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Santa Fe
27/08/2015
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.zanebennettgallery.comLocation Email: zanebennett@aol.comDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: ChelseaMonday - Close: 12:00amTuesday - Open: 12:00amTuesday - Close: 12:00amWednesday - Open: 12:00amWednesday - Close: 12:00amThursday - Open: 12:00amThursday - Close: 12:00amFriday - Open: 12:00amFriday - Close: 12:00amLocation Phone: +1 505 982 8111Saturday - Open: 12:00amSaturday - Close: 12:00amSunday - Open: 12:00amSunday - Close: 12:00amMonday - Open: 12:00amHas Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: Monday - Saturday 10 am to 5 pmSunday Noon to 4pmor by appointmentLocation Logo: location fax: +1 505 982 8160Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

West 20th Street
27/08/2015
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.jackshainman.comFacebook Website: https://www.facebook.com/jackshainmangalleryTwitter Website: https://www.twitter.com/JackShainmanNY4SQR Website: https://foursquare.com/v/jack-shainman-gallery/457fe37ef964a520543f1fe3Location Email: info@jackshainman.comLast name: Jack Shainman GalleryEmail: info@jackshainman.comPhone: 212 645 1701Brief info:   Jack Shainman Gallery was incorporated in 1984. Its first location was in Washington DC. Soon after opening, the gallery relocated to New York City occupying a space in the East Village before moving to 560 Broadway in Soho and then to its current location at 513 West 20th Street in Chelsea in 1997.   The focus of the gallery, since its inception over 28 years ago, is to exhibit, represent, and champion artists from around the world, in particular artists from Africa, East Asia, and North America, by mounting major exhibitions of their work in the gallery, presenting artworks at important art fairs, securing museum exhibitions, and publishing major catalogues with full-color reproductions and scholarly essays on their artwork. Represented artists employ all mediums, with a tendency towards conceptual as well as politically and socially engaged artwork. The gallery presents approximately 15 exhibitions a year and participates in major art fairs including Art Basel, Art Basel Miami Beach, and The Armory Show. The gallery is a member of the Art Dealers Association of America.   Gallery artists have been included in many important exhibitions, such as Documenta (1992, 1997, 2002, 2007); The Venice Biennale (1990, 1995, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007); The Carnegie International (1989, 1999/2000); the Moscow Biennale (2005, 2009); The Gwangju Biennale (2000, 2004, 2008); The Havana Biennale (2009); The Johannesburg Biennale (2005); and the Whitney Biennale (1997, 2006). Gallery artists have been recognized with numerous awards including a Leonore Annenberg Fellowship, a Ford Foundation Grant, a Fulbright, a Guggenheim, a MacArthur, A Louis Comfort TIffany, a Joan Mitchell and the Golden Lion for lifetime achievement, and are represented in museum collections throughout the world and have been documented in countless publications, monographs, and films.Display: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: ChelseaMonday - Close: 12:00amTuesday - Open: 12:00amTuesday - Close: 12:00amWednesday - Open: 12:00amWednesday - Close: 12:00amThursday - Open: 12:00amThursday - Close: 12:00amFriday - Open: 12:00amFriday - Close: 12:00amLocation Phone: t +1 212 645 1701 Saturday - Open: 12:00amSaturday - Close: 12:00amSunday - Open: 12:00amSunday - Close: 12:00amMonday - Open: 12:00amHas Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: Tuesday - Saturday, 10am - 6pmlocation fax: f +1 212 645 8316 Location Region: US/CanadaGuide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: New York / Northeast Read full article here

West 20th Street
27/08/2015
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.jackshainman.comFacebook Website: https://www.facebook.com/jackshainmangalleryTwitter Website: https://www.twitter.com/JackShainmanNY4SQR Website: https://foursquare.com/v/jack-shainman-gallery/457fe37ef964a520543f1fe3Location Email: info@jackshainman.comLast name: Jack Shainman GalleryEmail: info@jackshainman.comPhone: 212 645 1701Brief info:   Jack Shainman Gallery was incorporated in 1984. Its first location was in Washington DC. Soon after opening, the gallery relocated to New York City occupying a space in the East Village before moving to 560 Broadway in Soho and then to its current location at 513 West 20th Street in Chelsea in 1997.   The focus of the gallery, since its inception over 28 years ago, is to exhibit, represent, and champion artists from around the world, in particular artists from Africa, East Asia, and North America, by mounting major exhibitions of their work in the gallery, presenting artworks at important art fairs, securing museum exhibitions, and publishing major catalogues with full-color reproductions and scholarly essays on their artwork. Represented artists employ all mediums, with a tendency towards conceptual as well as politically and socially engaged artwork. The gallery presents approximately 15 exhibitions a year and participates in major art fairs including Art Basel, Art Basel Miami Beach, and The Armory Show. The gallery is a member of the Art Dealers Association of America.   Gallery artists have been included in many important exhibitions, such as Documenta (1992, 1997, 2002, 2007); The Venice Biennale (1990, 1995, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007); The Carnegie International (1989, 1999/2000); the Moscow Biennale (2005, 2009); The Gwangju Biennale (2000, 2004, 2008); The Havana Biennale (2009); The Johannesburg Biennale (2005); and the Whitney Biennale (1997, 2006). Gallery artists have been recognized with numerous awards including a Leonore Annenberg Fellowship, a Ford Foundation Grant, a Fulbright, a Guggenheim, a MacArthur, A Louis Comfort TIffany, a Joan Mitchell and the Golden Lion for lifetime achievement, and are represented in museum collections throughout the world and have been documented in countless publications, monographs, and films.Display: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: ChelseaMonday - Close: 12:00amTuesday - Open: 12:00amTuesday - Close: 12:00amWednesday - Open: 12:00amWednesday - Close: 12:00amThursday - Open: 12:00amThursday - Close: 12:00amFriday - Open: 12:00amFriday - Close: 12:00amLocation Phone: t +1 212 645 1701 Saturday - Open: 12:00amSaturday - Close: 12:00amSunday - Open: 12:00amSunday - Close: 12:00amMonday - Open: 12:00amHas Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: Tuesday - Saturday, 10am - 6pmlocation fax: f +1 212 645 8316 Location Region: US/CanadaGuide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: New York / Northeast Read full article here

Ashmolean Announces Groundbreaking Venetian Old Master Drawing Exhibition
27/08/2015
Ashmolean Announces Groundbreaking Venetian Old Master Drawing ExhibitionOxford University’s Ashmolean Museum has announced a groundbreaking exhibition of Venetian art that aims to reinstate drawing as a key component of the practices of the Venetian Old Masters. Titled “Titian to Canaletto: Drawing in Venice,” the exhibition brings together a hundred drawings from the Uffizi, the Ashmolean, and the Christ Church Picture Gallery that highlight the significance of drawing as a concept and as a practice in the artistic life of Venice. According to the Ashmolean, the exhibition is based on new research that traces continuities in Venetian drawing over three centuries, from around 1500 to 1750, revealing the variety of purposes and techniques in drawing from artists such as Bellini, Titian, Tintoretto, Tiepolo, and Canaletto. In a parallel exhibition, celebrated contemporary British artist Jenny Saville will present new works on paper and canvas that respond to the Venetian Old Masters. Dr Catherine Whistler, Keeper of the Department of Western Art, Ashmolean Museum, and curator of the exhibition, said: “The beauty and visual impact of these drawings speak eloquently of the importance of drawing in Venice. We hope this exhibition will challenge traditional views of Venetian art and provoke new thinking on some of the greatest names in Italian art from the Renaissance to the eighteenth century.” Dr Alexander Sturgis, Director of the Ashmolean, said: “The Ashmolean is bringing to a close its year of drawings exhibitions with this landmark show. Titian to Canaletto includes some of the Ashmolean’s greatest treasures, brought together with examples from two of the world’s finest collections of Old Master drawings – that of the Uffizi and the Christ Church Picture Gallery. Many of the works in the exhibition have not been displayed in public since the 1950s.” “Titian to Canaletto: Drawing in Venice” and “Jenny Saville Drawing” are at the Ashmolean Museum from October 15, 2015 to January 10, 2016. Select Photo Gallery: Ashmolean’s Titian to Canaletto: Drawing in VenicePublished: August 26, 2015 Read full article here

Ashmolean’s Titian to Canaletto: Drawing in Venice
27/08/2015
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VTV Classics (r3): Sigmar Polke. A Retrospective / Museum Frieder Burda (2007)
27/08/2015
In 2007, Museum Frieder Burda in Baden-Baden (Germany) brought together 60 paintings and 114 works on paper for a retrospective ... Read full article here

S**t My Cats Read: Joshua Cohen’s “Book of Numbers”
27/08/2015
S**t My Cats Read: Joshua Cohen’s “Book of Numbers”S**t My Cats Read is a regular feature in which Uni and Chloe Zola Volcano — two erudite kittens from Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn — engage in dialogues with some of the sharpest minds of our times. Conversations are facilitated by their tireless helpmate, Scott Indrisek. Joshua Cohen is a proud generator of what human lit-critics like to call “doorstoppers,” which is a term used to describe books that are really heavy, both in physical and intellectual terms. “Witz,” from 2010, weighed in at 800 pages; his latest, “Book of Numbers,” clocks a solid 592. It’s the story of Joshua Cohen — founder of Tetration, a suspiciously Googlesque mega-company — and Joshua Cohen, a struggling fiction writer tapped to write his name-twin’s autobiography. Confused yet? Just wait until you get lost in these electrified prose-thickets, kittens! If you don’t like your novels cobbled together from disparate modes — interviews, typo-ridden blog entries penned by jilted spouses, TMI journals, bursts of cross-cultural erotica set in the United Arab Emirates — you might want to look elsewhere. But we can assure you that “Book of Numbers” — however odd and occasionally maddening it can be — is worth the time required to plow through its frustrating awesomeness. Mr. Cohen kindly took the time out of his prolific workday to answer our feline questions. UNI and CHLOE: “Book of Numbers” is big and unwieldy, both in its length and its structure, but by the end we get something close to a linear narrative, or at least a story that has, like, a beginning, a middle, and an end. As a fiction writer, how do you muddle these things — convention, on one hand, and experimentation, on the other? How hard is it to write a novel that is exciting and new and strange but also entertaining, as in “not obnoxious”? JOSHUA COHEN: I was about to answer this question, until that last phrase gave me paws. “Not obnoxious.” Maybe cats use the term differently. Maybe they use it to mean “not dog.” But here’s the thing, as a human: the word “obnoxious,” which is a recent lesser breed of the word “pretentious,” means nothing but “someone who thinks he’s better than I am,” or even just “someone who wants to be better than he is.” It’s a deflationary term, something to suck the air — hot or not — out of any enterprise. I write what I can, in an attempt to write what I can’t. That means it’s all a convention, and all an experiment — self-defined. The basic conceit of the novel is that Joshua Cohen (the writer) is hired to ghostwrite the autobiography of Joshua Cohen (the tech-hero behind a very Google-like mega-company). Are our destinies truly built into our names? How has your own Googlability been these days, as a Joshua Cohen? Nomen ain’t omen, no. But it ain’t not omen either. The point of Plautus’s pun is just that: all names are rhetoric too, of a strange and sacrosanct metonymy. I hold by the Jews: name for your dead, the metrics be damned. Speaking of the importance of names: We thought that your tech-monolith’s moniker, Tetration, was a bit of a mouthful, until we realized that “Google” is pretty awkward, too, it’s just that it’s an awkwardness we’re used to. But now Google has gone ahead and renamed their parent company Alphabet, which seems both facile and infantile. What’s your take? I just read about it when you did. I haven’t had time to think. Or care. I’m in a car in East Jerusalem and it’s a million degrees, in Celsius. I wish I owned more stock, or any stock. My favorite anagrams for “Alphabet” are “Bathe Pal” and “Able Phat.” The novel tackles a number of ripped-from-the-headline type issues, including NSA spying and Wikileaks. Were you nervous commenting or fictionalizing things that were so contemporary? I wasn’t. I knew from the first page that my setting was “the present, by which I mean the topical” (to quote the book). I should point out, though, that significant portions deal with the ’70s. And ’80s. And ’90s. And early 2000s.  Human-critics have been blabbing a lot about the resurgence of “autofiction,” which is basically made-up shit that incorporates actual people or happenings or whatnot. Is “Book of Numbers” autofiction? (What a dumb name, by the way. Almost as bad as when Douglas Coupland spawned “Translit.” Feel free to coin another term right now and we’ll start using it. A lot.) Is it easier to write about vulnerable or personal things in this kind of context, when it’s unclear what’s “true” and what is fictionalized? And is it really annoying when people try to parse which parts of the novel fall into which category? Impossible to answer this question when asked by a feline-proxy. I will say this: I didn’t use my own name, or the names of others, or of businesses, or, for that matter, of New York City streets, because I was “tired” of fiction, or “exhausted” by artifice. To the contrary... Anyway, this entire discussion is pointless. At the beginning of first-person narration in Western lit — and by the beginning I’m talking for centuries — readers always associated the narrators with the authors. Travelogues, the epistolary novel. Blah blah blah. A good chunk of the book is set in the United Arab Emirates. Our trusty friend Scott has described Dubai as “basically the worst place on earth,” an “endless air-conditioned nightmare of depersonalized, big-dick architecture,” etc. What’s your own, IRL Joshua Cohen experience with the region? Is it that bad? Were you at all nervous when you decided to — SPOILER ALERT — set some pretty salacious sexual material there, scenes which essentially involve a white American stalking a burka-wearing Yemeni++ and then engaging in fervent luxury-hotel-intercourse? I was there for all of 48 hours. On someone else’s dime. And it wasn’t a very large dime, in context. And yes, yes, it was a nightmare. An entire city, an entire series of cities, designed by Trump, who comes off as chivalrous compared to the sheikhs, incidentally. And I say all this as a proud son of Atlantic City... As for the sex scene you mention — sure, I was nervous. Not because of the politics, but because of the prose: have you ever tried to write an erection? What about that feeling of “brotherly pride in her shudder of orgasm” (John Updike)? Your previous novel “Witz” has always scared us a bit. Is that just typical kitten-ignorance, the fear of literature that’s basically half our body weight? It’s just a book. Nothing to fear unless it falls on you.  “Book of Numbers” is pretty zeitgeist-y in that fictional depictions of Google-style companies have been popular in contemporary fiction. We’re thinking of Dave Eggers’s “The Circle,” in which privacy issues surrounding the tech-company are also discussed (though more in the sense of social media and oversharing). One big difference between “Book of Numbers” and “The Circle,” though, is that the latter was really a piece of crap, totally boring and too long and heavy-handed. Have you read it? I have. Ah, we get it. Plead the fifth! Smart one, Mr. Cohen. Never good to make enemies in an industry that is already dying! Moving on: One of the things we loved about “Book of Numbers” is how it’s almost always apologizing for itself. In the segments that are composed of tech-CEO Joshua Cohen’s interviews, he keeps saying that he feels bad for ghostwriter-Josh, who has to transcribe all his ramblings. In some other segments, penned by the writer Joshua Cohen, it’s framed as a diary, the sort of loose, casual, unedited writing that’s not intended to have a real audience. But of course all of the prose is intended for an audience — us — and so I guess the question here is, how did you slip in and out of these modes, sort of pretending to be flippant or casual or tossed-off, while in reality the novel is a very tightly controlled and policed and manicured blast of language? It’s all an attempt to convince myself, before even convincing the reader. Meaning: I need to believe that what I’m doing I’m doing for myself, alone. That’s how I get my confidence. And hopefully that confidence will make some material, and hopefully that material will suggest some macro encompassing conceit that will let me encompass all of it, everything... This time around though, I tried to lay bare that process, as fitting with my theme. Loose, lefthanded, underedited, unedited: such is the art of surveillance. Published: August 26, 2015 Read full article here

Vintage Rolls-Royces Headline Bonhams' First Denmark Sale
26/08/2015
Vintage Rolls-Royces Headline Bonhams' First Denmark SaleBonhams’ inaugural Denmark auction, taking place September 26, will see more than a dozen classic Rolls-Royce motor cars go under the hammer. The single-owner sale of the Frederiksen Collection will comprise 13 very early vehicles from the British luxury marque, two of which are expected to achieve more than $1 million. The highlight of the group is a 1914 Rolls-Royce 40/50 Silver Ghost Skiff, a model that earned Rolls-Royce the sobriquet "the best car in the world,” that is estimated to go for between $1.1 million and $1.4 million. Also offered is a 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Open Tourer (est. $304,500 - $395,800) that was once owned by American biologist, suffragist and philanthropist Katharine McCormick, who is credited with single-handedly financing the research necessary to develop the first birth control pill. Post-war lots to watch include the 1933 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Continental Owen Sedanca Coupe, with coachwork by Gurney Nutting. One of just 12 of its kind made, this example was raced by society lady Peta Fisher against the Blue Train from Calais to Antibes in 1939 (the outcome of the race is uncertain) and is estimated to achieve between $860,000 and $1.1 million. The sale will take place at Lyngsbækgaard, a picturesque 16th-century manor house set in the Mols Bjerge national park near Aarhus, Denmark, that belongs to the owner of the collection, Danish millionaire Henrik Frederiksen. The collection of 48 vehicles, put together piece by piece by Frederiksen and his late wife, Vivi Frederiksen, over the years, is being dismantled after the death of the latter earlier this year. Other vehicles in the sale include three Mercedes-Benzes, three Cadillacs and two Bentleys, in addition to other marques such as Ahrens-Fox, Alvis, Auburn, Citroën, Chrysler, Duesenberg, Horch, Isotta Fraschini, Jaguar, Lagonda, Lincoln, Packard, Pierce Arrow, Renault, and Stutz — spanning the best of British, European and American classic cars. An extremely historic and luxurious 1933 Maybach DS-8 Zeppelin Cabriolet, with coachwork in the style of Spohn, is also crossing the block. Made especially for the German dictator Adolf Hitler to be presented to the Maharaja of Patiala in India in expectation of neutrality, or favor, for the German cause, the majestic blue car is expected to achieve between $3.1 million and $3.7 million. Meanwhile, Mrs Frederiksen’s favorite, a 1937 Maybach SW38 Zeppelin Special Roadster, may fetch up to $1.5 million. To view some auction highlights, click on the slideshow. Select Photo Gallery: The Frederiksen Collection at BonhamsPublished: August 26, 2015 Read full article here

Interview: Ralph Rugoff on His 2015 Biennale de Lyon “La Vie Modern”
26/08/2015
Interview: Ralph Rugoff on His 2015 Biennale de Lyon “La Vie Modern”The 13th Biennale de Lyon opens on September 10 with an exciting selection of works spanning two platforms, Veduta and Résonance, and three exhibitions: “La vie moderne,” “Ce fabuleux monde” moderne, and “Rendez-vous 15. ” The title exhibition, “La vie modern,” is guest curated by Ralph Rugoff, Director of the Hayward Gallery in London, who has brought together 60 artists from 28 countries who explore the contradictory character of contemporary culture in varied regions of the world. According to Rugoff, the works in “La vie modern” address the ways in which multifarious legacies of the “modern” era continue to colour and shape our perceptions as well as the salient scenarios and issues of everyday life. “The Biennale engages us in modes of seeing and thinking that help us to question the “new normalˮ and perhaps to rebuild concepts of La vie moderne that can truly address the paradoxical landscape of our present day,” Rugoff explains. “The 13th Biennale de Lyon aims to be a forum where visitors can engage in reflecting and questioning, re-imagining and renewing our concepts of la vie modern, inspired by works by artists with a capacity for juggling multiple viewpoints and producing perspectives that, in a time of global homogenisation, are defined by difference, rather than the predictable frameworks of the ‘necessary,’” says Rugoff. To find out more about the 13th Biennale de Lyon and the main exhibition, “La vie modern,” BLOUIN ARTINFO got in touch with Ralph Rugoff and asked him a few questions. The 13th Biennale de Lyon is titled “La vie modern.” What is the significance of the title and what does it title reveal about the artists and works that will showcased during the event? The word “modern” still means new, yet the phrase “la vie modern” now sounds like a relic from history. It evinces a decided ambiguity: to say something is “modern’ nowadays imbues it with an aura of uncertainty – it suggests something haunted by history as well as forward-looking. So I hope the title poses a question - what does “la vie moderne” mean today? I don't think there's a simple answer. Rather, I think this title points towards the notion that the modern era continues to haunt us, and that the “contemporary” is still deeply engaged in working through legacies of the modern project. As this is very much designed to be an exhibition featuring works of art that engage with and reflect on current social landscapes and cultural shifts in different parts of the world, the title is also a provocation calling into question superficial definitions of the “contemporary.” Against the notion that the contemporary is an endless horizon of the new, “la vie moderne” hopefully evokes a sense of how the present moment is layered and criss-crossed with different historical trajectories. What is often hailed as “new” or even “revolutionary” in popular media always emerges from ongoing developments with roots in the past. What was the basis for the curatorial selection and what do you want to reveal and explore with the artists and works you selected? Most of the artists in “la vie modern” share a keen sense that the world they live in and observe is shaped by myriad streams of history, so that even as they explore the present they are also excavating the past. This is not a situation they view with irony; irony implies a distance, but these artists are acutely aware that we are all too deeply implicated in these scenarios to maintain any pretense of detachment. And in terms of selection, I have looked for works that embody imaginative verve, adventurousness and which engage visitors in open-ended conversations by showing them different ways of looking at, and framing, salient concerns of our modern life today. The Biennale will include a “salle des amateursˮ, featuring works by amateur cultural producers. Could you explain the motivation behind this project and what it will include? At this point, it looks like the “salle des amateurs” will not be part of the Biennale, due to logistical issues (just not enough time to organise it!) but images of amateur cultural productions will be evident in major works by Mohamed Bourouissa, Cameron Jamie, and Yto Barrada, among others, as well as projects by Jeremy Deller and Marinella Senatore (who are working together) realised with people from across the city of Lyon, including some of its poorest and wealthiest neighborhoods. In general, most of the artists in “la vie modern” – from Ed Ruscha, the show’s senior figure to Arseny Zhilyaev, a Russian artist who is among the youngest – are deeply interested in this area of amateur cultural production.  The word “modernˮ is a loaded term, especially within the canon of art history. You talk of the need to reflect and question re-imagine and renew our concepts of la vie modern. Why is this important and why now? I hope that the phrase “la vie modern” doesn’t evoke modernism, so much as an idea of modern life, with a very diverse history that includes Baudelaire (his essay “The Painter of Modern Life”), Charlie Chaplin (‘Modern Times”), Walter Benjamin, Jacques Tati, etc. It is a broad umbrella that shelters many different definitions of what modern might be. What intrigues me about bringing back this concept today is that it can serve as a means of questioning our faith in the “contemporary” as a meaningful category.  Over 60% of the participating artists are creating new work for the Biennale. How do these new works engage with the idea of “La vie modern” and in what ways have the artists interpreted the phrase in the works? Throughout the Biennale, visitors will encounter artworks that address the mixed legacies of the modern era that we continue to grapple with today, from crises created by excess consumption to questions related to post-colonialism, immigration and national identity. At the same time, other artists in the Biennale are looking at the consequences of technological acceleration and its proliferation in our daily life, and how it is changing our sense of the relationship between images and objects, ideas of work and leisure, nature and culture, and our relations with one another and with ourselves.  What are some of the unmissable new works in the Biennale? I think there will be many “unmissable” new works, ranging from new paintings by artists like George Condo, Thomas Eggerer, Anna Ostoya, and Johannes Kahrs to mixed-media installations by “post-internet” artists like Guan Xiao and Katja Novitskova. Just to mention a few potential highlights, Camille Blatrix has designed a very special ATM machine that visitors will activate by using a bank card, but this particular machine features a charming animated host who will deliver some rather unsettling fiscal news. Kader Attia, meanwhile, is producing a major video installation exploring issues around ethno-psychology, a project which grew out of his thinking about the background to the Charlie Hebdo tragedy. A number of new works address histories tied up with Lyon's past. Ahmet Otgut has made a new version, shot in Turkey, of the first film ever made, the 1905 “Workers Leaving the Lumiere Factory” by the Lyon based Lumiere brothers; Jeremy Deller & Marinella Senator are working together with residents of some of Lyon's wealthiest and poorest suburbs on a series of performances; Fabien Giraud and Raphael Sibony, meanwhile, are creating a new film that links the city's 19th century textile industry and the server farms of today. Darren Bader is creating a new outdoor sculpture that resembles a very large eggplant with legs that seems to be drawing life by sucking water out of a pond in the park, while Hannah Hurtzig will present a new film in which Belgian philosopher c speaks about our ongoing relationships with the dead. 13th Biennale de Lyon Artists: Michael Armitage, Kader Attia, Darren Bader, Sammy Baloji, Yto Barrada, Nina Beier, Cecilia Bengolea & Jeremy Deller, Hicham Berrada, Camille Blatrix, Michel Blazy, Mohamed Bourouissa, Céleste Boursier-Mougenot, Nina Canell, George Condo, Alex Da Corte, Jeremy Deller, Simon Denny, Jessica Diamond, Thomas Eggerer, Cyprien Gaillard, Fabien Giraud & Raphaël Siboni, Guan Xiao, Anthea Hamilton, He Xiangyu, Camille Henrot, Hannah Hurtzig, Cameron Jamie, Johannes Kahrs, Lai Chih-Sheng, Emmanuelle Lainé, Laura Lamiel, Liu Wei, Andreas Lolis, Magdi Mostafa, Daniel Naudé, Mike Nelson, Nguyen Trinh Thi, Otobong Nkanga, Katja Novitskova, Ahmet Öğüt, George Osodi, Anna Ostoya, Tony Oursler, Marina Pinsky, Julien Prévieux, Jon Rafman, Miguel Angel Rios, Ed Ruscha, Massinissa Selmani, Marinella Senatore, David Shrigley, Avery K. Singer, Lucie Stahl, Tatiana Trouvé, Andra Ursuta, Klaus Weber, T. J. Wilcox, Haegue Yang, Yuan Goang-Ming, Arseny Zhilyaev. Select Photo Gallery: Sneak Peek: 13th Biennale de Lyon 2015Published: August 26, 2015 Read full article here

West 20th Street
26/08/2015
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.jackshainman.comFacebook Website: https://www.facebook.com/jackshainmangalleryTwitter Website: https://www.twitter.com/JackShainmanNY4SQR Website: https://foursquare.com/v/jack-shainman-gallery/457fe37ef964a520543f1fe3Location Email: info@jackshainman.comLast name: Jack Shainman GalleryEmail: info@jackshainman.comPhone: 212 645 1701Brief info:   Jack Shainman Gallery was incorporated in 1984. Its first location was in Washington DC. Soon after opening, the gallery relocated to New York City occupying a space in the East Village before moving to 560 Broadway in Soho and then to its current location at 513 West 20th Street in Chelsea in 1997.   The focus of the gallery, since its inception over 28 years ago, is to exhibit, represent, and champion artists from around the world, in particular artists from Africa, East Asia, and North America, by mounting major exhibitions of their work in the gallery, presenting artworks at important art fairs, securing museum exhibitions, and publishing major catalogues with full-color reproductions and scholarly essays on their artwork. Represented artists employ all mediums, with a tendency towards conceptual as well as politically and socially engaged artwork. The gallery presents approximately 15 exhibitions a year and participates in major art fairs including Art Basel, Art Basel Miami Beach, and The Armory Show. The gallery is a member of the Art Dealers Association of America.   Gallery artists have been included in many important exhibitions, such as Documenta (1992, 1997, 2002, 2007); The Venice Biennale (1990, 1995, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007); The Carnegie International (1989, 1999/2000); the Moscow Biennale (2005, 2009); The Gwangju Biennale (2000, 2004, 2008); The Havana Biennale (2009); The Johannesburg Biennale (2005); and the Whitney Biennale (1997, 2006). Gallery artists have been recognized with numerous awards including a Leonore Annenberg Fellowship, a Ford Foundation Grant, a Fulbright, a Guggenheim, a MacArthur, A Louis Comfort TIffany, a Joan Mitchell and the Golden Lion for lifetime achievement, and are represented in museum collections throughout the world and have been documented in countless publications, monographs, and films.Display: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: ChelseaMonday - Close: 12:00amTuesday - Open: 12:00amTuesday - Close: 12:00amWednesday - Open: 12:00amWednesday - Close: 12:00amThursday - Open: 12:00amThursday - Close: 12:00amFriday - Open: 12:00amFriday - Close: 12:00amLocation Phone: t +1 212 645 1701 Saturday - Open: 12:00amSaturday - Close: 12:00amSunday - Open: 12:00amSunday - Close: 12:00amMonday - Open: 12:00amHas Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: Tuesday - Saturday, 10am - 6pmlocation fax: f +1 212 645 8316 Location Region: US/CanadaGuide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: New York / Northeast Read full article here

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