which are bracketed by For However Long, 2014, another collection of circular nail polish remover pads. A configuration of four lifesize chalk-covered paper objects rest near the back wall. Black refutes interrogations of meaning, choosing instead to question the object’s position in real time and space. In a 2011 video interview she asked, “What are the consequences of this sculpture?” Her combination of unfixed yet carefully arranged components creates a tension between formlessness and form. At first glance, her insistence on the autonomy of these objects as single works could seem perplexing, but there is a more layered operation in her work: the gesture of gathering, of forming a temporary convergence of materials, followed by their eventual dispersion out into the world. A version of this article will appear in the June/July 2014 issue of Modern Painters magazine.  Published: April 2, 2014 Read full article here

Kraftwerk's Nostalgia Tour: Not Human After All
02/04/2014
Kraftwerk's Nostalgia Tour: Not Human After AllIt seemed a fitting tribute to Frankie Knuckles, the legendary spinner of dance music who passed away on March 31 from complications related to diabetes, that I was uptown last night at the United Palace Theater, a former movie palace repurposed as a high-functioning music venue, to feel the robotic pulse that influenced Knuckles and countless other deejays across the globe: Kraftwerk. There are very few groups that can truthfully claim the kind of influence Kraftwerk has had on modern pop music. There were others, certainly — Giorgio Morodor, for starters, not to mention hundreds of deejays from New York, Chicago, and Detroit — but the mechanical rhythms and arpeggiod synth lines that glide along like sleek trains became an integral part of hip-hop, house, techno, and its many offshoots, while their robotic personas were enough of a blank slate — devoid of standard celebrity personality — that it was easy for various subcultures to take their work as the raw materials to build upon. Techno artist Carl Craig once claimed, in an attempt to explain their appeal within African-American dance subcultures, that Kraftwerk “were so stiff, they were funky.” I’ve always liked that turn of phrase, and even more so today because the group, or what’s left of them — Ralf Hütter is the sole remaining original member — is decidedly not funky. Their recent performances, including highly touted stints at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Tate Modern in London, have been part of an attempt to stake their place within an art historical context. That’s wonderful, and needs to happen more. The problem of course is that “music” and “art,” especially when defined by institutions, have tunnel vision, and have yet to realize that the two worlds are not mutually exclusive. This is how I ended up at a Kraftwerk show where nobody danced. Looking around the theater at one point, observing the stillness of the audience’s enraptured gaze under the three-dimensional projections behind the band, letting out a little cheer every time an object on the screen appeared to be whooshing over our heads, gave the entire thing the feeling of being in a planetarium. This is a nostalgia tour after all, so I shouldn’t have had such high expectations. Kraftwerk ran through the hits — “Autobahn,” “Trans-Europe Express,” “Computer World” — and ended their two-hour set with some recent numbers that left the crowd a little restless. While the projections were often literal — lyrics from the songs, an image from a train during a song about a train — and bordered on the absurd, I’ll admit that listening to “Radio-Activity” in a room that size, absorbed by the sound and lights and projected images, was genuinely moving. It was also the song I was looking forward to the most, so it’s possible I was just trying really hard to have an emotional experience, even if it was like squeezing water out of a rock. But maybe this is the logical place for a group like Kraftwerk to end up. “The Robots,” the song they opened with, is a declaration of their aims, and their concept of the “man-machine,” stripped of human emotion, emphasizes the idea that these bandmates are interchangeable objects. That’s partly why nobody seems to care much that other, faceless-nameless old men have replaced three of the four original members. But it’s also why the music that was once so stiff that it was funky is now just stiff. Published: April 2, 2014 Read full article here

“Constellations of One and May” at ar/ge kunst
02/04/2014
Artist: Falke Pisano, Archive Books Venue: ar/ge kunst, Bolzano  Exhibition Title: Constellations of One and May Curated by: Emanuele Guidi Date: January 24 – March 22, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: Images courtesy of ar/ge kunst, Bolzano. Photos by Ivo Corrá. Press Release: After its […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Cindy Sherman, Lucien Smith, Michael Stipe Celebrate the New Museum
02/04/2014
Last night, the New Museum celebrated its annual spring gala at Cipriani’s Wall Street, honoring Lynda Benglis and Annabelle Selldorf. The former is a sculptor known for contorting latex into uncanny, alien shapes; the latter is one of the art world’s favorite architects, responsible for a number of recent projects in New York, including gallery spaces for Hauser & Wirth and David Zwirner. A star-studded crowd mostly abided by the stated dress code of “red and racy.” Perhaps in order to match tones with the evening’s sponsor, Ferrari, Simon de Pury added a dash of color by draping a scarlet sweater across his shoulders — for better or worse, no one’s attire pushed the definition of “racy” close to, say, Benglis’s infamous, very NSFW Artforum ad. The event was co-hosted by actress Greta Gerwig and W magazine editor Stefano Tonchi. De Pury auctioned off personal portrait commissions courtesy of Alex Katz and Takashi Murakami; in total, the event raised $2.5 million. Dinner guests — including Cindy Sherman, Rashid Johnson, Michael Stipe, Lucien Smith, Malcolm Morley, and Rita Ackermann — were entertained by Swedish musician Lykke Li, who is gearing up for the early May release of her latest album, “I Never Learn.”  Click on the slideshow to see images of guests at the New Museum’s spring gala. Cindy Sherman, Lucien Smith, Michael Stipe Celebrate the New MuseumSelect Photo Gallery: Slideshow: Cindy Sherman, Lucien Smith, Michael Stipe Celebrate the New Museum - April 1, 2014Published: April 2, 2014 Read full article here

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