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Lea Lublin in München
25/06/2015
Language German Featured: 0Order: 0Tags: Lea LublinLenbachhausPopular Cities: MunichAuthor(s): BLOUIN ARTINFOSub-Channels: MuseumsReferenced Artists: Lea LublinShort Title : Lea Lublin in München Read full article here

Torino
25/06/2015
Language Undefined Location Website: Location Email: gallery@tuccirusso.comDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: Bond Street AreaLocation Phone: 39 0121 953 357:primary; Admissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: Wednesday - Sunday 10.30 am - 1.00 pm and 3.00 pm - 7.00 pmlocation fax: 39 0121 953 459:faxGuide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

Michaël Borremans at Dallas Museum of Art
25/06/2015
Artist: Michaël Borremans Venue: Dallas Museum of Art Exhibition Title: As sweet as it gets Date: March 15 – July 5, 2015 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: Images courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art Press Release: The Dallas Museum of Art presents the U.S. premiere of the […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Sobre el papel en SC Gallery de Bilbao
25/06/2015
Language Spanish, Spain Featured: 0Order: 0Tags: Marcos FernándezBilbaoPopular Cities: OtherAuthor(s): Marcos FernándezSub-Channels: GalleriesShort Title : Sobre el papel en SC Gallery Read full article here

Q&A: Anthony Haden-Guest on “The Last Party” and New York Club Culture
25/06/2015
Q&A: Anthony Haden-Guest on “The Last Party” and New York Club CultureWriter, cartoonist, and now curator Anthony Haden-Guest has organized a new show at White Box gallery that looks at New York City club culture, spanning the mid-1970s to the early ’90s. It is a milieu that Haden-Guest knows intimately — both from living it and writing about it in his 1997 book, “The Last Party: Studio 54, Disco and the Culture of the Night” (through August 23). In addition to ephemera (like an invitation to a Doomsday party), he has brought together grainy photos of rockers, experimental videos, graffiti, and edgy, unfussy paintings for the exhibition. Artists like Lorna Simpson and Karen Finley and photographers Andres Serrano and Mick Rock are among more than 50 artists featured in the show. Haden-Guest noted that he will be adding more artists to the roster and rehanging the show over the course of its summer run, explaining that it’s about “discovering more material as it moves along.” “I want it to be not the traditional art show at all,” he said. “I want it to be people like experiencing what it was like living then.” ARTINFO spoke to the party expert about Studio 54, nostalgia for a lost bohemian life, and what New York’s art world is missing today.  So, to begin, what is club art, how is it different from what’s being made today?   I have never in my life lived through a period like today in which there is so much derivative art, and in good galleries — I am not talking about dumb galleries. That’s why I have a particular interest in the art and photography that came out of that whole life of clubs. Because mostly the artists and photographers there were just people. With a few exceptions, they were mostly making what they were doing with absolutely no eye on what was going on in the gallery world. It was an interesting culture of its own. What they were doing was not part of the gallery economy — they were very much in opposition. Do you think there is nostalgia for that outsider spirit today? One thing I’ve noticed is that the past used to come back pretty slowly. People started getting nostalgic about the 1920s about 30 years later, in the 1960s. People got nostalgic about the 1960s in the 1980s. And now people are already nostalgic about for the period of Studio 54. And there is a particular nostalgia here in New York as it goes through a devastating change of the growing wealth gap. The kind of edgy bohemian life is becoming harder and harder to live here. So that time seems like a very tainted golden age. How did this club life feed the art? Andy Warhol described the success of Studio 54 as: “Dictatorship at the door, democracy on the floor.” And there was that extraordinary populism. When I came, it was a time of New Journalism, and one of the things about New Journalism was this intense curiosity about other people. The mix at the door was deliberate — Steve Rubell described it as a “salad.” He tried to get Eurotrash, rich people, guys from the docks, and nerds, whatever — he wanted an interesting mix. But, well, those times have passed. It is not a huge popular movement anymore. Back then, everybody wanted to get involved. When people were not trained artists and were performers and rockers, making art was huge cultural meld. And it all began with Studio 54? It is all equated with Studio 54, but that is a bit unfair. Because there were other places back then like the Mud Club, and so forth. But in a way, it is accurate, because during that whole Vietnam period the majority did not go to clubs. They went to sit-ins, they went to run-ins, they went to marches. Clubs were what their moms and dads went to. Certainly everybody wanted to party. But you had the women’s movements, you had the gay movement, you had every type of liberation movement explored at the same time in glorious abandon.  There is a particular emphasis on photography in the show from work by Bob Gruen to Roberta Bayley. Why? This whole thing began as a New York phenomenon and it went totally worldwide. Newspapers, particularly in England and France, would not be putting paintings on the front page; they were putting photographs of naked people painted silver — that’s what spread the phenomenon. How did the clubs transform New York? The New York to which I came in the mid-70s was still a city of neighborhoods. People in Brooklyn, for instance, had funny accents, accents you don’t hear anymore. But, ironically, Studio 54, disco, Eurotrash turned New York into an international city that it remains today. It is no longer a city of neighborhoods in that old sense. Why did the party end? It died down for a number of reasons. You have to consider Mayor Giuliani as one of the reasons. Also, you have the rise of community boards, the incredible difficulty getting liquor licenses, things of that nature. Club life was kind of shut down. Like I say, with the rents, and a huge mass of people moving out to Brooklyn, obviously, that is going to have an effect. I don’t think we should get nostalgic for squalor and poverty, but on the other hand but it is better than the 99.9 percent to .1 percent situation these days.  Published: June 25, 2015 Read full article here

Barbara Hepworth in der Tate Britain
25/06/2015
Language German, Austria Featured: 0Order: 0Slideshow location: Slideshow ICONTags: Barbara HepworthTate BritainPopular Cities: LondonAuthor(s): BLOUIN ARTINFO DeutschlandSub-Channels: MuseumsReferenced Artists: Dame Barbara HepworthShort Title : Barbara Hepworth in der Tate Britain Read full article here

Barbara Hepworth in der Tate Britain
25/06/2015
Language German Featured: 0Order: 0Slideshow location: Slideshow ICONTags: Barbara HepworthTate BritainPopular Cities: LondonAuthor(s): BLOUIN ARTINFO DeutschlandSub-Channels: MuseumsReferenced Artists: Dame Barbara HepworthShort Title : Barbara Hepworth in der Tate Britain Read full article here

Top 5 Art Events in Japan, Summer 2015
25/06/2015
Language English, Japan Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Darryl Jingwen WeeSub-Channels: FeaturesShort Title : Top 5 Art Events in Japan, Summer 2015Home Top Story: Top Story - English, Japan Read full article here

Céleste Boursier-Mougenot’s “Acquaalta” at Palais de Tokyo
25/06/2015
Céleste Boursier-Mougenot’s “Acquaalta” at Palais de TokyoFrench artist and composer Céleste Boursier-Mougenot, France’s representative at the 2015 Venice Biennale, has transformed the exhibition spaces of Paris’s Palais de Tokyo with a major installation that draws inspiration from the phenomenon of Acqua alta, the annual flood in the Venetian lagoon. Boursier-Mougenot’s lakeside landscape leads visitors into a tactile, visual, and auditory experience that alters their perception of the space. As they move across the flooded space, visitors encounter a stream of images that set the scene for an imaginary journey, “a voyage through their own psyche,” in which their movements are filmed and re-projected directly onto the walls. Guided by a sound wave system that connects the different flows (visitors, water, video, and sound), visitors find themselves on an island where they can lie down to fully immerse themselves in the surrounding images. “This dreamlike universe is a nod to both ancient mythology (from Narcissus drowning in his reflection to Ulysses resisting the sirens’ song) and the cinema (the children escaping in a boat in The Night of the Hunter). Here the relationship between nature and culture is reversed and the artist is, in his own words, ‘a simple medium through which visitors can give shape to their sensations,’ or lose themselves in the hypnotic sounds and images,” explains Daria de Beauvais, exhibition curator. Céleste Boursier-Mougenot’s “Acquaalta” is at Palais de Tokyo until September 13, 2015. Published: June 24, 2015 Read full article here

Rare Klimpt Portrait Sells for £24.8m at Sotheby’s London
25/06/2015
Rare Klimpt Portrait Sells for £24.8m at Sotheby’s LondonSotheby’s has achieved the second highest total for any sale ever held in London with its June 25, 2015 Evening Sale of Impressionist & Modern Art, realizing £178.6m / $282.1m / €250.9m against a pre-sale estimate of £140.3-203.2m / $221.5-320.9m / €197-285.5m. An unprecedented seven works sold for over £10m including Gustav Klimt’s 1902 “Portrait of Gertrud Loew - Gertha Felsőványi,” which after a ten minute bidding battle sold for £24.8m / $39.1m / €34.8m – the second highest price for a portrait by the artist at auction. A new record was also set for any sculpture by Degas whose “Petite danseuse de quatorze ans” (1922) sold for £15.8m / $24.9m / €22.2m. Helena Newman, Sotheby’s Co-Head, Impressionist & Modern Art Worldwide, said: “Tonight’s sale was led by three exceptional restituted works, each of the highest calibre and each with its own story to tell. Over recent years advances in the process restitution have added a new dimension to our sales, bringing to the market outstanding works such as those offered tonight by Klimt, Liebermann and Malevich. It’s hugely rewarding to see these paintings such strong prices achieved for the heirs of their original owners.” Melanie Clore, Chairman, Sotheby’s Europe & Co-Chairman Worldwide, Impressionist & Modern Art, said: “Tonight’s result is testament to the truly outstanding quality of the works on offer. To follow our highest totals for Impressionist and Modern art sales in New York, with another sensational sale in London, emphasises the strength of what is undoubtedly a truly global market. Our worldwide network of specialists are working with a broader collector base than ever before, so whether it’s New York, London, or any of our worldwide selling locations, we are seeing incredibly strong results across the board.” Published: June 24, 2015 Read full article here

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