television as art by Milan Atanaskovic / www.atanaskovic.com
Get the button embed code!
only ArtTV site

News

« previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 ... next »

New York
03/12/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.daheshmuseum.org/Display: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: FiftiesLocation Phone: +1 212 759 0606Admissions: Adults: $10.00; Seniors 62+: $8.00; Students w/ID $6.00; Members & Children under 12: FreeCollections: 19th and 20th Century European artHas Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: Tuesday to Sunday 11AM to 6PM<br />1st Thursdays to 9PMlocation fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

New York
03/12/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: Display: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: Michigan AvenueLocation Phone: + 212 219 2344Admissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

Julia Wachtel at Cleveland Museum of Art, Transformer Station
03/12/2014
Artist: Julia Wachtel Venue: Cleveland Museum of Art, Transformer Station Exhibition Title:  Date: October 11, 2014 – January 17, 2015 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: Images courtesy of Cleveland Museum of Art. Photos by David Brichford. Press Release: Rising to prominence in the early 1980s, Julia […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Untitled Art Fair Miami Beach 2014
03/12/2014
This video provides you with a walkthrough of Untitled Art Fair in Miami Beach 2014 on the occasion of the ... Read full article here

Thomas Eggerer at Richard Telles
02/12/2014
Artist: Thomas Eggerer Venue: Richard Telles, Los Angeles Date: November 1 – December 20, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: Images courtesy of Richard Telles, Los Angeles Press Release: Although Thomas Eggerer’s massive painting “Heavy Harvest” draws upon the multiple figure compositions of Pieter […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Christian Herman Cummings, Miriam Hanks-Todd at Michael Benevento
02/12/2014
  Artists: Christian Herman Cummings, Miriam Hanks-Todd Venue: Michael Benevento, Los Angeles Exhibition Title: Multiple Inversions in Multiple Versions Date: November 8 – December 20, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: Images courtesy of the artists and Michael Benevento, Los Angeles Press Release: “Calling his art […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Dealers Dish on Design Miami
02/12/2014
For its 10th anniversary, Design Miami, which runs December 3-7, is pulling out all the stops. Under the guidance of new director Rodman Primack, the most respected collectible furniture fair in the world returns to its namesake city with a host of new features, new dealers, and returning gallerists. Among the most exciting updated features is the VIP lounge, which has been designed by an architect for the first time this year. Olson Kundig of Seattle, Washington, sourced 38 wooden beams from a building slated for demolition in Los Angeles, transported them to Florida, and assembled them into an interlocking pavilion that will be used for lounge space and fair-related events. The architects have invited a coterie of other brands from the Pacific Northwest to join them in decorating the Miami pavilion, including Seattle-based clothier Totokaelo. In anticipation of the fair, ARTINFO spoke with some of our favorite dealers about what they’ll be bringing to Miami, what they’re excited about in this year’s edition, and what really separates their wares from those nearby at Art Basel. Southern GuildTrevyn McGowan, Founder and Co-OwnerCape Town, South Africa “This is our second time showing in Miami, and we’ve shown in Basel several times. The first year was a solo show on Gregor Jenkin. This year it’s a group show. We’re bringing work by Andile Dyalvane — the ‘Docks Table’ — that’s a piece that’s just been accepted by the Vitra Design Museum for their Africa show. It represents the artist’s views when [looking] down over the Cape Town Harbor. Each of these blocks can be assembled, and you can build your own industrial landscape. Something else that we’re very pleased to show is ‘Welcome to my World’ — that’s a life-size bronze gorilla drinks cabinet. The core of the gorilla opens up and there’s a miniature gorilla inside. It’s a very powerful piece — the second edition of five — and it’s very symbolic for us of the work we’re doing with Southern Guild. Bronze Age are some of the most talented artisans working in South Africa at the moment. It’s a very humorous piece and it’s also quite moving.   Our display this year will be quite raw and quite potent in expressing our identity. The more we exhibit internationally the more I feel confident that we’ve come to show our viewpoint on collectible design.” Carpenters Workshop GalleryLoic Le Gaillard, Founder and Co-OwnerLondon / Paris “Big fairs like these are an interesting way to approach an entire body of work so that people can see it in a very curatorial way. We’re coming this year with Studio Job, which I think is really interesting because Studio Job are really at the border between design and contemporary art — and it’s up to the collector to decide in which category he is. My mission is to make sure, actually, that there are no borders between art and design. Job has been working the past five years on a series called the ‘Landmarks,’ of some very important architectural landmarks — so like the Eiffel Tower, the Taj Mahal, Big Ben in London, the Burj Khalifa in Dubai. When you look at the craftsmanship of the pieces, it’s just absolutely surreal. Nobody is working with this level of detail. I really think that Studio Job is one of the most matured, important artists of this generation. People will discover something that is absolutely phenomenal. They’re going to like it, or not like it — but it will be absolutely impossible to keep them neutral. There’s one which is called ‘Big Ben (Aftermath)’ — the clock of Big Ben lying on a space that has been almost crunched by erosion. One of the most famous landmarks in England, in a society going completely crazy, it’s just one of the societies of the world that is struggling to deal with the insanity of today. Then there’s Taj Mahal, which is upside down, because it was really the palace for love. It’s upside down because love makes you go crazy. I think it’s a very beautiful metaphor. And we’re used to seeing its reflection upside down in the water. And there’s the Eiffel Tower, which is bending, and it’s a little bit about France losing its status as the cultural capital of the world. The Tower is bending out of exertion — it has to carry the weight of France.” R & CompanyZesty Meyers, Founder and Co-OwnerNew York “We’re going to launch a collection of four rugs, two from David Wiseman and two from the Haas Brothers. We had them made in Kathmandu, and they’re amazingly done. They’re 12 feet in diameter for the Haas because they’re round, and David’s are 12 feet square. They’re large and really personal — David’s rug, for example, has about four million knots in it and takes months and months to make. They tell stories, they take design to another level, and it is an artwork that is usable. They’ll be hung like tapestries at the fair because we can’t have people walking on them, but they’re really meant to be used. The Haas will also be showing some new marble pieces that are carved — stools and a series called ‘Jabawalkers.’ They will show Hex stools as well, and the accretion ceramics, of course. We will also show their mini beasts. We will also introduce, for the first time ever at the fair, a young man named Thaddeus Wolfe. He makes pieces out of glass that start as sculpture that he casts the mold around, then he destroys the sculpture and he blows glass into the mold, and he starts to take away layers once it comes out of the kiln to reveal a pendant-like sculpture. We’ve been working with him for like two years now. For the first time ever, we’re going to show the work of Lina Bo Bardi. We’ll be showing her next to Greta Grossman. Next to that will be Joaquim Tenreiro. We’re also showing, also for the first time ever, a bit of our collection of radical Italian design from the late ’60s and early ’70s. Started as conceptual art to be used, and ended up as design. I think what’s really happening, particularly on the contemporary level, is that it really crosses the boundaries. Most of what we sell goes to the people who collect art. It’s such a huge blurring of the boundaries that it makes you wonder what the separation is at all?” Gallery ALLXiao Lu, Managing PartnerLos Angeles / Beijing “This year, Design Miami opened the Curio section, so we applied to that section and got accepted. The theme this year is to present very interesting installations that challenge the common design narratives, and I think Naihan Li’s ‘I Am a Monument’ collection is one of the most interesting that we are developing at the moment and quite fits into the theme of the section. We’re showing just one piece in the Curio section, a cabinet in the form of the CCTV Building in Beijing. We want to premiere it at the fair — it’s never been shown. The other pieces in the collection were shown in the Beijing space at the end of September. The space limit at the Curio section means that it’s not possible to show a lot of pieces anyway, so we want to bring the most extraordinary piece, the CCTV piece. It’s made of Brazilian rosewood. We think the collection is very artistic. Naihan’s previous pieces at the gallery — for example, the Crates series — were very functional. So the designer wanted to challenge herself to make more artistic work. She has been planning to do this collection for two years, and now is the perfect time for pieces from the collection to start coming out.” Dealers Dish on Design MiamiSelect Photo Gallery: Slideshow: Preview Works from Design Miami 2014Published: December 2, 2014 Read full article here

Gift Guide 2014: For the Connoisseur's Coffee Table
02/12/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Tags: BLOUIN Lifestyle PickAuthor(s): Sonia Kolesnikov-JessopSub-Channels: AccessoriesShort Title : Gift Guide: For the Connoisseur's Coffee Tabl Read full article here

Highlights from "Sculptors' Jewelry"
02/12/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Michelle TaySub-Channels: Jewelry & WatchesShort Title : Highlights from "Sculptors' Jewelry" Read full article here

When Robert Altman Took a Step Back From the Crowd
01/12/2014
When Robert Altman Took a Step Back From the CrowdAt the Cannes Film Festival in 1992, Robert Altman was in a typically bad mood. During an outspoken interview with members of the press, the director took a series of verbal shots at the Dutch television producer Ludi Boeken, allegedly calling him a “thief, liar, and pimp.” The two had worked together two years earlier on “Vincent & Theo,” a conventional biopic of the Van Gogh brothers that sparked little critical or commercial interest. A month after his comments showed up in the trade papers, Boeken sued Altman for slander, seeking damages of over $800 million. It was a fitting burnout to a decade rife with professional disasters for Altman, whose work will be shown in a retrospective at MoMA December 3 through January 17. The director had built up a reputation a decade prior as a challenging personality making equally challenging pictures inside the studio system. Following the critical swelling around “M*A*S*H” (1970) — most of it from the pen of New Yorker film critic Pauline Kael — he emerged as a progenitor of the New Hollywood, along with directors such as Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola, producing a string of idiosyncratic pictures throughout the ’70s that defied a clear unifying logic — the snowy Western “McCabe and Mrs. Miller,” the laconic Raymond Chandler adaptation “The Long Goodbye,” the satirical odyssey “Nashville,” and the hypnotically-paced “3 Women” were all made within a few years of each other. He capped the decade with 13 films, which means he essentially never stopped working. Then “Popeye” (1980) happened. Altman’s musical based on the comic strips of E. C. Segar (as opposed to the subsequent cartoons by Max Fleischer) is certainly one of the more bizarre films in his career and because of that one of his most fascinating. According to the cartoonist and screenwriter Jules Feiffer, as told to Mitchell Zuckoff in his oral biography of Altman, the movie had its origins in a petty grievance. The producer Robert Evans was upset that he lost the rights to make “Annie” into a musical motion picture, so he went looking for another comic strip to adapt, finally realizing that Paramount happened to own the rights to the character of Popeye. Dustin Hoffmann was originally attached to star, and a slew of directors — Hal Ashby, Louis Malle, Jerry Lewis — were considered to take on the film but ultimately passed. Altman, ever the one to defy expectations, signed a contract to make the picture. According to various reports, the making of the movie was a disaster. Altman insisted on shooting the film in Malta, reportedly to get as far away from the studio heads as possible. There are multiple accounts of an open bar being set up during the viewing of dailies. One of the crew members fell four floors and remarkably survived. The budget moved from $13 million to $20 million. It earned an international total of $60 million, which means it was more financially successful than John Huston’s version of “Annie” (1982), but due to bloated predictions from the business end and the dissemination of backstage drama in the press, the film was deemed a failure. It would take Altman over a decade to recover. But the lost period of his long career, essentially the span between “Popeye” and the release of “The Player” (1992), deserves more attention. Altman had trouble raising money for a film, and producers didn’t want to work with him because of his increasing petulance and reputation for calling them out in the press when things didn’t work out to his liking. This meant that the filmmaker known for increasing inflation of narrative simply for the sake of it —“A Wedding” (1978) had 48 characters, which was exactly double the 24 characters in “Nashville” — had to scale back. Altman followed his biggest picture with one of his smallest. “Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean,” was based on a play written by Ed Graczyk, which Altman had directed on Broadway before turning it into a movie. A group of women — played by Sandy Dennis, Cher, Karen Black, Sudie Bond, and Kathy Bates — reconvene in an old Woolworth’s store they used to spend time at as teenagers as members of a James Dean fan club. The entire film takes place in one room, making it essentially not much different than the play. But on screen the intimacy of these characters is more deeply felt outside the distance of the stage. With little commercial success, Altman focused his attention on plays. Over the next few years he would film David Rabe’s “Streamers” (1983), Donald Freed’s startlingly minimalist “Secret Honor” (1984), Sam Shepard’s “Fool for Love” (1985), and Christopher Durang’s “Beyond Therapy” (1987). Made for little money, they are often forgotten or completely ignored in critical revaluations. But they contradict a major myth concerning Altman; mainly that he didn’t care about actors. These are films that are all about the performances — there’s often little else on screen — and there seems to be an attempt on Altman’s part to capture the immediacy of the stage combined with the emotional ambiguity of film through camera work. So a scene in a play that’s dramatic intent is bald-faced, often needed in the theater because of its unique relationship with the audience, is complicated by Altman zooming into a small detail in the corner of the frame. It takes the exactitude of theatrical convention, where there is little room for uncertainty, and mucks it up. With the success of “The Player,” Altman would go back to his early days of voluminous works that often seemed so simply for the sake of it. There are a few interesting pictures during the final part of his career — especially his final film, “A Prairie Home Companion” (2006), more emotional in the wake of his death — but ultimately he had become a legacy director whose new work was praised because of the career that came before it. For a director who is routinely championed for what he brought that was new to the cinema, it’s only correct that we shine a light on the true innovations that are hiding in the shadows. Published: December 1, 2014 Read full article here

« previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 ... next »

Welcome to Art Television

New member
Sign up

Already a member
Log in



Museums / Institutions

Exhibitions / Events