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International Contemporary Furniture Fair Set for 2014
04/04/2014
International Contemporary Furniture Fair Set for 2014North America’s premier platform for what’s up-and-coming in contemporary design, the 26th annual International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF), returns May 17 to 20 to the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York City, bringing together 570 exhibitors from 33 countries, touting the best in design of furniture, flooring, lighting, and materials over 165,000 square feet space. Like a fashion week for furniture, the fair is where designers go to launch their new creations and where the public goes to get a glimpse of what's new in the world of design. Branch chandeliers were popularized here, as were technology-friendly tables and consoles. This year’s fair has filled up 30 percent more quickly than last year, and will draw close to 30,000 interior designers, architects, retailers, developers, facility managers, wholesalers, store design professionals, hotel and restaurant designers, and manufacturers. Produced and managed by GLM, ICFF is also debuting a few partnerships, including one with Architizer on their second annual A+ Awards, which honors the best architecture, spaces, and products in more than 60 categories, and another with the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) to present an array of educational sessions during the fair’s run. Confirmed exhibitors for ICFF 2014 include: Assembly Design, Calico Wallpaper, Council, Egg Collective, Flavor Paper, Fritz Hansen, Gabriel Scott, Inside Norway, Interiors from Spain, Kasthall USA Inc., Lladro, O&G, Phillip Jeffries, Rich Brilliant Willing, and Vitra. International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF), May 17 to 20, Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York City Published: April 4, 2014 Read full article here

Guam - Relaxation and Adventure on America’s Most Distant Territory
04/04/2014
Body: Let BLOUIN ARTINFO be your guide to the small island of Guam, the USA’s most far-flung territory. Language English Order: 0Trip IdeasArt + CultureFood + DrinkBeach + IslandHotels + ResortsSee + DoRobert Michael PooleTop Story Home: Top Story - Channel: Exclude from Landing: Global Region: PacificFeature Image: Thumbnail Image: Tags: GuamPacific islandsRegion: Asia-PacificSlide:  Title: INTRODUCING: GuamImage: Body: Situated in the far west Pacific, south of Japan and east of the Philippines, the small island of Guam is the USA’s most far-flung territory. Part of Micronesia, a group of islands that includes the diving paradise of Palau, the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), the Marshall Islands and Kiribati, it is often overlooked as a destination compared to the more well-known tropical paradise islands of the region. But the fact it is less frequented by independent travels is part of the appeal. Escape the resorts booked full by Japanese and Korean tourists, and Guam has plenty to offer. Home to the indigenous Chamorro people, who have exhibited Hispanic customs in their language, music and cuisine since Spanish colonial rule from 1668 until 1898, Guam is Hawaii-lite. Though lacking Hawaii’s rampant commercialization, Guam  nevertheless combines modern American conveniences of megamalls, fast-food restaurants and a strong military presence, with a surprising amount of untouched greenery, hiking trails, white sand beaches, and small local towns around its coastline. Visitors will need their own four wheels to explore, but once out on the road, visitors can find plenty of essential places to stop; from lively night markets and the romantic “Two Lover’s Point” to one of the most extraordinary remnants of World War II – The Yokoi Hideout. Let BLOUIN ARTINFO be your guide. Credit: Robert Michael Poole Title: STAY: Hotel Santa FeImage: Body: Guam is sprinkled with its fair share of resorts rammed with package tourists, mostly from Japan and Korea, but it does have one gem of an independent boutique hotel in a prime location in Hagatna Bay, where jetskiers skim across turquoise waters in front of the picturesque tree-lined Alupang Island. With its own line of beach and “infinity” swimming pool, the privately run Hotel Santa Fe has a local island atmosphere to it, with an Oceanside Cocktail Bar and terrace in the shade of palm trees. Despite its seemingly small size, it contains 105 guest rooms with ample room, some of which include large Jacuzzis in their centers. Live music is performed nightly at The Grille, which specialities in Spanish heritage food including paella and empanadas. Hotel Santa Fe also perfectly located and will offer guests all the help they need to get around, including to the nearby Chamarro Village and night market. Hotel Santa Fe: 132 Lagoon Drive Tamuning, Guam 96913, tel. +1 671 647 8855 Credit: Courtesy Hotel Santa Fe Title: EAT: Lemai Cafe & RestaurantImage: Body: Most of Guam’s restaurants cater to a distinctly American taste, but it's in the markets where the locally grown food can be food, from fresh coconut to star fruit, tuba to papaya. To taste these and more cooked the Guamanian way, the best place to stop is Lemai Café & Restaurant, where the menu features exotic names like kadu, fritada, beef tinaktak, and chicken chalakilis, was named after a grove of breadfruit trees that lay right beside the open-terrace eatery, and where you can see the fruits growing before they are picked when ripe to eat. The breadfruit are used in Chamorro-style doughnuts called buñelos lemmai, baked with seasonal yam, banana or mango. For those unlucky to find themselves in bad weather, Lemai is prepared for that too, offering its homemade dishes in a Quonset hut, a corrugated metal structure that originated in Rhode Island and spread during to Guam during World War II. Lemai Café & Restaurant: 673 Purple Heart Highway, Route 8 Maite, Guam 96910, tel. +1 671-475-6262 Credit: Courtesy Lemai Cafe & Restaurant Title: DRINK: Jeff’s Pirates CoveImage: Body: Just outside of picturesque Talafofo, Jeff’s Pirates Cove is quite the trek, but a stop well worth it for those circling the south of the island. Established in 1952, it’s much more than just a bar, offering a Sea Museum and some of Guam’s most famous seafood – but the bar itself, shaped like a ship and named the S.S Genereux, plays center stage. The Cove comes with quite a story too. It was acquired as a quiet beach bar by Jeff Pleadwell in 1979, who was named one of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s 10 environmental heroes for his work improving ocean safety, and preserving coral reefs. The former Las Vegas chauffeur then set about developing the property, opening a 5,000 square foot A-frame Seaside Museum in 2000. Still a local spot for islanders in the south, those who stop by can expect to occasionally wander in on local community events, as well as share a tipple on the port or starboard of the S.S Genereux. Credit: Robert Michael Poole Title: SEE (1): Two Lovers PointImage: Body: Designated a National Natural Landmark, Two Lovers Point (“Puntan Dos Amantes”) is not just a place for romantics – it also offers one of the best views of Guam’s coastline. Perched high above the sea, the lookout is the site of a legend that dates back to Spain’s rule of Guam. According to the story, a wealthy aristocratic father and his Chamorro wife arranged for their daughter, known for her beauty and charm, to marry a Spanish captain. Upon discovering this, the young girl fled, and hid on shores in the north of Guam, where she met and fell in love with young warrior from a local Chamorro village. Her father heard of the news, and along with the captain chased the two lovers to the cliffs over Tumon Bay, where the couple tied their hair together and jumped in to the sea. The area is ablaze with messages tied along the railings on pink heart-shaped tablets, written in languages of visitors from around the world. Credit: Robert Michael Poole Title: SEE (2): Gef Pa'go Chamorro Cultural VillageImage: Body: Little remains of Guam’s old culture, but fortunately there are efforts to preserve it, and a drive to southern town of Inarajan can give a little insight into past times. The Gef Pa’go Cultural Village has been listed in the National Register of Historic Places since 1977, and though a small area, gives a sense of traditional culture, with eight thatch-roof huts and a small store selling crafts. The highlight though is the living museum, in which some of the elder Chamorro people show how they used their rudimentary tools for making rope, and cutting and craving coconuts into sweets. Just opposite the village, and well worth a wander, are streets the represent another step in Guam’s history. Houses occupied by early Spanish settlers, with colorful painted murals still visible on the walls, are largely being returned to nature. But ask at the village and they will take you inside one locked house that is being kept for posterity. Credit: Robert Michael Poole Title: SEE (3): Soldier Yokoi HideoutImage: Body: One of Guam’s most famous ever resident’s is one of the least likely. There are many tales of Japanese soldiers who were left stranded across Pacific islands at the end of World War II, but perhaps the most famous of these is Sergeant Shoichi Yokoi, whose story led to him meeting Emperor Akihito in 1991. Yokoi hid in the jungles of Guam in July 1944, when U.S. forces stormed the island. With contact to command lost, he dug a hideout below the ground, covering it in bamboo, where he committed to waiting until his fellow soldiers came to recover him. It wasn’t until 28 years later, in 1972, that farmers from Talofofo found him, and though he begged to be killed, he returned to Japan to a heros welcome. His cave was eventually destroyed in a typhoon, but a recreation of it can be found at Talofofo Falls Resort Park, while his tools are preserved at the Guam Museum in Hagåtña. Credit: Robert Michael Poole Title: BUY: Chamarro VillageImage: Body: Observing is as much fun as purchasing crafts and gifts at Chamarro Village, a bustling night market that takes places every Wednesday night from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Traditional villages dances entertain hundreds of visitors, mostly from Japan and Korea, on the outdoor stage, while in the market’s center, live bands perform Latin music and the elder locals persuade their guests to dance tango and salsa with them. The best purchases are the local food, including BBQ meats, banana lumpia (banana eggrolls in honey), and all manner of fresh juices. But with tiny independent stores tucked away in the old-Spanish style buildings, there are also plenty of unique artworks and crafts to be had. Credit: Robert Michael Poole Title: DO: Ritidian BeachImage: Body: Guam has failed to gain the reputation of other Pacific islands when it comes to idyllic beaches, but anyone claiming that the resorts have claimed them all is probably just trying to steer you away from the quietest white beach that can still be found deserted – Ritidian. Visitors will need their own four wheels to reach the island’s most northern tip, Ritidian Point, reached via access road 3A, a bumpy gravel track that might seem like heading to nowhere. But at its end can be found the Guam National Wildlife Refuge Ritidian Unit, and pristine white sands which are weekdays especially, you can have all to yourself. Credit: Robert Michael Poole Cover image: Short title: Guam - Relaxation on America’s Distant TerritoryTop Story France: Top Story - Australia: Top Story - Canada: Top Story - HK: Top Story - India: Top Story - UK: Top Story - China: Top Story - Brazil: Top Story - Germany: Top Story Russia: Top Story - Southeast Asia: Top Story - English, Chinese: Top Story - Korea: Top Story - Japan: Top Story - English, Japan: Top Story - English, Korea: Top Story - Italy: Top Story - Austria: Top Story - Mexico: Top Story - Spain: Top Story - Colombia:  Read full article here

Baselworld 2014 - Art on the Wrist
04/04/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Tags: Baselworld 2014Art on the WristDeLaneauJaquet DrozVulcainKari Voutilainenlouis moinetCorumLa Montre HermèsSonia Kolesnikov-JessopAuthor(s): Sonia Kolesnikov-Jessop Read full article here

BLOUIN Lifestyle Pick: Artcurial's Jewelry and Watch Sale
04/04/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Michelle Tay Read full article here

Performing Arts Pick: Miles Davis at the Fillmore
03/04/2014
Performing Arts Pick: Miles Davis at the FillmoreAlong with the revival tour, a hallmark of the artist in our modern age is what I call the “prestige album.” Remastered classics, unearthed outtakes, and officially sanctioned bootlegs — the prestige album takes many forms. They are an important part of extending an artist’s legacy, and sometimes demystify their career (Bob Dylan’s “Bootleg Series” has gone a long way to humanizing the famously closed-off singer). The prestige album is also the easiest way for a record company to keep making money off an artist, sometimes even after they’ve passed away. Which brings us to today’s Performing Arts Pick: “Miles at the Fillmore - Miles Davis 1970: The Bootleg Series Vol. 3.” Released by Columbia/Legacy in a four-disc set, each one representing a consecutive night Davis and his band (which at this time consisted of Chick Corea, Keith Jarrett, Dave Holland, Jack DeJohnette, Airto Moreira, and Steve Grossman) performed at the Fillmore East club in New York City. (A former Yiddish theater located in the heart of it all on Second Avenue near East Sixth Street, the Fillmore East opened in March 1968 only to close three years later, in June 1971.) The run of shows, which circulated in poor quality bootlegs for decades as well as part of the edited-down “Miles Davis at Fillmore” album released in 1970, are presented here in full for the first time as an official release. The moment was a period of transition for Davis, one that began with the dissolution of his Second Great Quintet (Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter, and Tony Williams) and the release of “In a Silent Way,” which, in a Rolling Stone review, was signaled by critic Lester Bangs as the sound of “new music in the air… a total art which knows no boundaries or categories, a new school run by geniuses indifferent to fashion.” In years hence, the album’s influence on electronic, rock, and jazz music has been acknowledged, maybe even overstated. Two months prior to the shows at the Fillmore, Davis released “Bitches Brew,” which took his experimentation even further (he also played the Fillmore in April 1970, opening for Neil Young and Steve Miller, which resulted in the live album “Black Beauty”). It was clear he was shedding his be-bop skin, and the Fillmore shows, even at their most indulgent, are always fascinating. They are part of a group of recordings the critic Phil Freeman, in his book “Running the Voodoo Down,” has called Davis’s “openly hostile albums” that thrive on disruption and chaos. The jams are chaotic, full of masculine energy. At times, especially in the dueling electric piano and organ of Jarrett and Corea, it seems as if the musicians are engaging in fistfights through their instruments on stage. A few months later, Davis would dismantle the band. Stasis would not suffice. As soon as something felt cemented, he would move on, often times drastically. Less than a year after the shows at the Fillmore, Davis would record the more aggressive “Jack Johnson” album, followed by the even more severe “On the Corner” album a year after that. His live records of the mid-to-late 1970s — my favorite is “Dark Magus” — are closer to noise music than jazz at times, and are some of the most challenging and captivating recordings of the last century. But it wouldn’t last. In late 1975, Davis would mostly withdraw from public life for a number of years. When he reemerged, we were in a new decade and he had shed his skin once again, returning to a more traditional, if slicker, sound that he would explore until the end of his life.  Published: April 3, 2014 Read full article here

Museum of Arts and Design Bids Adieu to Chief Curator
03/04/2014
The focus of “Re: Collection,” the Museum of Arts and Design’s farewell exhibition to recently retired chief curator David McFadden, “is not about me,” McFadden insists, but rather, about “people who know what they’re doing.” Not that McFadden doesn’t know what he’s doing — quite the contrary. Prior to announcing his retirement in October, he served a 16-year tenure at the museum. As a final send-off, MAD asked that he put together a show of greatest hits pulled from the acquisitions made during that period, in which the collection tripled, growing from 800 pieces to more than 3,000. “My first cut had almost 200 objects,” McFadden told ARTINFO over the phone, “and then the reality of the gallery space set in.” After painstakingly hewing down his selections, he produced a densely packed, 70-piece exhibition of a wide breadth of media, sculpture, jewelry, ceramics, furniture, and textiles meant to highlight various aspects of the museum’s history. McFadden said that he stuck to “work that is extremely accomplished in its physical fabrication,” many methods of which are experimental. The exhibition spans late 19th-century Moroccan silversmithing to contemporary works, like Nendo’s 2008 Cabbage Chair Prototype, comprised of hundreds of sheets of discarded paper rolled into a tube and slit down the middle to unfold into a seat, and Jennifer Trask’s “Intrinsecus,” 2010, a shiny play on the 17th-century vanitas, tailored to MAD’s 2010 “Dead or Alive” show by incorporating gilded animal remains. “Re: Collection” also highlights the tendency of artists to make forays into crafts atypical of their bodies of work: Judy Chicago and Audrey Cowan’s large-scale tapestry “The Fall (from the Holocaust Project),” 1993, blankets a gallery wall with woven images of thousands of years’ worth of atrocities; Cindy Sherman’s “Madame de Pompadour (née Poisson),” 1990, transfers her signature self-portrait work onto a design object.  The show is a rarity in that, given the occasion, its curator was able to provide his personal point of view. Each object is presented alongside a narrative that reinforces its relevance, either to the museum or to the artist. Sandy Skoglun’s “Breathing Glass,” 2000, for example, a photograph of sculpted mosaic, is an image that marks the moment the museum bridged photography with three-dimensional art. Belarus-born Vitra Mitrichenka’s “Victoria” tea set, 2008, a sculptural collage of shards of china, is an homage to her Russian grandmother who had always insisted on reusing rather than discarding broken wares. “All of these objects speak to us,” McFadden said. While it sounds cliché, the selection of greatest hits, culled from the museum’s past, actually sets down a trajectory for museums to follow when considering design, a point that some seem to have lost. It’s not “objects that are made just to look good,” McFadden continued. “They have tremendous reverberations throughout culture, society, ideas about ourselves, relationships about each other, and the human condition.” “Re: Collection” is on view at the Museum of Arts and Design through September 7. Click on the slideshow to see highlights from the exhibition. Museum of Arts and Design Bids Adieu to Chief CuratorSelect Photo Gallery: Slideshow: MAD Bids Adieu to Chief Curator - "Re:Collection"Published: April 3, 2014 Read full article here

Slideshow: Watch the 3D Printing of a Canal House in Amsterdam
03/04/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Benjamin Park Read full article here

Cambridge
03/04/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: http://web.mit.edu/lvac/www/menu/menu.htmlDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: SouthWest LondonLocation Phone: +1 617 253 4680Admissions: FreeCollections: Painting, sculpture, photography, and print mediaHas Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: Tuesday to Sunday 12PM to 6PM<br />Friday 12PM to 8PMlocation fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

BLOUIN Lifestyle Pick: Artcurial's Jewelry and Watch Sale
03/04/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Michelle Tay Read full article here

Zanele Muholi at Wentrup
03/04/2014
Artist: Zanele Muholi Venue: Wentrup, Berlin Exhibition Title: Selected FACES&PHASES and BEULAHS Date: January 18 – February 28, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of video, images, press release and link available after the jump. Video: Zanele Muholi, Visual Activist, directed by Katherine Fairfax Wright, Malika Zouhali-Worrallo, and Zanele Muholi, 2013. Courtesy of Human Rights Watch. […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

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