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“Guyton Price Smith Walker” at Plymouth Rock
12/07/2014
  Artists: Mathis Altmann, Vittorio Brodmann, Gina Folly, Thomas Julier, Tobias Kaspar, Emil Michael Klein, Tobias Madison, Emanuel Rossetti, Thomas Sauter, Hannah Weinberger Venue: Plymouth Rock, Zurich Exhibition Title: Guyton Price Smith Walker Date: June 8 –­ July 12, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of video, images, press release and link available after the jump. Videos: […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Group Show at Halle Für Kunst Lüneberg
12/07/2014
Artists: Merlin Carpenter, Nicolas Ceccaldi, Jana Euler, Monika Jarecka, Tobias Kaspar, Dirk Meinzer, Buffy Summers, Jan Timme, Amelie von Wulffen Venue: Halle Für Kunst Lüneberg Exhibition Title: Coming of Age For Ages Date: May 17 – June 22, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

VIDEO: Highlights From Art Market Hamptons 2014
12/07/2014
VIDEO: Highlights From Art Market Hamptons 2014BRIDGEHAMPTON, NY — It’s all about having fun at Art Market Hamptons. The Brooklyn-based art fair returns to the Bridgehampton Historical Society for its fourth season, boasting a boutique selection of 40 modern and contemporary galleries, while throwing in a little Brooklyn flair with a summer soiree of food truck vendors like Red Hook Lobster Pound and jazz performances curated by Manhattan’s members-only club, Norwood. Highlights from this year’s fair include Manhattan-based FREIGHT + VOLUME, who brought artists RÖMER + RÖMER and Damian Stamer, and East Hampton’s Eric Firestone Gallery, showcasing works by BÄST and Henry Chalfant. Returning galleries like Galerie Mourlot also brought in exquisite blue chip works by Pablo Picasso and Adolph Gottlieb. Read more about Hamptons Art Week HERE. Art Market Hamptons is open now until July 13 at Bridgehampton Historical Society, 2368 Montauk Hwy, Bridgehampton, NY.   Published: July 11, 2014 Read full article here

Ben Kinmont at Air de Paris
11/07/2014
Artist: Ben Kinmont Venue: Air de Paris, Paris Exhibition Title: Sometimes you must close a door to enter another room Date: May 24 – July 18, 2014 Note: A digital version of the On becoming something else archive is available here. Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: Images courtesy […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Week in Review: From Saville to Beavers, Our Top Visual Arts Stories
11/07/2014
Week in Review: From Saville to Beavers, Our Top Visual Arts Stories— Scott Indrisek rounded up 10 must-see summer group shows.— Martin Gayford reviewed Jenny Saville’s sensual Gagosian exhibition in London.— Amanda Coulson — director of the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas and the VOLTA art fair — talked about curating and Caribbean stereotypes.— Scott Indrisek profiled painter Gina Beavers, who uses social media as inspiration.— Ashton Cooper took a look at the 3 Hamptons fairs bringing art to the beach this month and Art+Auction put together a calendar of Hamptons events.— Martin Gayford covered “The Human Factor” at the Hayward Gallery.— Hannah Stamler reviewed Louise Lawler at Metro Pictures and Rachel Adams reviewed Dinh Q. Lê at Rice University Art Gallery — both in the September issue of Modern Painters.— Anna Kats talked to architecture curator Joanna Warsza about curating between East and West.— Scott Indrisek’s Studio Tracks series featured a playlist from artist duo Faile.This Week's VIDEOS: brightcove.createExperiences();  Published: July 11, 2014 Read full article here

Group Show at Crevecoeur
11/07/2014
Artists: Julien Carreyn, Than Hussein Clark, Jochen Dehn, Maurizio Galante & Tal Lancman, Samara Golden, Jason Matthew Lee, Shana Moulton, Cindy Sherman Venue: Crevecoeur, Paris Exhibition Title: There is nothing personal of yours to exhibit Date: May 23 – July 19, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of video, images, press release and link available after the […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

Inside the Venet Foundation
11/07/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Benjamin ParkShort Title : Inside the Venet Foundation Read full article here

On Kawara Dead at 81, “Diana” Statue Returns to Philadelphia, and More
11/07/2014
On Kawara Dead at 81, “Diana” Statue Returns to Philadelphia, and More— On Kawara Dead at 81: Japanese-born conceptual artist On Kawara died yesterday at 81. News first came by way of Frieze Magazine’s Twitter account, and was confirmed with an announcement by David Zwirner Gallery on its website. The artist was internationally known for his meticulous date paintings that chronicled each day of his life, and a large-scale retrospective of his work is planned to open at the Guggenheim on February 8, 2015. [David Zwirner Gallery] — “Diana” Returns to Philadelphia: The Philadelphia Museum of Art’s iconic statue “Diana” has returned after a yearlong restoration process to regild the artwork. The statue’s green copper body has been exposed for 80 years until a gift of $200,000 from Bank of America gave the museum the funds they needed for the project. Once again overlooking the Great Stair Hall, the statue has a new, more muted golden coat that is similar — but not identical — to the shiny plating that originally covered in it 1893. [Philly.com] — National Gallery Names Modern Art Curator: Lynne Cooke has been named senior curator of special projects for the National Gallery of Art, beginning next month. Cooke previously served as a professor at the NGA’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, deputy director and chief curator at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, and a curator at the Dia Art Foundation. While at the NGA, she has been working to organize an exhibition about the relationship between formally taught and self-taught artists in the US during the 20th and 21st centuries. [WashPo] — Elon Musk Gives $1 Million to Tesla Museum: A tweet from cartoonist Matthew Inman, who has led a fundraising campaign for the Tesla Science Center, to Elon Musk, the CEO of Tesla Motors, prompted the billionaire to pledge $1 million to the new museum. [TIME] — Iraq’s Antiquities in Danger: Christopher Dickey of the Daily Beast spoke to NPR about how the current crisis with ISIS in Iraq is affecting museum antiquities and archaeological sites in the country. [NPR] — Sotheby’s to Sell World Famous Watch: Sotheby’s plans to sell the Henry Graves Supercomplication, the most famous and complicated watch in the world, in Geneva on November 14. [Art Daily] — An audit of 1,218 museums by the French government has revealed many are in danger from improper storage and inadequate protection from theft. [Hyperallergic] — The Victoria and Albert Museum has launched a campaign to raise £5 million to buy four bronze angels whose history is tied to Henry VIII and Cardinal Thomas Wolsey. [Guardian] — Instagram is proving a real player in online art selling. [Vogue] ALSO ON ARTINFO Biopic: Douglas Coupland Nat Hentoff, Still Gloriously Out Of Step ZieherSmith and Horton Gallery To Merge By September Check our blog IN THE AIR for breaking news throughout the day. Published: July 11, 2014 Read full article here

Introducing Artist Eli Keszler
11/07/2014
Introducing Artist Eli Keszler“To call it an instrument is, in a sense, utopian, a fantastic thing,” says Eli Keszler, describing the massive outdoor installation he was creating in Katonah, New York, for the Caramoor Center for Music and Arts’s sound-art festival this summer. A fragment of one of these outsize works-in-progress that was in his Gowanus, Brooklyn, studio is an austere-looking contraption: a series of mechanical metal beaters mounted atop black platforms that anchor taut lengths of piano wire reaching to the ceiling. When powered up, the beaters activate according to a preprogrammed score, producing a clattering array of rich, industrial tones as they make contact with the wire. The final work for Caramoor involves similar mechanisms mounted on trees, the wire reaching, Keszler claims, perhaps as far as a mile. “The idea of pushing something so far that it turns into something else is interesting to me,” he says. The Caramoor installation, which opened last month, is his largest undertaking yet—no small feat, considering that a project last summer involved 850-foot stretches of wire affixed to the Manhattan Bridge. These installations perform autonomously but also serve as sites at which Keszler and fellow musicians can perform, their strange mechanized syncopation adding another live voice to the ensemble. Keszler trained as a percussionist at the New England Conservatory. Driven in part by exposure to the noise and experimental scene in Boston, he found himself pulling away from a more conservative, composition-based approach to music. “I wanted to push away from that temporal world, turn to something more energy-oriented, and something that had this internal clash with its own timing,” he says. “Initially, I thought that installation would frame the composition and add this antisocial element to the music. If you try to craft a narrative or
a structure that has a satisfying musical feeling, sometimes the installation just destroys what you’re trying to do. It’s
a difficult experience to perform, but you end up breaking away from patterns.” Keszler’s own drumming toes a thin line between the tightly controlled and the entropic. (In addition to performances within his installations, he’s played extensively as a solo artist and in collaboration with the likes of Ashley Paul, C. Spencer Yeh, Loren Connors, and the Icelandic Symphony Orchestra, and has released recordings with labels including Berlin’s PAN, Burlington, Vermont’s NNA Tapes, and his own REL records). On the 2010 composition Oxtirn, for example, he
plays quickly, creating a frenetic wash
of clattering sound that’s contrasted with an overlaid metallic drone, stretching
the energy of the composition in another direction altogether. “In my drumming, the constant thing has been the idea
of layering so many hits, so many sounds, that it turns into a mess,” Keszler explains. “Oftentimes, musically I find myself attracted to things that are so slow
they seem fast and so fast they seem slow—when you have so many hits that they eventually turn into a long tone.” This sense of percussive density provides a point of entry to the third part of Keszler’s practice: his drawings, which, he says, are “really intuitive—they
come from this compulsive space, from energy and a need to release.” Reproductions of a handful of these works on paper were published in
the artist book Neum, to accompany an installation of the same name at the South London Gallery in June 2013. L-Set, an ink, acrylic, and enamel on paper work, is an abstract mass of light lines, organic in their interlaced sprawl. Shading gives the mass dimension as well as a topographical feel; atop the wild density formed by these lines are inelegant, opaque strikes of black and yellow, recalling the tension in Oxtirn between Keszler’s lightning-fast drumming and the singular drones. Other drawings
have the appearance of warped blueprints or musical scores, two-dimensional renderings, it seems, of the physical and sonic architecture Keszler employs elsewhere in his practice. But while he does draw from the
aerial blueprints of spaces in which he’s constructing sound installations, he’s quick to dispel the notion that his ink drawings serve as preliminary sketches
for performances. Rather, he describes a sort of triangulation of conflicts, among installation, drawing, and music, between the visual and the aural. “The idea is
not to center my practice around the installation but to go through different worlds,” he says. “The drawing, in a
way, is solving the conflict I have with installation and music—not just thinking about sound.” Still, it demonstrates a step in how Keszler considers space, which is certainly significant to his practice, on both a practical and a conceptual level. His installations respond to architecture in a specific way, incorporating the acoustics and unique interior structure
of a space, whether it’s the interior of a gallery like South London or Eyebeam
or, more ambitiously, a construction like the Manhattan Bridge. His project for Caramoor is the first time he actually builds his own architectural framework
in an otherwise open space. “I’ve always used buildings, and this piece is going to be in a very pristine natural environment,” he says. “I’ve had to think about it in different terms, but that contrast is really interesting to me: how you build these structures in an environment, and how they accent parts of the environment
that maybe we just take for granted, or treat as a given. You don’t think about how industrial these materials are until they’re placed on top of outdoor land.” What Keszler proposes is, maybe, a different kind of architecture—one that’s “less conceptual than psychological,”
by his description: “The installation turns into something that has to do more with people than ideas—it’s really difficult
to re-create chaos with a sort of theoretical detachment. Musically, I’m inspired by construction sites and the chaos of cities, as well as nature. To try and directly re-create that through sound is almost always a real failure, but I’m inspired
by those structures.” What results is a social space not locked fully into the codes and practices of the often insular art
or experimental music worlds, one whose sounds can be harsh but, through their dissonance, open up something new. His recollection of reactions to his brief Manhattan Bridge project brings to mind Richard Serra’s disruptive (and ultimately dismantled) 1981 public sculpture Tilted Arc: “You have random people walking
by, and you’re basically intruding in their space,” Keszler surmises. “Especially
with sound—it’s cathartic, and the sounds I make are really intense. People are confused, and they don’t know what’s going on. Maybe they’re just trying
to go to work. That’s really exciting to me—even if they hate it—because you’re breaking up the rhythm of people’s
lives. That’s a healthy thing to do.” A version of this article appears in the May 2014 issue of Modern Painters magazine.  Published: July 11, 2014 Read full article here

He An at Daniel Templon
11/07/2014
Artist: He An Venue: Daniel Templon, Brussels Exhibition Title: Wind Light as a Thief Date: June 6 – July 19, 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: Images courtesy of Galerie Daniel Templon, Paris & Brussels Press Release: Galerie Templon is showing a series of neon installations by […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

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