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North Korea Art Exhibition Hits London, Picasso Thieves Head to Trial, and More
04/11/2014
North Korea Art Exhibition Hits London, Picasso Thieves Head to Trial, and More— North Korea Art Exhibition Hits London: A group of four artists from Pyongyang’s Mansudae Art Studio — which is charged with creating all official images of the Kim family — were invited to tour London for three weeks and paint what they saw. Today, London’s North Korean embassy opens its doors to the public for the first time to display the works. “I believe culture has an enormously important role to play in developing relationships between people,” said David Heather, the exhibition’s organizer. “And, for want of a better word, it shows that North Korean people are ‘normal.’” [Telegraph, BBC] — Picasso Thieves Head to Trial: Retried electrician Pierre Le Guennec, 75, and his wife, Danielle, 71, will head to court on February 10, 2015, to be tried for receiving stolen goods — specifically a bevy of Picasso works. In 2010, the couple came forward with their collection of approximately 180 paintings, drawings, and lithographs, plus two notebooks containing 91 sketches. They claimed that they had received the items as a gift from the artist, for whom Le Guennec had once worked. Shortly thereafter, however, a theory arose that the works were stolen by Picasso’s chauffeur Maurice Bresnu, who passed away in 1991 — and that the couple simply waited for the statute of limitations to run out before coming forward. [TAN] — Getty President’s Antiquities Manifesto: J. Paul Getty Trust president James Cuno penned an article for this month’s edition of Foreign Affairs, titled “Culture War: The Case Against Repatriating Museum Artifacts,” in which he argues, “Cultural property should be recognized for what it is: the legacy of humankind and not of the modern nation-state, subject to the political agenda of its current ruling elite.” A spokesperson for Cuno clarified that this piece was commissioned before the recent developments in the case of the Elgin Marbles and is not intended as a comment thereupon. Rather, Cuno’s argument concerns artworks acquired legally in the 19th and 20th centuries, which he would like to see become part of a series of multicultural “encyclopaedic museums” around the world. [LAT, TAN] — Lauren Bacall’s Sculptor Crush: In a handwritten letter up for auction today at Bonhams, the late Lauren Bacall makes plain to British sculptor Henry Moore just how much she admired him: “It was and will ever be a high point in my life, the realization of a dream — to actually meet you and then spend time with you.” [LAT] — Christie’s Debuts New Galleries: Opening this month, the 11,000-square-foot space on the ground floor of Christie’s Rockefeller Plaza location will specialize in private sales — or, in their own words, “bespoke experiences for collectors to connect with art, objects, jewels and watches.” [ARTnews] — George Lucas Museum Design Unveiled: The building proposed by MAD Architects’ Ma Yansong is a space-age volcano straight out of “Star Wars.” [ArchDaily] — The latest in Vladimir Putin fan art shows the Russian leader spanking President Obama. [NY Mag] — The British Museum has released scans of its artefacts so you can 3D-print them at home. [Independent] — New York’s Churner & Churner gallery is closing at the end of November. [ARTnews] ALSO ON ARTINFO Q&A: Curator Zoe Ryan On the Istanbul Design Biennial Art Basel Hong Kong Announces 2015 Exhibitor List Between Normality and Madness: Rainer Werner Fassbinder On the Block: What to Look for at Auction in November Check our blog IN THE AIR for breaking news throughout the day. Published: November 4, 2014 Read full article here

Karthik Pandian at Federica Schiavo
04/11/2014
Artist: Karthik Pandian Venue: Federica Schiavo, Rome Exhibition Title: Snails and Oysters Date: September 25 – November 8, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of videos, images, press release and link available after the jump. Videos: Karthik Pandian, Caracalla, 2014, HD Video, 3 min 9 sec looped. Courtesy Federica Schiavo, Rome.   Karthik Pandian, Victory, 2014, HD […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Q&A: Curator Zoe Ryan On the Istanbul Design Biennial
04/11/2014
With the memory of Gezi Park protests still fresh in Istanbul, the city offers a rich topography for addressing the concerns that drove protesters in the Turkish capital and beyond to the streets. The second edition of the Istanbul Design Biennial, which opened on November 1 at the Galata Greek Primary School, plans to examine the protests and their global ramifications more than a year later, under the theme “The Future Is Not What It Used to Be.” Presenting manifestos from 75 Turkish and international designers, the six-week display seeks to explore the role of architects and designers in developing new, pragmatic directions for the urban future. Selected projects include grasshopper cultivation for human consumption, data visualization of design tweets, and a studio where visitors can commission a bespoke manifesto. Biennial curator Zoe Ryan spoke with ARTINFO about organizing the biennial and re-examining the manifesto as an object of design’s political agency. What was your process when you first arrived in Istanbul? How did you determine what the critical questions and agendas on the ground were? How did you begin your engagement with Turkish designers? I brought on an associate curator, Meredith Carruthers, and together we started going back and forth to Turkey. It was a very interesting moment last summer, when we were going back and forth to and from Turkey. Obviously, the Gezi protest was in full swing, so there was a lot of emotion and a lot of frank discussion in Turkey — very political, and the conversations were very rich. We knew that we really wanted to get to know the community at Gezi, seeing as some of the brightest minds in the city were there. So we set up these roundtable discussions — very loose and informal — over the course of a couple days, we did a talk tour of sorts. And the people who were part of that will be popping up in the biennial as part of weekly discussions, which will go back to those early days. When we first went to Turkey, I did a lot of studio visits and met a lot of people and had very broad conversations. But I realized that I can only do so much by doing these kind of one-on-one meeting. So we started doing these roundtable discussions, and people were very generous — they didn’t know who we were. All we asked them to do was to bring a conversation starter — what did they think were some of the most critical issues in architecture and design today? And also we asked them who they thought some of the best people working in the field were, and it was amazing. People were so open. The Turkish community of architects and designers is very well educated. People have worked or studied abroad and come back; many have Ph.Ds. They’ve gone to different schools like Parsons in New York or the Royal College of Art and they’re coming back with a very broad range of topics within the disciplines of design and architecture. From that, we developed a core group, a kind of Istanbul advisory. And then we have an international advisory of curators, critics, and other thinkers who have helped us shape the proposals. Were you involved with the Gezi Park protests at all? We arrived a couple of times and they were going on, and people in front of us were getting tear-gassed. I did not get involved personally in the protests, but we absolutely saw them, and while we were doing studio visits, meetings, and such, the designers were going to Gezi Park, they were making medical supplies, they were really engaged in the process. Obviously, we had many conversations and learned a lot from them. But we also knew that the biennial was taking place a year and a half later, and we knew that the atmosphere and the political climate would be quite different. So we didn’t want to do a kind of direct response to those activities then, because we knew we’d have this whole year to contemplate and digest what had happened. So what elements of the biennial do you think respond to Gezi Park? A lot of thinking! The thing about Gezi Park is that it’s not an isolated event. It was part of social uprisings and domestic upheavals going on in the entire world. So, design and architecture are inextricably linked to our daily lives — they help us understand our political and economic systems. So when we were thinking about the theme — this quote that I found, “The future is not what it used to be” — I really felt that it applied not only to the Turkish community but also to the international community, where we are really seeking out new alternatives. And how did that theme, derived from the quote, inspire you to reconsider the manifesto and its possibilities today? We are trying to look back at the 20th century and the early 21st century and see what we have achieved and what we haven’t achieved. The big visions that came about in the past century for architecture and design — how far have we come, in a way? And then charging people to rethink the manifesto, so we also spent a lot of time making sure that… when you say “manifesto,” it’s an extremely large and loaded word, with connotations that are not always positive. We spent a lot of time thinking about this context. You know, this is only the second Istanbul Design Biennial — and it was a moment of social and political change, and so it was a moment for us to have to tackle that with a big theme. We obviously looked at the history of manifestos, the large claims and the loud voices, and we also saw that, in the middle of the 20th century, people were trying to tweak manifestos to make them more relevant. Which manifestos, for example? So you have Robert Venturi’s gentle manifesto, “Complexity and Contradiction,” in 1966, or [Rem Koolhaas’s] “Delirious New York,” which is a retroactive manifesto. All of these are quite ironic because a manifesto is never supposed to be gentle or retroactive or incomplete, with people being allowed to add their own ideas. But we understood that people still like manifesto as platforms for bringing together ideas and purposes, but at the same time we wanted to ask, “Is it possible to have a manifesto today and what would it look like?” Not only as statements but potentially as a map, a piece of furniture, a building, an action, or provocation. And how did that inform the process of organizing the biennial? So, we did an international competition and got about 800 submissions. As you can see in the biennial, they’re radically different from one to the next. But there are some major themes that run through them — many of the projects deal with very basic human needs, and issues about survival, and our wellbeing and health. And these, I think, are the kind of issues that really relate to Gezi. There’s the Architecture for All — which is a loose collective — project based on ad-hoc furniture like picnic tables and shelters built by people on the ground while they were doing the Gezi live-in; they documented this in beautiful drawings and illustrations, and we’ve asked them to turn these into a zine that they are handing out at the biennial. And with that, they’re asking what it means when architecture is taken out of the hands of architects. There are four or five main themes that drive the biennial, all these loose categories that help the viewer hopefully navigate this rich and diverse body of work — 54 projects in the show, more than 20 countries represented. They start with the idea of contracts. Something that’s very important to manifestos is how they get distributed, the circulation through mass media. “Vers Une Architecture” by Corbusier was published in L’Esprit Nouveau, the publication. Publications have always been a really amazing format for new ideas. So we wanted to do our own publications, and we have a live radio program that we’ll be doing public programming throughout spaces in the city. We’ll also be doing videos and films, and have discussions and screenings happening in what we’re calling the “hub” space. The broadcast station is in the main assembly hall, and that will be what you first encounter. Also, Project Projects designed an amazing typeface for the biennial that leans backwards and forwards depending on how you look at it. And the Greek School is an amazing, amazing building. Q&A: Curator Zoe Ryan On the Istanbul Design BiennialSelect Photo Gallery: Slideshow: Highlights from the Istanbul Design Biennial 2014 Published: November 4, 2014 Read full article here

Los Angeles
03/11/2014
Language English Location Website: http://www.mannysilvermangallery.comDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: DowntownMonday - Close: 12:00amTuesday - Open: 12:00amTuesday - Close: 12:00amWednesday - Open: 12:00amWednesday - Close: 12:00amThursday - Open: 12:00amThursday - Close: 12:00amFriday - Open: 12:00amFriday - Close: 12:00amLocation Phone: +1 310 659 8256 Saturday - Open: 12:00amSaturday - Close: 12:00amSunday - Open: 12:00amSunday - Close: 12:00amMonday - Open: 12:00amHas Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: Tuesday to Saturday 10AM to 5PMLocation Logo: location fax: +1 310 659 1001Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: West Read full article here

New York
03/11/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.the-maac.comDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: FiftiesLocation Phone: +1 212 355 4400Admissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

New York
03/11/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.littlejohncontemporary.comLocation Email: info@littlejohncontemporary.comDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: SeventiesLocation Phone: +1 212 988 4890Admissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: By appointment dailyLocation Logo: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

Chelsea
03/11/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: http://leilahellergallery.com/Facebook Website: http://www.facebook.com/leilahellergalleryTwitter Website: https://twitter.com/LeilaHellerGLocation Email: jessica@leilahellergallery.comTitle: Business directorFirst name: JessicaLast name: DavidsonEmail: jessica@leilahellergallery.comPhone: 2122497695Salutation: Ms.Display: DisplayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: ChelseaMonday - Close: 06:00pmTuesday - Open: 10:00amTuesday - Close: 06:00pmWednesday - Open: 10:00amWednesday - Close: 06:00pmThursday - Open: 10:00amThursday - Close: 06:00pmFriday - Open: 10:00amFriday - Close: 06:00pmLocation Phone: +1 212 249 7695Statement: Leila Heller Gallery (formerly LTMH Gallery) located in the heart of Chelsea’s gallery district, promotes a cutting edge program of international contemporary emerging and mid-career artists. The gallery has gained recognition for fostering the careers of artists working across a multitude of disciplines and mediums, helping to establish them among the leading contemporary artists internationally. The gallery presents a dynamic exhibition schedule, actively engaging world renowned curators, hosting educational panels and producing catalogues with scholarly essays. The Gallery also participates in major international art fairs each year and stages offsite projects as a continuation of the program. Gallery artists have consistently participated in major international exhibitions and biennials, and are included in important institutional collections worldwide. The gallery has gained worldwide recognition for being a pioneer in promoting contemporary Middle Eastern artists. This specialization has positioned the gallery well within the burgeoning Iranian, Turkish and Middle Eastern art market. Most importantly, it is the gallery's mission to establish contemporary Middle Eastern art within a larger cultural and Art Historical context. The gallery remains dedicated to promoting the careers of its artists, and is ambitious in growing its program. In addition to its roster of contemporary artists, the gallery is also active in the American, European and Middle Eastern secondary art markets. With all of the gallery’s activities, it remains committed to fostering long-lasting bonds within the global art world through its professionalism and innovative vision. Leila Heller Gallery artists have been included in leading national and international museums and institutions, such as The New Museum, New York; the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, New York; the Chelsea Art Museum, New York; Asia Art Society, New York; the Farjam Collection, Dubai; the National Museum of Contemporary Art, Korea; Domus Atrium Museum, Salamanca Spain; Santral Istanbul Contemporary Art Museum, Turkey; Petacha Tikva Museum of Art, Israel; Hiroshima Contemporary Art Museum, Hiroshima, Japan; The Victoria & Albert Museum, London; and the Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art, Iran. After being based for 29 years on the Upper East Side, in 2011 the gallery moved to a 3,500 square foot ground floor space in the Chelsea gallery district, at 568 West 25th Street at the corner of 11th Avenue. The move to the new Chelsea location, designed by award-winning architect firm Hariri & Hariri, has allowed for an expansion of the gallery's internationally recognized artist roster as well as for larger, museum quality exhibitions. The gallery also maintains a rigorous art fair schedule, participating in fairs in New York, Los Angeles, Miami, Hong Kong, Paris, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, and Istanbul.Saturday - Open: 10:00amSaturday - Close: 06:00pmSunday - Open: 12:00amSunday - Close: 12:00amMonday - Open: 10:00amHas Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: +1 212 249 7693Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

Rosemont
03/11/2014
Language English Location Website: http://www.rosemont.eduLocation Email: rperry@rosemont.eduLast name: perryEmail: rperry@rosemont.eduPhone: 610.527.0200 Display: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Monday - Close: 12:00amTuesday - Open: 12:00amTuesday - Close: 12:00amWednesday - Open: 12:00amWednesday - Close: 12:00amThursday - Open: 12:00amThursday - Close: 12:00amFriday - Open: 12:00amFriday - Close: 12:00amLocation Phone: +1 610 526 2967Saturday - Open: 12:00amSaturday - Close: 12:00amSunday - Open: 12:00amSunday - Close: 12:00amMonday - Open: 12:00amHas Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

New York, 20th Street
03/11/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.kimfostergallery.comLocation Email: info@kimfostergallery.comBrief info:   Kim Foster Gallery promotes a select group of contemporary artists that have been with the gallery for over a decade. The gallery is focused on enabling these artists to explore and evolve in significantly different ways, but with remarkable coherence within the gallery’s affinity towards unconventional work. These artists deviate from traditional mediums and instead have developed entirely new methods and sophisticated techniques that often require massive hand labor and the assistance of specialists. For example, Jim Toia’s newest project involves creating sculptures of abandoned leaf cutter ant colonies that he cast with the assistance of entomologists and engineers from the University of Texas. Diane Samuels’s recent commission, a hand engraved glass pedestrian bridge for Brown University, required her inventing a patent-pending method for constructing glass windows. The gallery has established long lasting relationships with its artists, encouraging exploration of their unique style. Kim Foster, Owner/Director Kim Foster Gallery 529 West 20th Street New York, NY 10011 Tel/Fax: (212) 229-0044 Email:info@kimfostergallery.com  Display: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: ChelseaMonday - Close: 12:00amTuesday - Open: 11:00amTuesday - Close: 06:00pmWednesday - Open: 11:00amWednesday - Close: 06:00pmThursday - Open: 11:00amThursday - Close: 06:00pmFriday - Open: 11:00amFriday - Close: 06:00pmLocation Phone: +1 212 229 0044Saturday - Open: 11:00amSaturday - Close: 06:00pmSunday - Open: 12:00amSunday - Close: 12:00amMonday - Open: 12:00amHas Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: Tuesday through Saturday 11am to 6pmlocation fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

Between Normality and Madness: Rainer Werner Fassbinder
03/11/2014
Between Normality and Madness: Rainer Werner FassbinderThe work of Rainer Werner Fassbinder (1945-1982), the prolific German film director, will be featured in the second-part of a split-in-two retrospective at the Film Society of Lincoln Center, running November 7 through 26. I wrote about the first part back in May, and touched on the different forms of doubling Fassbinder utilizes in his films, from the spacial organization of his camera compositions to narrative structure. I’d like to continue on the subject, this time with a focus on his female characters and how they occupy, to steal the words from film historian Christian Braad Thomsen, “the difficult border zone between normality and madness.” This space between is what gives Fassbinder’s work its tension. Marked by a surface cruelty, his films can be hard to watch. “Lola” (November 14, 17), the story of a bordello performer who seduces a straight-laced building commissioner only to have him find out her true identity, is filled with male characters that form a fraternity of wickedness around her. Despite the title chanteuse’s swaggering bluster and confidence, she has no agency at all. The men, fueled by the power of money, view her as little more than a commodity. When the small amount of power she accrues is stripped in a devastating scene where wealthy proprietors of the club where she works invite the land commissioner there in order to embarrass him, she flings her body around the stage and into the audience, continuing with the show as she suffers from her own humiliation. In the process, her movement into madness is the realization that her reality is locked in place. She will always be bought and sold. What complicates this narrative is Fassbinder’s visual rendering of what, in the hands of another filmmaker, might be a flagrant tragedy. “Lola” is played out in a dreamlike alternate universe, technically set in the past but emboldened by a bright swirl of expressive colors, like the world of a MGM musical. The traditional visual codes for this kind of narrative are absent, which gums up the audience’s desire for empathy. We want to feel bad for the main character, but we’re not sure we’re supposed to. Fassbinder is refusing to steer us in a specific direction. A similar tactic is used in “Veronika Voss” (November 15, 18), one of Fassbinder’s best films, especially of his late period. This time, the film is devoid of color. In a nod to Billy Wilder’s “Sunset Blvd,” Fassbinder sets his story of a sportswriter’s growing fascination with an aging actress in a stark and hazy world of black-and-white. Here, the main character’s madness is more explicit, but it’s framed visually as something closer to a horror movie. She’s drained of feeling, suffering under the power of a manipulative doctor, but presented as a monster. Is the title character truly a tragic figure? It’s not clear. Everything that happens is presented in this world where fact and fiction — here, the dream factory of moviemaking — are blurred. The question lingers: Are what we’re witnessing the nightmares of a stilted actress or the fantasies of a man obsessed? “Voss” and “Lola” use extreme visual palates to complicate the traditional dualities of tragedy. The main characters in both films are constantly teetering on the line between rationality and madness, and the trajectory from one to the other is neither smooth nor obvious. How we’re supposed to read these characters, and everything that happens to them, is puzzling. Fassbinder refuses to land on one certainty or the other. His female characters are constantly suffering, but their suffering is thrown into question by what we’re seeing on screen. To be sure, this is intentional and it’s what leads some to see Fassbinder as a sadistic filmmaker. His view of human relationships, especially marriage, mirrored his view of postwar Germany, which he believed was a nation rotten at its core and in denial of itself. This means the female characters are often at once shouldering the burden of the problem at the same time that they’re part of it. “Fear or Fear” (November 13, 16) then, is remarkable for how different it is in subtle ways from much of Fassbinder’s other work. The main character is a housewife suffering from a humdrum existence, but aside from a nagging mother-and-sister-in-law combo and a husband who’s more involved in his studies than his marriage, her life is uneventful. This is the problem. She’s bored by this normality, wants something more, and slowly begins to drift away under the influence of cognac and medication and long periods spent in front of the record player listening to Leonard Cohen and the Rolling Stones, ignoring her parental responsibilities. But what’s clear is that her descent into madness is only in the eyes of others. Her breakdowns are minor, and the film lacks the cruelty present in so much of Fassbinder’s other work. Visually, it’s subdued (especially in relation to the other two films mentioned here), and there is very little ambiguity in how we should feel. The result is a less nuanced portrait of a woman’s life but shines a light on the tenderness and sensitivity Fassbinder brought to his female characters, often distorted by the amount of punishment inflicted on them. Here, there is little working against our identification with the main character’s pain, nothing to complicate or muck up our sympathies.  Published: November 3, 2014 Read full article here

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