television as art by Milan Atanaskovic / www.atanaskovic.com
Get the button embed code!
only ArtTV site

News

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 ... next »

American History Gets the Mike Kelley Treatment
17/09/2014
It begins with a somber-seeming wall text and ends with a countrified punk dissolving his grandmother in lye. If you’re looking for highbrow and refined, this is not it: Mike Kelley’s “Reconstructed History,” a 50-part series on view at Skarstedt in Chelsea through October 25, is as rude and ill-mannered as the explosive flatulence that is one of its many subjects. (Also popular: Bestiality; comically enormous penises; various configurations of oral sex involving comically enormous penises; Benjamin Franklin appearing to sign a treaty with his own comically enormous penis; etc.) The works are all small found images, most of them depicting key moments in American history, centered on sheets of graph paper, and defaced by Kelley with a pen. Those defacements tend toward the sort made by hormonal young men on bathroom walls or subway advertisements: Boobs, dicks, balls, all those basic anatomies sketched with puerile glee. Both the Statue of Liberty and the Empire State Building gain a pair of hairy testicles; a scene with Lewis and Clark degrades into the scatological. History’s players turn out to be little more than libidinal brutes, groping and poking and smoking weed. It is, of course, impossible to divorce this body of work from Kelley’s larger oeuvre, not to mention his untimely end. (What happened between these exuberant dick jokes and the artist’s suicide in 2012?) Kelley’s work was so often obsessed with the troubled terrain of childhood, and here he’s the bored high-school student mucking up his textbook in the back row. Somehow, it doesn’t come across as unpatriotic, even — just disdainful of the pomp and circumstance that attaches to the story we tell about ourselves and our investment in this granfalloon we call the United States. (Kudos to Skarstedt for having the guts to open the exhibition on September 11, even if it was an accident of scheduling. The gallery also has plans to republish the series in book form — the original artist’s book, published in 1990, can be purchased for $6,000 — which is good news. But maybe don’t buy it for your grandmother.)  Silly as “Reconstructed History” can seem, it’s strangely affecting, and not just because of the fate of its creator. Our forefathers barf on the Declaration of Independence, the American eagle barks “Bite It,” and the self-seriousness of both the nation and the art world is mercifully punctured, one cartoon phallus at a time.         American History Gets the Mike Kelley TreatmentSelect Photo Gallery: Slideshow: Mike Kelley's "Reconstructed History" at Skarstedt GalleryPublished: September 17, 2014 Read full article here

Slideshow: Highlights from Basilica Soundscape '14 - September 12-14, 2014
17/09/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Tags: PartiesAuthor(s): Benjamin ParkSub-Channels: MusicShort Title : Slideshow: Highlights from Basilica Soundscape '14 Read full article here

Ian Rosen at Kristina Kite
17/09/2014
Artist: Ian Rosen Venue: Kristina Kite, Los Angeles Date: 2014 Click here to view slideshow Full gallery of images available after the jump. Images: Image courtesy of the artist   Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in […]Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today. Read full article here

New York
17/09/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.allanstonegallery.comLocation Email: info@allanstonegallery.comGroups audience: Allan Stone ProjectsLast name: JosephEmail: bo@allanstonegallery.comPhone: 212.987.4997Display: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: Eighties & AboveMonday - Close: 12:00amTuesday - Open: 12:00amTuesday - Close: 12:00amWednesday - Open: 12:00amWednesday - Close: 12:00amThursday - Open: 12:00amThursday - Close: 12:00amFriday - Open: 12:00amFriday - Close: 12:00amLocation Phone: +1 212 987 4997Saturday - Open: 12:00amSaturday - Close: 12:00amSunday - Open: 12:00amSunday - Close: 12:00amMonday - Open: 12:00amHas Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: Fall/Winter/Spring Hours: Weds-Sat 12-5 pm Summer Hours:Tues-Thurs 12-5, Fri 12-4 Closed Augustlocation fax: +1 917 421 9895Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

Tampa
17/09/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.tampamuseum.orgDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: DUMBOLocation Phone: 813 274 8130Admissions: General admission prices are: adult $10; seniors, groups, military plus one guest $7.50; students $5; and children ages 6 and under free of charge. A pay what you will fee structure will be offered every second Saturday of the month from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., and every Thursday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.Collections: Paintings, works on paper, sculpture, Greek antiquitiesHas Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday: 11 to 7 Thursday: 11 to 9 Saturday and Sunday: 11 to 5location fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

Family Tree: The History of Georgian Cinema at MoMA
17/09/2014
Family Tree: The History of Georgian Cinema at MoMAA collaborative project spanning more than two decades, with many hiccups in between, is finally coming to fruition. “Discovering Georgian Cinema,” a series jointly produced by the Pacific Film Archive and the Museum of Modern Art, is the first comprehensive retrospective of the overlooked national cinema of Georgia. The series, which takes place at MoMA, will feature nearly 50 films and will be split into two sections: the first, titled “A Family Affair,” will be presented from September 23 through October 16 and will focus on the many bloodlines that run through Georgian Cinema history, from the earliest silent period through the present day. (The second, titled “Beyond Blue Mountain,” will begin on November 22 and will focus more closely on three distinctive periods in Georgian cinema.) In a recent phone conversation, ARTINFO spoke with Jytte Jensen, curator at MoMA’s department of film, about the origins of the series, the difficulties of putting together such an expansive program, and where Georgian cinema is today. This series has been in the works for a number of years. When did the process of putting it together begin and when did you become involved? I actually got involved very early on. I went with my then-boss Adrienne Mancia, who was the curator here at MoMA, to Tbilisi in 1991. That followed my first time at the Moscow Film Festival in 1988, where all the talk was about Tbilisi — that is where everything was happening. Adrienne and Edith Kramer at the Pacific Film Archive had been talking about Georgian films for a while, and whenever [Georgian] filmmakers would come they would often visit the PFA and MoMA. Often they would deposit their films at the PFA because they didn’t want to take them back home because they didn’t know what would happen to them. So the PFA has, over the years, assembled a really wonderful collection of Georgian films, starting all the way back with [former PFA curator] Tom Luddy, who’s now at the Telluride Film Festival, and Edith Kramer and now Susan Oxtoby. MoMA showed many films from the Russian Republics in the 1990s, with a special eye to one of the liveliest, which always was the Georgian cinema, and had filmmakers here and bought a few prints, which are in our archives. We always wanted to do a very large exhibition, and the two curators that came before Susan and I tried many times. But it never happened. Mostly because we dealt directly with the Georgians and they were very reluctant to give us prints from Gosfilmofond, the Russian film archive. That was where the major films were deposited during the Soviet period. There were no prints in the archives in Tiblisi. So Susan spent over a year and a half going to all the major European archives to find prints there we could use, which is what really made this series happen now. You mentioned the difficulties of working with archives. Were there other difficulties in putting together the series? The filmmakers have always been eager to participate. They want their films to be shown and they’re eager to show their films in the US. There were major exhibitions of Georgian cinema in Germany and France in the 1990s, but we could never get it together here simply because we could not get the right prints and we wanted to do it very comprehensively. We even planned larger exhibitions than this one, 60 to 70 films. This one is just below 50 at MoMA. What has been the biggest surprise during this long process? One of the surprises has been how well it holds up. I did see a lot of these films in the 1990s, and the historic films are pretty much what we selected then. But one of the great things about doing it now is that there’s an ongoing discovery about Georgian cinema because it has been so hidden and, in some cases, censored. Not everything that’s very, very good, and should be a major part of film history, has been discovered until recently. For that, the Pordenone Silent Film Festival has made some major discoveries by Russian and Georgian cinema experts. They found films in the archives that we didn’t know existed, including a very important film called “Buba,” from 1930, by an early female director, Noutsa Gogoberidze, who was the mother of the most famous Georgian feminist filmmaker of the 1960s and 1970s, Lana Gogoberidze. Noutsa was in a Stalinist camp and her films were always suppressed. Now Lana has found one of her mother’s films, which is amazingly beautiful and really a main discovery in terms of subjective documentary cinema. It’s been discovered in the last four years and we’re hoping to add it to our collection at MoMA. Was there work that you could not include in the series, due to lost or damaged prints? Yes, both of those reasons. There’s a lot of work to be done and they’re very aware of this in the various archives and film centers in Tbilisi. There’s s a lot of work to be done on prints, subtitling, and just really access to films so people can preview this treasure trove of films. So, yes: There’s films we heard about but couldn’t find; there’s films that we knew we wanted to include but were not able to find good prints. This is the minority, though. We did find a lot of stuff we wanted to include, and it’s been great to have this collaboration with so many archives. It also opened up to the Georgians that this is how they can collect their film history. Now they know where we got all these prints from and there are really not a lot of excuses other than money, and that is a very valid excuse of course. I wanted to ask about the structure of the series, which is broken up in two parts. I’ll tell you, really, I broke up the series for practical reasons. We start on September 23 and go to October 16. Right after that, we open our annual To Save and Project Festival. That goes for a month, and when that series ends we’re doing a joint event, which will open the second part of the Georgian retrospective with Kote Mikaberidze’s “My Grandmother,” from 1929. We wanted to make a break there because it’s very much the same audience the two programs are courting, people who are sensitive to film history and want to make discoveries and see films that don’t open in a movie house. We didn’t want to overlap, and we think both series are valuable. It also was natural because we wanted a populist first section, with this idea of the many family strains that go through Georgian cinema from the very beginning until now, where many of the new filmmakers are third generation filmmakers. We programmed also so we had a chance to show the three areas where Georgian filmmaking is brilliant: the silent period, the period of Soviet filmmaking in the ’60s and ’70s — where Georgian filmmaking was very strong — and the current generation with the New Georgian Cinema. Now, you can’t go to a festival where there’s not a Georgian filmmaker either participating or winning the prizes. Sarajevo just gave its Jury Prize to a Georgian film, “Brides,” by Tinatin Kajrishvili. Is there a particular film you’re most excited about showing people? No [laughs]. I’m excited about the films we’re showing with musical accompaniment. We open with Nikoloz Shengelaia’s “Elisso,” and this brilliant American composer, who is an expert on Georgian folk music, has made a beautiful composition. I’m excited about seeing this film come to life with ancient but still contemporary music. Published: September 17, 2014 Read full article here

St Petersburg
17/09/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.fine-arts.orgDisplay: Don't displayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Directions: Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: ChelseaLocation Phone: 727 896 2667Admissions: Collections: Has Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: Tuesday to Saturday 10AM to 5PM Sunday 11AM to 5PMlocation fax: Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: None Read full article here

Slideshow: Mike Kelley's "Reconstructed History" at Skarstedt Gallery
17/09/2014
Language English Featured: 0Order: 0Author(s): Regina MogilevskayaSub-Channels: GalleriesShort Title : Mike Kelley's "Reconstructed History" at Skarstedt Read full article here

New York
17/09/2014
Language Undefined Location Website: http://www.cavinmorris.comLocation Email: info@cavinmorris.comDisplay: DisplayUse alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): Address: Javascript is required to view this map.Neighborhood: ChelseaMonday - Close: 12:00amTuesday - Open: 10:00amTuesday - Close: 06:00pmWednesday - Open: 10:00amWednesday - Close: 06:00pmThursday - Open: 10:00amThursday - Close: 06:00pmFriday - Open: 10:00amFriday - Close: 06:00pmLocation Phone: t +1 212 226 3768Saturday - Open: 11:00amSaturday - Close: 06:00pmSunday - Open: 12:00amSunday - Close: 12:00amMonday - Open: 12:00amHas Cafe: Has Store: Has Film: Is Free Listing: Opening Hours Alternative Text: Location Logo: Artists: Martin ChambiMicha KleinPaul Wayland BartlettYuri KuperGraciela IturbideMariana YampolskyFritz HenleFelix CharpentierFlor Gardunolocation fax: f + 1 212 226 0155Guide Landing page: Region on the Guide Landing page: N Read full article here

Russia Pursues Arrest of Ukrainian Artist, Cutlog Cancelled, and More
17/09/2014
Russia Pursues Arrest of Ukrainian Artist, Cutlog Cancelled, and More— Russia Pursues Arrest of Ukrainian Artist: Russian authorities are seeking to arrest daredevil-turned-artist Mustang Wanted after he took credit for painting Ukrainian colors on a Moscow skyscraper last month in honor of Ukrainian Independence Day. Despite Russia’s international arrest warrant, Ukraine has said they will not give him up. The stunt performer, who described his feat as “an art performance,” has said that he is willing to turn himself over if Russia will release Ukrainian fighter pilot Nadezhda Savchenko. [TAN] — Cutlog Cancelled: As FIAC introduces its own satellite fair, (OFF)ICIELLE, its six-year standby Cutlog bows out, citing a lack of space. “All the venues potentially available are booked up by FIAC, which is supported by the town hall and the ministry,” said fair director Bruno Hadjadj. Cutlog New York, however, will go ahead as planned alongside Frieze New York next May. [Artnet] — New Associate Curator for Frick: Aimee Ng, who guest curated the museum’s Parmigianino show this past spring, has been named as the Frick Collection’s new associate curator. “We have tremendously enjoyed working with Aimee Ng over the past two years, and it is with great pleasure that we bring her onto our staff full-time,” said Frick director Ian Wardropper. “We anticipate benefiting greatly from her fresh perspective on our collection.” In other Frick news, pressure is mounting for the institution to drop its renovation plans. [ARTnews, Artnet] — Artists, Access, and the Internet: Stephen Tanenbaum argues that San Francisco artists upset over their displacement as a result of the tech boom should take comfort in the fact that technology offers them unprecedented global access. Of course, that may not be the case if net neutrality gives way to the “two-tier” Internet speed model — an issue on which art worlders are now officially speaking out. [HuffPo, TAN] — Tom Finklepearl’s Big Plans: The new commissioner of New York City’s Department of Cultural Affairs says his launch of CultureAID is just the beginning. [Artnet] — TripAdvisor has named the top 20 museums in the world based on user ratings. Let’s hope the reviews are more insightful than Yelp. [LAT] — The Seattle Art Museum’s Betty Bowen Award went to Ralph Pugay. [Artforum] — Elizabeth Egbert has been named the interim president at the Staten Island Museum. [DNAinfo] ALSO ON ARTINFO "What Nerve!": A Shadow History of American Art Garage Museum Teaches an Old Building New Tricks 21 Questions for Artist Nina Katchadourian Hermès Exhibits Sharon Harper's Ethereal Stills Check our blog IN THE AIR for breaking news throughout the day. Published: September 17, 2014 Read full article here

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 ... next »

Welcome to Art Television

New member
Sign up

Already a member
Log in



Museums / Institutions

Exhibitions / Events