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Poland Questions Provenance of Austria’s $77M Bruegel, Berlin to Host Works From Tehran’s Museum of Contemporary Art, and More
23/10/2015
Poland Questions Provenance of Austria’s $77M Bruegel, Berlin to Host Works From Tehran’s Museum of Contemporary Art, and More— Poland Questions Provenance of Austria’s $77 Million Bruegel: Allegations have surfaced in Krakow, Poland that the 1559 Bruegel painting “The Fight Between Carnival and Lent,” which currently hangs in the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna, was looted from Poland during World War II. Archival documents discovered by the director of the National Museum in Krakow tell that the wife of the city’s Nazi-era governor took several paintings from the Polish museum when she relocated back to Austria in 1942 — the Bruegel among them. Speaking to the significance of this discovery, Meredith Hale, a fellow in Netherlandish art at Cambridge, noted: “It is impossible to overstate the importance of this painting. If it was taken unlawfully from Krakow to Vienna it would be a huge story for the art world — as big as it gets.” [FT, Artnet] — Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art to Loan Works in First Post-Thaw Deal: A major loan of 20th-century art acquired by the Shah’s regime in the 1970s has been negotiated for an exhibition by the State Museums Berlin and the Prussian Cultural Foundation next year. The collection, thought by some to be the finest of its period outside the West, includes works by Francis Bacon, Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock, and Claude Monet, but the details of the new loan remain unknown. Though works from the Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art collection have been put on loan before, this is the first such deal since what has been termed the “Iranian thaw” — or nuclear agreement — came earlier this year. [TAN] — Thomas Jefferson Statue Provokes Ire at Missouri University: A monument to founding father Thomas Jefferson at the University of Missouri in Columbia has incited aggressive debate on campus, with many students and social media commentators piqued that Jefferson, a slave owner, should have a memorial devoted to him at all. An online petition demands that the statue be removed from the university’s central quad area, while supporters of the Twitter hashtag #standwithJefferson have been making the opposite case. The university Republicans are blaming the row on an excess of political correctness and reminding observers of the “important moral and political” values that Jefferson stood for. [LAT] — Swizz Beatz Joins Brooklyn Museum Board: Kasseem Dean (a.k.a. Swizz Beatz) and Barbara Vogelstein have joined the Brooklyn Museum’s “growing” board, the institution stated in a release last night. The board appointments, which bring the museum’s governing body to 33 members, are the first since Anne Pasternak assumed her directorship of the Brooklyn Museum on September 1. [Brooklyn Museum] — Loic Gouzer Named Deputy Chairman of Post-War and Contemporary at Christie’s: The Swiss-born Christie’s executive has been promoted from senior vice president, though he told ARTnews he is “not really impressed by people’s titles.” Artworks’ titles, on the other hand, will do just fine: Gouzer was responsible for the record-setting $706 million “Looking Forward to the Past” sale at the auction house last May. [ARTnews] — Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art Appoints CEO: Curator, writer, and administrator Chantal Pontbriand has joined the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art in Toronto as CEO, a newly created position. Pontbriand has previously served as the commissioner of the Canadian pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 1990, among other appointments. [Globe and Mail] — The Guardian offers a quiz on the architectural eccentricities of higher education institutions: how many Brutalist blocs and sculptural towers can you recognize? [Guardian] — Carolina Miranda combs through the Yelp reviews for L.A.’s new Broad Art Museum and finds mixed reactions: “Much anger” over the long line for a 45-second appointment at Yayoi Kusama’s infinity room, but also general sentiments to the end of “ahhh-mazing.” [LAT] — The 2015 W. Eugene Smith Grant has been awarded to photographer Matt Black, for documenting the rural poverty of California’s farming communities. [Artforum] Published: October 23, 2015 Read full article here

Elmgreen and Dragset’s Poetic “Selfies” at Victoria Miro London
23/10/2015
Elmgreen and Dragset’s Poetic “Selfies” at Victoria Miro LondonThe London and Berlin based, Danish-Norwegian collaborative art duo Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset, aka Elmgreen & Dragset, continue their ongoing interrogation of the conventions of public institutions in their third solo exhibition at Victoria Miro, which is on show at the gallery’s Mayfair, London space until November 7. Titled “Self-Portraits,” the exhibition features a new series of works comprising representations of museum wall labels of other artists’ works including David Hockney, Ross Bleckner, Roni Horn, Martin Kippenberger, and Nicole Eisenmann, among others, which the artist duo have appropriated and transformed into works of art in their own right. The duo explains: “It is a response to the projections put upon one from other people, as well as one’s urge to project a fuller, richer image of one’s self. But in order to obtain this, one is dependent on using signs and codes with connotations that are common, or else they will not be able to recognise the attempted image of one’s self.” “Today, endless self-portraiture in the form of ‘selfies’ – each one following conventions resulting ultimately in images which are similar in appearance – makes it clearer than ever that a self-portrait does not reveal the ‘true nature of one’s inner self’. A self-portrait will always be a reflection of how one sees one’s self and wants to stage one’s appearance in relation to the surrounding world. To find out more about “Self-Portraits,” BLOUIN ARTINFO caught up with the duo and asked them a few questions. Self-Portraits at Victoria Miro Mayfair features a new series of works that are representations of museum wall labels of other artists’ works. What was the inspiration and motivation behind this new series? We’ve been working together as an artist duo since 1995, which makes this year our 20th anniversary, and so recently we’ve been reflecting on the past two decades, our creative process, our dialogues over these many years, our sources of inspiration, etc. We decided to make a show that was about our shared history. The titles depicted on these wall label works each reveal something that has been important to us: an event, a situation, a moment, or a conversation between us. Our work arises from our ongoing dialogues and when read together, the titles of the labels interact with each other and form a kind of poetry. The works of all the artists referenced in the labels have been influential to us, some personally, some professionally, throughout the years. The funny thing is that we were never big fans ourselves of having labels next to our works when we’ve done museums shows in the past—we always tried to avoid them since we thought they were distracting. However, the labels isolated without the works next to them function in quite an intriguing way, we think. What is the significance of the title of the show, “Self-Portraits,” and what does it reveal about the new series? Well, a “Self-Portrait” of two artists working together is somewhat impossible—how could we write an autobiography, as we are two different people? We wanted to make a series of “Self-Portraits” that showed some of the things we share, and by exploring this sort of imaginary third persona that has developed between us, through our collaboration. The title also points to a potential alternative to the current all-consuming “selfie” culture. It seems like any beautiful landscape, any prominent landmark or significant event, has been reduced to only a faded background all over social media for people to pose in front of with their smiling faces. This trend unsettles us—since it is as if the world does not exist unless you yourself are placed as the ultimate center point—and it made us want to suggest another, quieter way to display one’s self, and to speak about what can constitute an identity today. Where does “Self-Portraits” sit in the context of your wider practice and how does it relate to your previous works? Many of our works investigate the conventions of public institutions, not only art institutions. With these projects we often emphasize the seemingly insignificant elements of each spatial setting, be it a wall label in a museum, another kind of signage, or a security guard, in order to get people thinking about these features from a different perspective. This investigation into institutional spaces started with our performance “12 Hours of White Paint” in 1997, where we added about 160 liters of white paint to the walls of a white cube gallery. The space seemed to dissolve, just by adding more layers of its basic make-up. At the Serpentine Gallery we filled an otherwise empty room with guards dressed in uniforms, just sitting there on chairs all along the walls, staring at you as an audience when you entered. We have also made works dealing with donation boxes, VIP lounges, and flip boards normally used for advertisements, as well as the works that deal with how airports, prisons and hospitals are organised. At what point, and because of what factors and characteristics, do the labels become works of art in their own right? Usually artwork wall labels are printed on disposable materials, and they exist solely to communicate details about the corresponding work: the title, year, materials, dimensions, courtesy, etc. Our labels are instead rendered in time-honored materials that have endured throughout art history: paint on canvas, engraved marble and charcoal on paper, and their sizes have been altered. They morph from typical, unobtrusive museum labels and become artworks themselves through our formal transformation and our added conceptual layers. The conscious act of appropriation has been a core practice for many artists before us who were preoccupied with identity issues. Altogether it is about changing the perspective on an object, and adding a different set of values to it that allows for new readings. Select Photo Gallery: Elmgreen & Dragset “Self-Portraits” at Victoria Miro LondonPublished: October 23, 2015 Read full article here

Elmgreen & Dragset “Self-Portraits” at Victoria Miro London
23/10/2015
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Marina R. Vargas en el CACmálaga
23/10/2015
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Candace Lin at François Ghebaly
23/10/2015
Artist: Candace Lin Venue: François Ghebaly, Los Angeles Exhibition Title: You are a spacious fluid sac Date: September 12 – October 24, 2015 Note: A publication associated with the show can be downloaded here. Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump. Images: Images courtesy of François Ghebaly, Los Angeles Press Release: […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

25 artistas coleccionables: Fernanda Gomes
23/10/2015
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25 artistas coleccionables: Fernanda Gomes
23/10/2015
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Wirrel
23/10/2015
Language Undefined Location Website: Location Email: claire.rider@liverpoolmuseums.org.ukDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: PigalleLocation Phone: +44 151 478 4136Admissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

Major Exhibition on Frank Gehry Opens at 21_21 DESIGN SIGHT
23/10/2015
Major Exhibition on Frank Gehry Opens at 21_21 DESIGN SIGHTThis autumn, Tokyo's 21_21 DESIGN SIGHT museum is presenting a major exhibition on Frank Gehry's stunning, yet often controversial, ideas of architecture. "So you get an idea. A stupid idea, but you like it. So you look at it 'till you don't like it. So then you make another model, as another way of looking at the first stupid idea..." is how Frank Gehry begins his manifesto, a glorious, if somewhat tongue-in-cheek, exhortation of trial and error, of persistence with 'stupid ideas' beyond their obvious failure. How does it end? "Then the lord sends a messenger. He hypnotizes all the people, so they all like the idea." Ontario-born Frank Gehry has been called 'the most important architect of our time' by Vanity Fair. He is certainly one of the most controversial. His jagged, angular buildings that sometimes resemble crumpled heaps of aluminum regularly appear on the lists of top works of architecture of the last decades, even century. His 1998 Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, which put this Spanish post-industrial backwater on the map of the world, is not only regularly cited as one of the most, if not the most, important works of contemporary architecture. It also added a new term to the English language: the 'Bilbao effect', generally understood as the mechanism of urban renewal in which a single landmark cultural institution revives, by way of fame and tourism, the economy of an entire urban area. ("We are hoping for the 'Bilbao effect'," said the Jaroslav Bondar, City Architect of Szczecin, while accepting the EU Prize for Contemporary Architecture this year, and everyone understood his gentle joke.) Simultaneously, they have been called a waste of resources, gaudy and unnecessary, and, in the words of Hal Foster, an exercise in corporate branding. Gehry's architectural language is unmistakable, his ideas often uncompromisingly odd, and looking at the genesis of these ideas is the theme behind the major exhibition at 21_21 DESIGN SIGHT, directed by Tsuyoshi Tane, himself a notable architect. "Gehry's buildings are not based on overnight thoughts, cheap ideas, and spurs of the moment," says Tane. "Ideas are tested, built up and broken down, beaten and examined, bullied, and abandoned. Gehry believes in the toughest, most resilient ideas that survive the jealousies, temptations, and meddling of others." The exhibition "I Have an Idea" was born from of a meeting between Gehry and Tane, in which Gehry introduced Tane, in all seriousness, to his manifesto on stupid ideas. "It occurred to me," says Tane, "that I'd been given a view of the long, hard road of struggle that Gehry had travelled." The exhibition introduces Gehry's models – designs, redesigns and considerations of necessary technolog – as well as the genesis of his ideas, and their translation into realized pieces, all the while reflecting on the commitment and conviction of the architect. It looks into the birth of star buildings such as Bilbao Guggenheim, Walt Disney Concert Hall, Fondation Louis Vuitton, as well as what may be the origin of them all – Gehry Residence. The person of Frank Gehry, his inspiration, design processes, craftsmanship, and struggles – all will be explored in this unmissable exhibition. Architect Frank Gehry "I Have an Idea" runs October 16, 2015 through February 7, 2016 at 21_21 DESIGN SIGHT, Tokyo. Select Photo Gallery: Frank Gehry at 21_21 DESIGN SIGHTPublished: October 22, 2015 Read full article here

Jörg Plickat Wins $60,000 Macquarie Group Sculpture Prize for 2015
23/10/2015
Jörg Plickat Wins $60,000 Macquarie Group Sculpture Prize for 2015German sculptor Jörg Plickat has been announced the 2015 winner of the prestigious $60,000 Macquarie Group Sculpture Prize at the launch of the 19th annual Sculpture by the Sea exhibition at Sydney’s iconic Bondi beach. This year’s judging panel awarded Plickat the most generous sculpture prize in Australia for his large-scale geometric work “divided planet,” which is installed on the ridge at Marks Park. Constructed from corten steel, “divided planet” is a statement of lament. “Instead of together trying to solve the urgent problems like global warming and poverty, our planet is divided into political blocks wasting all their energy in stupid confrontations,” Plickat said in his artist’s statement. “It's a pity but our planet is divided into political fragments and we artists, we are missing general politics to solve the big problems. And that, I wanted to show in this work,” the artist explained in an interview with the ABC. Macquarie group will once again gift this year's winning sculpture for permanent public enjoyment at Headland Park, Georges Heights, overlooking Sydney Harbour, where it will join works by previous winners of the prize at the conclusion of the event. “Congratulations to Jörg on a magnificent piece,” said Founding Director of Sculpture by the Sea, David Handley, “Each time Jörg has exhibited at Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi his works have stood out. It is wonderful to see a German artist has receive the major award for the first time.” Sculpture by the Sea returns to the Bondi Beach to Tamarama Beach coastal walk in 2015 for its 19th edition, once again transforming the coastal walk into a 2km long temporary sculpture park featuring 107 sculptures by 39 artists from Australia and around the world. Jörg Plickat is a leading international sculptor who works predominantly in natural stone, bronze, and corten steel. He has participated in more than 350 exhibitions worldwide and created and installed more than 85 public sculptures across four continents. Sculpture by the sea is on show until November 8. More info here. Published: October 22, 2015 Read full article here

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